Bookmark and Share

Emergence

Edited by Patrick McGivern (University of Wollongong)
Related categories
Subcategories:See also:
390 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 390
Material to categorize
  1. Mika Aaltonen, Harri Härmä, Timo Hyypiä & Matti Waris (2010). Emergence And Immergence Of Viruses. Emergence: Complexity and Organization 12 (4).
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Evandro Agazzi, Luisa Montecucco & M. Buzzoni (2005). Complexity and Emergence. Epistemologia 28 (2).
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Samuel Alexander (1920/1966). Space, Time, and Deity: The Gifford Lectures at Glasgow 1916-1918. Dover Publications.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Garland E. Allen (1966). A Model for the Emergence of Biochemical Novelties. BioScience 16 (5):325-331.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Peter M. Allen & Mark Strathern (2003). Evolution, Emergence, and Learning in Complex Systems. Emergence: Complexity and Organization 5 (4):8-33.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Frank Alvarez-Pereyre (2008). Catégories Et Catégorisation: Émergence Et Cristallisation de Quelques Problématiques. In Catégories Et Catégorisation: Une Perspective Interdisciplinaire. Peeters. 33--1.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Irene Appelbaum (2004). Two Conceptions of the Emergence of Phonemic Structure. Foundations of Science 9 (4):415-435.
    . Björn Lindbloms account of the emergence of phonemic structure is a central reference point in contemporary discussions of the emergence of language. I argue that there are two distinct, and largely orthogonal conceptions of emergence implicit in Lindbloms account. According to one conception (causal emergence), the process by which minimal pairs are generated is crucial to the claim that phonemic structure is emergent; according to the other conception (analytic emergence), the fact that segments are an abstraction from the physical (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Margaret S. Archer (2010). After Mandelbaum : From Societal Facts to Emergent Properties. In Ian Verstegen (ed.), Maurice Mandelbaum and American Critical Realism. Routledge.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Mariano Artigas (1991). Emergence and Reduction in Morphogenetic Theories. In Evandro Agazzi & Alberto Cordero (eds.), Philosophy and the Origin and Evolution of the Universe. Kluwer Academic Publishers. 253--262.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Harald Atmanspacher (2007). Contextual Emergence From Physics to Cognitive Neuroscience. Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (1-2):18-36.
    The concept of contextual emergence has been proposed as a non-reductive, yet well- defined relation between different levels of description of physical and other systems. It is illustrated for the transition from statistical mechanics to thermodynamical properties such as temperature. Stability conditions are shown to be crucial for a rigorous implementation of contingent contexts that are required to understand temperature as an emergent property. Are such stability conditions meaningful for contextual emergence beyond physics as well? An affirmative example from cognitive (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Harald Atmanspacher & Robert C. Bishop, Stability Conditions in Contextual Emergence.
    The concept of contextual emergence is proposed as a non-reductive, yet welldefined relation between different levels of description of physical and other systems. It is illustrated for the transition from statistical mechanics to thermodynamical properties such as temperature. Stability conditions are crucial for a rigorous implementation of contingent contexts that are required to understand temperature as an emergent property. It is proposed that such stability conditions are meaningful for contextual emergence beyond physics as well.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Archie J. Bahm (1948). Emergence of Values. Journal of Philosophy 45 (15):411-414.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Archie J. Bahm (1947). Emergence of Purpose. Journal of Philosophy 44 (23):633-636.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Alan Baker (2006). Complex Thinking: The Emergence of Everything? The Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication 2.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. LR Baker, The Emergent Self.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. N. A. Baldwin (1988). Increases in Post-Emergence Damping-Ofe of Agrostis Castellana and Po a Pratensis Following Treatment with Benomyl. Emergence: Complexity and Organization 1988 (1988).
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Yaneer Bar‐Yam (2004). A Mathematical Theory of Strong Emergence Using Multiscale Variety. Complexity 9 (6):15-24.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Ansgar Beckermann (1992). Supervenience, Emergence, and Reduction. In Ansgar Beckermann, Hans Flohr & Jaegwon Kim (eds.), Emergence or Reduction?: Prospects for Nonreductive Physicalism. De Gruyter. 94--118.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Ansgar Beckermann, Hans Flohr & Jaegwon Kim (1992). Emergence or Reduction?: Prospects for Nonreductive Physicalism. De Gruyter.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Ma Bedau (1996). Weak Emergence: Causation and Emergence. Philosophical Perspectives 11:375-399.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Mark A. Bedau (2010). 3 Weak Emergence and Context-Sensitive Reduction. In Antonella Corradini & Timothy O'Connor (eds.), Emergence in Science and Philosophy. Routledge. 6--46.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Mark A. Bedau (2008). Is Weak Emergence Just in the Mind? Minds and Machines 18 (4):443-459.
