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  1. Ismay Barwell (1986). How Does Art Express Emotion? Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 45 (2):175-181.
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  2. Monika Betzler (2007). Making Sense of Actions Expressing Emotions. Dialectica 61 (3):447–466.
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  3. Lisa Bortolotti (ed.) (2008). The Philosophy of Happiness. Palgrave.
    Philosophy and Happiness addresses the need to situate any meaningful discourse about happiness in a wider context of human interests, capacities and circumstances. How is happiness manifested and expressed? Can there be any happiness if no worthy life projects are pursued? How is happiness affected by relationships, illness, or cultural variants? Can it be reduced to preference satisfaction? Is it a temporary feeling or a persistent way of being? Is reflection conducive to happiness? Is mortality necessary for it? These are (...)
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  4. Bill Brewer (2002). Emotion and Other Minds. In Understanding Emotions: Mind and Morals. Brookfield: Ashgate.
    What is the relation between emotional experience and its behavioural expression? As very preliminary clarification, I mean by ‘emotional experience’ such things as the subjective feeling of being afraid of something, or of being angry at someone. On the side of behavioural expression, I focus on such things as cowering in fear, or shaking a fist or thumping the table in anger. Very crudely, this is behaviour intermediate between the bodily changes which just happen in emotional arousal, such as sweating (...)
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  5. Bill Brewer (2002). Understanding Emotions: Mind and Morals. Brookfield: Ashgate.
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  6. David Cockburn (2009). Emotion, Expression and Conversation. In Ylva Gustafsson, Camilla Kronqvist & Michael McEachrane (eds.), Emotions and Understanding: Wittgensteinian Perspectives. Palgrave Macmillan. 126.
  7. Wayne A. Davis (1988). Expression of Emotion. American Philosophical Quarterly 25 (October):279-291.
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  8. Sabine A. Döring (2003). Explaining Action by Emotion. Philosophical Quarterly 53 (211):214-230.
    I discuss two ways in which emotions explain actions: in the first, the explanation is expressive; in the second, the action is not only explained but also rationalized by the emotion's intentional content. The belief-desire model cannot satisfactorily account for either of these cases. My main purpose is to show that the emotions constitute an irreducible category in the explanation of action, to be understood by analogy with perception. Emotions are affective perceptions. Their affect gives them motivational force, and they (...)
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  9. Jamie Dow (2009). Philosophy (K.) Kristjánsson Aristotle, Emotions, and Education. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2007. Pp. X + 194. £55. 9780754660163. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 129:238-.
  10. Paul Dumouchel (2008). Biological Modules and Emotions. In Luc Faucher & Christine Tappolet (eds.), The Modularity of Emotions. University of Calgary Press. 115-134.
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  11. John D. Eastwood, From Unconscious to Conscious Perception: Emotionally Expressive Faces and Visual Awareness.
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  12. Beatrice Geldeder (2006). Toward a Biological Theory of Emotional Body Language. Biological Theory 1 (2):130-132.
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  13. Beatrice Geldeder (2006). Toward a Biological Theory of Emotional Body Language. Biological Theory 1 (2):130-132.
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  14. Peter Goldie (2000). Explaining Expressions of Emotion. Mind 109 (433):25-38.
    The question is how to explain expressions of emotion. It is argued that not all expressions of emotion are open to the same sort of explanation. Those expressions which are actions can be explained, like other sorts of action, by reference to a belief and a desire; however, no genuine expression of emotion is done as a means to some further end. Certain expressions of emotion which are actions can also be given a deeper explanation as being expressive of a (...)
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  15. Lorenne M. Gordon (1969). Conventional Expressions of Emotion. Mind 78 (January):35-44.
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  16. O. Harvey Green (1970). The Expression of Emotion. Mind 79 (October):551-568.
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  17. Forest Hansen (1972). The Adequacy of Verbal Articulation of Emotions. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 31 (2):249-253.
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  18. Ernest Hartmann (2000). The Waking-to-Dreaming Continuum and the Effects of Emotion. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):947-950.
    The three-dimensional “AIM model” proposed by Hobson et al. is imaginative. However, many kinds of data suggest that the “dimensions” are not orthogonal, but closely correlated. An alternative view is presented in which mental functioning is considered as a continuum, or a group of closely linked continua, running from focused waking activity at one end, to dreaming at the other. The effect of emotional state is increasingly evident towards the dreaming end of the continuum. [Hobson et al.; Nielsen; Solms].
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  19. Daniel D. Hutto (2006). Unprincipled Engagement: Emotional Experience, Expression and Response. In Richard Menary (ed.), Radical Enactivism: Intentionality, Phenomenology and Narrative: Focus on the Philosophy of Daniel D. Hutto.
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  20. P. Ivet (2002). Emotions, Revision, and the Explanation of Emotional Action. European Review of Philosophy 5.
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  21. Philip J. Koch (1983). Expressing Emotion. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 64 (April):176-189.
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  22. Adam Kovach & Craig De Lancey (2005). On Emotions and the Explanation of Behavior. Noûs 39 (1):106-22.
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  23. Joel Krueger & John Michael (2012). Gestural Coupling and Social Cognition: Möbius Syndrome as a Case Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6 (81):1-14.
    Social cognition researchers have become increasingly interested in the ways that behavioral, physiological, and neural coupling facilitate social interaction and interpersonal understanding. We distinguish two ways of conceptualizing the role of such coupling processes in social cognition: strong and moderate interactionism. According to strong interactionism (SI), low-level coupling processes are alternatives to higher-level individual cognitive processes; the former at least sometimes render the latter superfluous. Moderate interactionism(MI) on the other hand, is an integrative approach. Its guiding assumption is that higher-level (...)
