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  1. Tahseen Béa (2008). Memory of Touch. International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series:5-82.
    Is the memory of touching always disguised by senses that forget where they come from? Creating distancethrough a mastery that constitutes the object as a monument built in place of the subject’s disappearance.The memory of touching? The most insistent and the most difficult to enter into memory. The one that entailsreturning to a commitment whose beginning and end cannot be recovered.Memory of the flesh, where that which has not yet been written is inscribed, laid down? That which has a place,has (...)
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  2. Christopher J. Berry, David R. Shanks & Richard N. A. Henson (2008). A Unitary Signal-Detection Model of Implicit and Explicit Memory. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (10):367-373.
    Do dissociations imply independent systems? In the memory field, the view that there are independent implicit and explicit memory systems has been predominantly supported by dissociation evidence. Here, we argue that many of these dissociations do not necessarily imply distinct memory systems. We review recent work with a single-system computational model that extends signal-detection theory (SDT) to implicit memory. SDT has had a major influence on research in a variety of domains. The current work shows that it can be broadened (...)
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  3. Susan J. Brison (1996). Outliving Oneself: Trauma, Memory and Personal Identity. In Diana T. Meyers (ed.), Feminists Rethink the Self (Feminist Theory and Politics Series). Westview Press.
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  4. Sue Campbell (2009). Inside the Frame of the Past : Memory, Diversity, and Solidarity. In Sue Campbell, Letitia Meynell & Susan Sherwin (eds.), Embodiment and Agency. Pennsylvania State University Press. 211--33.
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  5. Edward S. Casey (1987). Remembering: A Phenomenological Study. Indiana University Press.
    Edward S. Casey provides a thorough description of the varieties of human memory, including recognizing and reminding, reminiscing and commemorating, body memory and place memory. The preface to the new edition extends the scope of the original text to include issues of collective memory, forgetting, and traumatic memory, and aligns this book with Casey's newest work on place and space. This ambitious study demonstrates that nothing in our lives is unaffected by remembering.
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  6. Edward S. Casey (1984). Habitual Body and Memory in Merleau-Ponty. Man and World 17 (3-4):279-297.
  7. Robert G. Crowder & Heidi E. Wenk (1997). Glenberg's Embodied Memory: Less Than Meets the Eye. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (1):21-22.
    We are sympathetic to most of what Glenberg says in his target article, but we consider it common wisdom rather than something radically new. Others have argued persuasively against the idea of abstraction in cognition, for example. On the other hand, Hebbian connectionism cannot get along without the idea of association, at least at the neural level.
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  8. J. Timothy Davis (2001). Revising Psychoanalytic Interpretations of the Past. International Journal of Psychoanalysis 82:449-462.
    The author reviews a contemporary cognitive psychology perspective on memory that views memory as being composed of multiple separate systems. Most researchers draw a fundamental distinction between declarative/explicit and non-declarative/implicit forms of memory. Declarative memory is responsible for the conscious recollection of facts and events - what is typically meant by the everyday and the common psychoanalytic use of the word ‘memory’. Non-declarative forms of memory, in contrast, are specialised processes that influence experience and behaviour without representing the past in (...)
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  9. Manuel de Vega (1997). Embodiment in Language-Based Memory: Some Qualifications. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (1):22-23.
    (1) Non-projectable properties as opposed to the clamping of projectable properties play a primary role in triggering and guiding human action. (2) Embodiment in language-mediated memories should be qualified: (a) Language imposes a radical discretization on body constraints (second-order embodiment). (b) Metaphors rely on second-order embodiment. (c) Language users sometimes suspend embodiment.
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  10. Michael Devitt (2011). Methodology and the Nature of Knowing How. Journal of Philosophy 108 (4):205-218.
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  11. Elizabeth Ennen (2003). Phenomenological Coping Skills and the Striatal Memory System. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 2 (4):299-325.
    Most cognitive scientists are committed to some version of representationalism, the view that intelligent behavior is caused by internal processes that involve computations over representations. Phenomenologists, however, argue that certain types of intelligent behavior, engaged coping skills, are nonrepresentational. Recent neuroscientific work on multiple memory systems indicates that while many types of intelligent behavior are representational, the types of intelligent behavior cited by phenomenologists are indeed nonrepresentational. This neuroscientific research thus vindicates a key phenomenological claim about the nature of intelligent (...)