    Weak emergence is the view that a system’s macro properties can be explained by its micro properties but only in an especially complicated way. This paper explains a version of weak emergence based on the notion of explanatory incompressibility and “crawling the causal web.” Then it examines three reasons why weak emergence might be thought to be just in the mind. The first reason is based on contrasting mere epistemological emergence with a form of ontological emergence that involves irreducible downward (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Mark A. Bedau (2002). Downward Causation and the Autonomy of Weak Emergence. Principia 6 (1):5-50.
    Weak emergence has been offered as an explication of the ubiquitous notion of emergence used in complexity science (Bedau 1997). After outlining the problem of emergence and comparing weak emergence with the two other main objectivist approaches to emergence, this paper explains a version of weak emergence and illustrates it with cellular automata. Then it explains the sort of downward causation and explanatory autonomy involved in weak emergence.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Joseph Ben-David (1978). Emergence Of. In Jerry Gaston (ed.), Sociology of Science. Jossey-Bass Publishers. 197.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Gordon Bendersky (2000). Tlatilco Sculptures, Diprosopus, and the Emergence of Medical Illustrations. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 43 (4):477-501.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Franco Berardi (2005). Les radios libres et l'émergence d'une sensibilité post-médiatique. Multitudes 2 (2):15-22.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Carlton W. Berenda (1953). On Emergence and Prediction. Journal of Philosophy 50 (April):269-74.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Gustav Bergmann (1944). Holism, Historicism, and Emergence. Philosophy of Science 11 (March):209-21.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Reinaldo Bernal Velásquez (2012). E-Physicalism. A Physicalist Theory of Phenomenal Consciousness. Ontos Verlag.
    This work advances a theory in the metaphysics of phenomenal consciousness, which the author labels “e-physicalism”. Firstly, he endorses a realist stance towards consciousness and physicalist metaphysics. Secondly, he criticises Strong AI and functionalist views, and claims that consciousness has an internal character. Thirdly, he discusses HOT theories, the unity of consciousness, and holds that the “explanatory gap” is not ontological but epistemological. Fourthly, he argues that consciousness is not a supervenient but an emergent property, not reducible and endowed with (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Mark H. Bickhard (2004). Process and Emergence: Normative Function and Representation. Axiomathes - An International Journal in Ontology and Cognitive Systems 14:135-169.
    Emergence seems necessary for any naturalistic account of the world — none of our familiar world existed at the time of the Big Bang, and it does now — and normative emergence is necessary for any naturalistic account of biology and mind — mental phenomena, such as representation, learning, rationality, and so on, are normative. But Jaegwon Kim’s argument appears to render causally efficacious emergence impossible, and Hume’s argument appears to render normative emergence impossible, and, in its general form, it (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Mark H. Bickhard (2000). Emergence. In P.B. Andersen, Claus Emmeche, N.O. Finnemann & P.V. Christiansen (eds.), Downward Causation. University of Aarhus Press. 322-348.
    * This paper was to have been written jointly with Don Campbell. His tragic death on May 6, 1996, occurred before we had been able to do much planning for the paper. As a result, this is undoubtedly a very different paper than if Don and I had written it together, and, undoubtedly, not as good a paper. Nevertheless, I believe it maintains at least the spirit of what we had discussed. Clearly, all errors are mine alone.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Alexander Bird (2008). Causal Exclusion and Evolved Emergent Properties. In Ruth Groff (ed.), Revitalizing Causality: Realism About Causality in Philosophy and Social Science. Routledge. 163--78.
    Emergent properties are intended to be genuine, natural higher level causally efficacious properties irreducible to physical ones. At the same time they are somehow dependent on or 'emergent from' complexes of physical properties, so that the doctrine of emergent properties is not supposed to be returned to dualism. The doctrine faces two challenges: (i) to explain precisely how it is that such properties emerge - what is emergence; (ii) to explain how they sidestep the exclusion problem - how it is (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Michel Bitbol (2007). Ontology, Matter and Emergence. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 6 (3):293-307.
    “Ontological emergence” of inherent high-level properties with causal powers is witnessed nowhere. A non-substantialist conception of emergence works much better. It allows downward causation, provided our concept of causality is transformed accordingly.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. James Blachowicz (2013). The Constraint Interpretation of Physical Emergence. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 44 (1):21-40.