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  12. Linda Fisher (2011). Gendering Embodied Memory. In Christina Schües, Dorothea Olkowski & Helen Fielding (eds.), Time in Feminist Phenomenology. Indiana University Press. 14--91.
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  13. Arthur M. Glenberg (1997). What Memory is For. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (1):1-19.
    I address the commentators' calls for clarification of theoretical terms, discussion of similarities to other proposals, and extension of the ideas. In doing so, I keep the focus on the purpose of memory: enabling the organism to make sense of its environment so that it can take action appropriate to constraints resulting from the physical, personal, social, and cultural situations.
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  14. Arthur M. Glenberg, David A. Robertson, Michael P. Kaschak & Alan J. Malter (2003). Embodied Meaning and Negative Priming. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (5):644-647.
    Standard models of cognition are built from abstract, amodal, arbitrary symbols, and the meanings of those symbols are given solely by their interrelations. The target article (Glenberg 1997t) argues that these models must be inadequate because meaning cannot arise from relations among abstract symbols. For cognitive representations to be meaningful they must, at the least, be grounded; but abstract symbols are difficult, if not impossible, to ground. As an alternative, the target article developed a framework in which representations are grounded (...)
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  15. Stephan J. Holajter (1995). Ego Duplications, Body Doubles, and Dreams: A Contribution To a Phenomenology of Body Image and Memory. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 26 (2):71-102.
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  16. Rafaële J. C. Huntjens, Albert Postma, Liesbeth Woertman, Onno van Der Hart & Madelon L. Peters (2005). Procedural Memory in Dissociative Identity Disorder: When Can Inter-Identity Amnesia Be Truly Established?☆. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (2):377-389.
  17. Roger Chaffin Gabriela Imreh (1997). "Pulling Teeth and Torture" : Musical Memory and Problem Solving. Thinking and Reasoning 3 (4):315 – 336.
    A concert pianist the second author videotaped herself learning J.S. Bach's Italian Concerto Presto , and commented on the problems she encountered as she practised. Approximately two years later the pianist wrote out the first page of the score from memory. The pianist's verbal reports indicated that in the early sessions she identified and memorised the formal structure of the piece, and in the later sessions she practised using this organisation to retrieve the memory cues that controlled her playing. The (...)
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  18. John F. Kihlstrom, Jennifer Dorfman & Lillian Park (2007). Implicit and Explicit Memory and Learning. In Max Velmans & Susan Schneider (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Consciousness. Blackwell. 525--539.
    Learning and memory are inextricably intertwined. The capacity for learning presupposes an ability to retain the knowledge acquired through experience, while memory stores the background knowledge against which new learning takes place. During the dark years of radical behaviorism, when the concept of memory was deemed too mentalistic to be a proper subject of scientific study, research on human memory took the form of research on verbal learning (Anderson, 2000; Schwartz & Reisberg, 1991).
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  19. Stephen M. Kosslyn & Samuel T. Moulton (2012). Mental Imagery and Implicit Memory. In Keith D. Markman, William M. P. Klein & Julie A. Suhr (eds.), Handbook of Imagination and Mental Simulation. Psychology Press.
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  20. Martin Kurthen, Thomas Grunwald, Christoph Helmstaedter & Christian E. Elger (2003). The Problem of Content in Embodied Memory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (5):641-642.
    An action-oriented theory of embodied memory is favorable for many reasons, but it will not provide a quick yet clean solution to the grounding problem in the way Glenberg (1997t) envisages. Although structural mapping via analogical representations may be an adequate mechanism of cognitive representation, it will not suffice to explain representation as such.
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  21. Daniele Moyal-Sharrock (2009). Wittgenstein and the Memory Debate. New Ideas in Psychology Special Issue: Mind, Meaning and Language: Wittgenstein’s Relevance for Psychology 27:213-27.
    This paper surveys the impact on neuropsychology of Wittgenstein's elucidations of memory. Wittgenstein discredited the storage and imprint models of memory, dissolved the conceptual link between memory and mental images or representations and, upholding the context-sensitivity of memory, made room for a family resemblance concept of memory, where remembering can also amount to doing or saying something. While neuropsychology is still generally under the spell of archival and physiological notions of memory, Wittgenstein's reconceptions can be seen at work in its (...)
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  22. Babette Müller-Rockstroh (2004). In Memory. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 11 (1):55-65.
    Women’s embodied memories of “Dangerous Breasts”, generated as part of a wider collective memory project on women’s breasts, Iconstruct women as always at risk of our bodies turning against us. We trace through memory stories how we inscribe our bodies as “dangerous” through practices involving silence, fear, surveillance and diagnosis. We examine how regimes directed at the prevention and treatment of breast cancer serve, in our memories, to increase anxiety and distance us from our bodies and any sense of agency.
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  23. Rafael F. Narvaez (2006). Embodiment, Collective Memory and Time. Body and Society 12 (3):51-73.
    Although there are exceptions, most researchers on collective memory have neglected the idea that collective mnemonics involve embodied aspects and practices. And though the corpus of Collective Memory Studies (CMS) has helped us better understand how social groups relate to time, especially to the past, it has taken little notice of how embodied social actors collectively relate to time. In contrast, expanding upon the French School and the French sociological tradition, I argue for an approach that, on the one hand, (...)
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  24. María G. Navarro (2012). Review of 'Cuerpo vivido'. [REVIEW] Revista de Hispanismo Filosófico 17:283-286.
    Agustín Serrano de Haro edita y presenta en el volumen colectivo Cuerpo vivido una selección de textos memorables en torno a lo que en 1925 fue denominado programáticamente por Ortega y Gasset una “topografía de nuestra intimidad”. La reflexión fenomenológica acerca del intracuerpo fue un tema que ha preocupado y preocupa de manera notoria a los filósofos cuyos trabajos reúne este colectivo: Ortega y Gasset, José Gaos, Joaquín Xirau, Leopoldo-Eulogio Palacios y Agustín Serrano de Haro. Pese a ello, tal vez (...)
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  25. Ewald Neumann (2003). Meshing Glenberg's Embodied Memories with Negative Priming Research on Suppression. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (5):642-643.
    This commentary examines Glenberg's characterization of “suppression” in light of negative priming and related phenomena. After offering a radically different slant on suppression, an attempt is made to weave this alternative version into Glenberg's provocative discussion of embodied memories.
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  26. Israel Rosenfield (2000). Consciousness and Subjectivity: Memory, Language and the "Body Image". Intellectica 31:111-123.
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  27. Gilbert Ryle (1945). Knowing How and Knowing That: The Presidential Address. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 46:1 - 16.
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  28. Maxine Sheets-Johnstone (2003). Kinesthetic Memory. Theoria Et Historia Scientiarum 7 (1):69-92.
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  29. Barry Smith (2003). The Ecological Approach to Information Processing. In Kristóf Nyíri (ed.), Mobile Learning: Essays on Philosophy, Psychology and Education. Passagen Verlag.
    Imagine a 5-stone weakling whose brain has been loaded with all the knowledge of a champion tennis player. He goes to serve in his first match – Wham! – His arm falls off. The 5-stone weakling just doesn’t have the bone structure or muscular development to serve that hard. There are, clearly, different types of knowledge/ability/skill, only some of which are a matter of what can be transferred simply by passing signals down a wire from one brain (or computer) to (...)
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  30. Sidonie A. Smith (2003). Material Selves: Bodies, Memory, and Autobiographical Narrating. In Gary D. Fireman, Ted E. McVay Jr & Owen J. Flanagan (eds.), Narrative and Consciousness: Literature, Psychology, and the Brain. Oxford University Press. 86-111.
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  31. Jonathan S. Spackman & Stephen C. Yanchar (2014). Embodied Cognition, Representationalism, and Mechanism: A Review and Analysis. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 44 (1):46-79.