    I develop a variant of the constraint interpretation of the emergence of purely physical (non-biological) entities, focusing on the principle of the non-derivability of actual physical states from possible physical states (physical laws) alone. While this is a necessary condition for any account of emergence, it is not sufficient, for it becomes trivial if not extended to types of constraint that specifically constitute physical entities, namely, those that individuate and differentiate them. Because physical organizations with these features are in fact (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. James Blachowicz (2012). Essential Difference: Toward a Metaphysics of Emergence. State University of New York Press.
    Proposes a new way of understanding the nature of metaphysics, focusing on nonreductionist emergence theory, both in ancient and modern philosophy, as well as in contemporary philosophy of science.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Jim Blackmon (2012). Review of" Re-Emergence: Locating Conscious Properties in a Material World". [REVIEW] Essays in Philosophy 13 (2):12.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. D. Blitz & M. Richmond (1994). Emergent Evolution: Qualitative Novelty and the Levels of Reality. Annals of Science 51 (6):661-662.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Shaun Le Boutillier (forthcoming). Emergence and Reduction. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Maria Brincker (2015). Evolution Beyond Determinism - on Dennett's Compatibilism and the Too Timeless Free Will Debate. Journal of Cognition and Neuroethics 3 (1):39-74.
    Most of the free will debate operates under the assumption that classic determinism and indeterminism are the only metaphysical options available. Through an analysis of Dennett’s view of free will as gradually evolving this article attempts to point to emergentist, interactivist and temporal metaphysical options, which have been left largely unexplored by contemporary theorists. Whereas, Dennett himself holds that “the kind of free will worth wanting” is compatible with classic determinism, I propose that his models of determinism fit poorly with (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Dr Steven Ravett Brown (2009). Reentrant Emergence. Cogprints.
    Emergent properties (EPs) are not causally reducible to the properties of a complex system’s elements. If a system’s properties cannot be reduced to those of any of its components, then that system is effectively a singular entity (SE). EPs are thus not properties of known complexes, but of SEs. A precise description of the parameters necessary to observe a physical system as an SE is thus necessary to establish under what conditions properties are understood as emergent. That description is provided (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Steven Ravett Brown (2009). Reentrant emergence. American Philosophical Quarterly 46 (3):225 - 238.
    Despite its long history, there is no agreed-upon conception of emergence. One might claim that a common idea of emergence seems to be that something termed a "system" gives rise to, or possesses, characteristics termed "properties," which latter are absent or unmanifested in whatever individual components the system consists and are thus "emergent" from the system itself. However, types of systems discussed run a gamut from purely mental entities to simple tools . "Properties" is similarly unconstrained . The so-called special (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Mario Bunge (1977). Emergence and the Mind. Neuroscience 2:501-9.
  43. John Butler Burke (1933). The Emergence of Life. Philosophical Review 42:236.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. J. Butterfield (2011). Less is Different: Emergence and Reduction Reconciled. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 41 (6):1065-1135.
    This is a companion to another paper. Together they rebut two widespread philosophical doctrines about emergence. The first, and main, doctrine is that emergence is incompatible with reduction. The second is that emergence is supervenience; or more exactly, supervenience without reduction.In the other paper, I develop these rebuttals in general terms, emphasising the second rebuttal. Here I discuss the situation in physics, emphasising the first rebuttal. I focus on limiting relations between theories and illustrate my claims with four examples, each (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Jeremy Butterfield (2014). Reduction, Emergence, and Renormalization. Journal of Philosophy 111 (1):5-49.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Edward Callanan (1979). Emergence and Amelsis. Duquesne Studies in Phenomenological Psychology 3:15-31.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Chris B. Cameron (2006). The Emergence of Shape. BioScience 56 (10):851-852.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. David Chalmers (2008). Varieties of Emergence. In Philip Clayton & Paul Davies (eds.), The Re-Emergence of Emergence: The Emergentist Hypothesis From Science to Religion. Oup Oxford.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. K. Chenchulakshmi (2003). Emergent Evolution and Arambhavada-A Comparison. Indian Philosophical Quarterly 30 (3):371-378.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. John Ross Churchill (2010). Nonreductive Physicalism or Emergent Dualism : The Argument From Mental Causation. In Robert C. Koons & George Bealer (eds.), The Waning of Materialism. Oxford University Press.
    Throughout the 1990s, Jaegwon Kim developed a line of argument that what purport to be nonreductive forms of physicalism are ultimately untenable, since they cannot accommodate the causal efficacy of mental states. His argument has received a great deal of discussion, much of it critical. We believe that, while the argument needs some tweaking, its basic thrust is sound. In what follows, we will lay out our preferred version of the argument and highlight its essential dependence on a causal-powers metaphysic, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 390