    Embodied cognition has attracted significant attention within cognitive science and related fields in recent years. It is most noteworthy for its emphasis on the inextricable connection between mental functioning and embodied activity and thus for its departure from standard cognitive science's implicit commitment to the unembodied mind. This article offers a review of embodied cognition's recent empirical and theoretical contributions and suggests how this movement has moved beyond standard cognitive science. The article then clarifies important respects in which embodied cognition (...)
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  32. Susan A. J. Stuart (2010). Conscious Machines: Memory, Melody and Muscular Imagination. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (1):37-51.
    A great deal of effort has been, and continues to be, devoted to developing consciousness artificially (A small selection of the many authors writing in this area includes: Cotterill (J Conscious Stud 2:290–311, 1995 , 1998 ), Haikonen ( 2003 ), Aleksander and Dunmall (J Conscious Stud 10:7–18, 2003 ), Sloman ( 2004 , 2005 ), Aleksander ( 2005 ), Holland and Knight ( 2006 ), and Chella and Manzotti ( 2007 )), and yet a similar amount of effort has (...)
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  33. Ron Sun (2005). The Interaction of the Explicit and the Implicit in Skill Learning: A Dual-Process Approach. Psychological Review 112:159-192.
    This article explicates the interaction between implicit and explicit processes in skill learning, in contrast to the tendency of researchers to study each type in isolation. It highlights various effects of the interaction on learning (including synergy effects). The authors argue for an integrated model of skill learning that takes into account both implicit and explicit processes. Moreover, they argue for a bottom-up approach (first learning implicit knowledge and then explicit knowledge) in the integrated model. A variety of qualitative data (...)
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  34. John Sutton (2009). Extended and Constructive Remembering: Two Notes on Martin and Deutscher. Crossroads: An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Study of History, Philosophy, Religion, and Classics 4 (1):79-91.
    Martin and Deutscher’s remarkable 1966 paper ‘Remembering’ still offers great riches to memory researchers across distinctive traditions, both in its methodological ambition (successfully marrying phenomenological and causal discourses) and in its content. In this short discussion, after briefly setting the paper in its context, we hone in on two live and under-explored issues which have gained attention recently under new labels – the extended mind hypothesis, and the constructive nature of memory. We suggest that Martin and Deutscher’s causal analysis of (...)
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  35. John Sutton (2009). The Feel of the World: Exograms, Habits, and the Confusion of Types of Memory. In Andrew Kania (ed.), Philosophers on *Memento*. Routledge. 65-86.
  36. John Sutton (2007). Material Agency, Skills, and History: Distributed Cognition and the Archaeology of Memory. In C. Knappett & L. Malafouris (eds.), Material Agency: Towards a Non-Anthropocentric Approach. Springer.
    for Lambros Malafouris and Carl Knappett (eds), Material Agency: towards a non-anthropocentric approach (Springer, late 2007).
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  37. John Sutton (2007). Batting, Habit, and Memory: The Embodied Mind and the Nature of Skill. Sport in Society 10 (5):763-786.
    in Jeremy McKenna (ed), At the Boundaries of Cricket, to be published in 2007 as a special issue of the journal Sport in Society and as a book in the series Sport in the Global Society (Taylor and Francis).
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  38. John Sutton (2006). Memory. In Donald Borchert (ed.), The Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Macmillan. 122-128.
    Remembering is one of the most characteristic and most puzzling of human activities. Personal memory, in particular – the ability mentally to travel back into the past, as leading psychologist Endel Tulving puts it – often has intense emotional or moral significance: it is perhaps the most striking manifestation of the peculiar way human beings are embedded in time, and of our limited but genuine freedom from our present environment and our immediate needs. Memory has been significant in the history (...)
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  39. John Sutton (2003). Constructive Memory and Distributed Cognition: Towards an Interdisciplinary Framework. In B. Kokinov & W. Hirst (eds.), Constructive Memory. New Bulgarian University. 290-303.
    Memory is studied at a bewildering number of levels, with a vast array of methods, and in a daunting range of disciplines and subdisciplines. Is there any sense in which these various memory theorists – from neurobiologists to narrative psychologists, from the computational to the cross-cultural – are studying the same phenomena? In this exploratory position paper, I sketch the bare outline of a positive framework for understanding current work on constructive remembering, both within the various cognitive sciences, and across (...)
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  40. John Sutton (2002). Memory: Philosophical Issues. In L. Nadel (ed.), Encyclopedia of cognitive science: Vol 2. Macmillan. 1109-1113.
    Memory is a set of cognitive capacities by which humans and other animals retain information and reconstruct past experiences, usually for present purposes. Philosophical investigation into memory is in part continuous with the development of cognitive scientific theories, but includes related inquiries into metaphysics and personal identity.
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  41. John Sutton, Celia B. Harris & Amanda Barnier (2010). Memory and Cognition. In Susannah Radstone & Barry Schwarz (eds.), Memory: theories, histories, debates. Fordham University Press. 209-226.
    In his contribution to the first issue of Memory Studies, Jeffrey Olick notes that despite “the mutual affirmations of psychologists who want more emphasis on the social and sociologists who want more emphasis on the cognitive”, in fact “actual crossdisciplinary research … has been much rarer than affirmations about its necessity and desirability” (2008: 27). The peculiar, contingent disciplinary divisions which structure our academic institutions create and enable many powerful intellectual cultures: but memory researchers are unusually aware that uneasy faultlines (...)
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  42. John Sutton & Kellie Williamson (forthcoming). Embodied Remembering. In L. Shapiro (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Embodied Cognition. Routledge.
    Experiences of embodied remembering are familiar and diverse. We settle bodily into familiar chairs or find our way easily round familiar rooms. We inhabit our own kitchens or cars or workspaces effectively and comfortably, and feel disrupted when our habitual and accustomed objects or technologies change or break or are not available. Hearing a particular song can viscerally bring back either one conversation long ago, or just the urge to dance. Some people explicitly use their bodies to record, store, or (...)
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  43. Evelyn Tribble & John Sutton (2012). Minds in and Out of Time: Memory, Embodied Skill, Anachronism, and Performance. Textual Practice 26 (4):587-607.
    Contemporary critical instincts, in early modern studies as elsewhere in literary theory, often dismiss invocations of mind and cognition as inevitably ahistorical, as performing a retrograde version of anachronism. Arguing that our experience of time is inherently anachronistic and polytemporal, we draw on the frameworks of distributed cognition and extended mind to theorize cognition as itself distributed, cultural, and temporal. Intelligent, embodied action is a hybrid process, involving the coordination of disparate neural, affective, cognitive, interpersonal, ecological, technological, and cultural resources. (...)
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  44. Endel Tulving (1987). Multiple Memory Systems and Consciousness. Human Neurobiology 6:67-80.
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  45. Wessel O. van Dam, Shirley-Ann Rueschemeyer, Harold Bekkering & Oliver Lindemann (forthcoming). Embodied Grounding of Memory: Toward the Effects of Motor Execution on Memory Consolidation. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology.
    Behavioural and neuroscientific research has provided evidence for a strong functional link between the neural motor system and lexical?semantic processing of action-related language. It remains unclear, however, whether the impact of motor actions is restricted to online language comprehension or whether sensorimotor codes are also important in the formation and consolidation of persisting memory representations of the word's referents. The current study now demonstrates that recognition performance for action words is modulated by motor actions performed during the retention interval. Specifically, (...)
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  46. Ullrich Wagner, Steffen Gais & Jan Born (2005). Refinements and Confinements in a Two-Stage Model of Memory Consolidation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (6):857-858.
    Matthew Walker's model overcomes the unrefined classical concept of consolidation as a unitary process. Presently still confined in its scope to selective data mainly referring to procedural motor learning, the model nonetheless provides a valuable starting point for further refinements, which would be required for a more comprehensive account of different types and aspects of human memory consolidation.
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  47. Daniel Willingham & Laura Preuss (1995). The Death of Implicit Memory. Psyche 2 (15).
    The thesis of this article is that implicit memory does not exist. Implicit memory.
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  48. Margaret Wilson (2002). Six Views of Embodied Cognition. Psychonomic Bulletin and Review 9 (4):625--636.
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  49. Belarie Zatzman (2005). Staging History: Aesthetics and the Performance of Memory. Journal of Aesthetic Education 39 (4):95-103.
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