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  24. Stéphane Lemaire (2002). From Emotions to Desires. European Review of Philosophy 5:109-136.
    In this paper, I defend the view that our knowledge of our desires is inferential and based on the consciousness we have of our emotions, and on our experiences of pain and pleasure.
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  25. Robert W. Levenson (2011). Basic Emotion Questions. Emotion Review 3 (4):379-386.
    Among discrete emotions, basic emotions are the most elemental; most distinct; most continuous across species, time, and place; and most intimately related to survival-critical functions. For an emotion to be afforded basic emotion status it must meet criteria of: (a) distinctness (primarily in behavioral and physiological characteristics), (b) hard-wiredness (circuitry built into the nervous system), and (c) functionality (provides a generalized solution to a particular survival-relevant challenge or opportunity). A set of six emotions that most clearly meet these criteria (enjoyment, (...)
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  26. Pierre Livet (2002). Emotions, Revision, and the Explanation of Actions. European Review of Philosophy 5:93-108.
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  27. Kym Maclaren (2005). Life is Inherently Expressive: A Merleau-Pontian Response to Darwin's the Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals. Chiasmi International 7:241-260.
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  28. Richard Menary (2006). Radical Enactivism: Intentionality, Phenomenology and Narrative: Focus on the Philosophy of Daniel D. Hutto. Amsterdam: J Benjamins.
    This collection is a much-needed remedy to the confusion about which varieties of enactivism are robust yet viable rejections of traditional representionalism...
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  29. John Michael (2011). Shared Emotions and Joint Action. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 2 (2):355-373.
    In recent years, several minimalist accounts of joint action have been offered (e.g. Tollefsen Philosophy of the Social Sciences 35:75–97, 2005; Sebanz et al. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 31(6): 234–1246, 2006; Vesper et al. Neural Networks 23 (8/9): 998–1003, 2010), which seek to address some of the shortcomings of classical accounts. Minimalist accounts seek to reduce the cognitive complexity demanded by classical accounts either by leaving out shared intentions or by characterizing them in a way that (...)
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  30. Graham Murdock (1971). Differential Reactions to the Regulation of Emotional and Physical Expression Among Third‐Year Pupils in Secondary Schools. Journal of Moral Education 1 (1):53-60.
    (1971). Differential reactions to the regulation of emotional and physical expression among third‐year pupils in secondary schools. Journal of Moral Education: Vol. 1, No. 1, pp. 53-60.
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  31. Elisabeth Pacherie (2002). The Role of Emotions in the Explanation of Action. European Review of Philosophy 5:53-92.
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  32. Hanna Pickard (2003). Emotions and the Problem of Other Minds. In A. Hatimoysis (ed.), Philosophy and the Emotions. 87-103.
    Can consideration of the emotions help to solve the problem of other minds? Intuitively, it should. We often think of emotions as public: as observable in the body, face, and voice of others. Perhaps you can simply see another's disgust or anger, say, in her demeanour and expression; or hear the sadness clearly in his voice. Publicity of..
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  33. A. H. Pierce (1906). Emotional Expression and the Doctrine of Mutations. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 3 (21):573-575.
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  34. Andrea Scarantino & Paul Grifftiths (2011). Don't Give Up on Basic Emotions. Emotion Review 3 (4):444-454.
    We argue that there are three coherent, nontrivial notions of basic-ness: conceptual basic-ness, biological basic-ness, and psychological basic-ness. There is considerable evidence for conceptually basic emotion categories (e.g., “anger,” “fear”). These categories do not designate biologically basic emotions, but some forms of anger, fear, and so on that are biologically basic in a sense we will specify. Finally, two notions of psychological basic-ness are distinguished, and the evidence for them is evaluated. The framework we offer acknowledges the force of some (...)
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  35. Debbie Shapiro (2006). Your Body Speaks Your Mind: Decoding the Emotional, Psychological, and Spiritual Messages That Underlie Illness. Sounds True.
    In Your Body Speaks Your Mind, renowned teacher and best-selling author Deb Shapiro shows you how mastering the language of your symptoms can actually increase ...
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  36. Joel Smith, Perceptual Recognition, Emotion, and Value.
    I outline an account of perceptual knowledge and assess the extent to which it can be employed in a defence of perceptual accounts of emotion and value recognition. I argue that considerations ruling out lucky knowledge give us some reason to doubt its prospects in the case of value recognition. I also discuss recent empirical work on cultural and contextual influences on emotional expression, arguing that a perceptual account value recognition is consistent with current evidence.
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  37. Joel Smith, Vision and the Ontology of Emotion and Expression.
    I offer an account of the ontology of emotions and their expressions, drawing some morals for the view that we can see others' emotions in virtue of seeing their expressions.
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  38. Marco Solinas (2012). Review of Elena Pulcini, Invidia. La passione triste. [REVIEW] Iride (65):200-201.
  39. Robert C. Solomon (ed.) (2004). Thinking About Feeling: Contemporary Philosophers on Emotions. Oxford University Press.
    Philosophers since Aristotle have explored emotion, and the study of emotion has always been essential to the love of wisdom. In recent years Anglo-American philosophers have rediscovered and placed new emphasis on this very old discipline. The view that emotions are ripe for philosophical analysis has been supported by a considerable number of excellent publications. In this volume, Robert Solomon brings together some of the best Anglo-American philosophers now writing on the philosophy of emotion, with chapters from philosophers who have (...)
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  40. Irving Thalberg (1962). Natural Expressions of Emotion. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 22 (March):387-392.
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  41. Edoardo Zamuner (2011). A Theory of Affect Perception. Mind and Language 26 (4):436-451.
    What do we see when we look at someone's expression of fear? I argue that one of the things that we see is fear itself. I support this view by developing a theory of affect perception. The theory involves two claims. One is that expressions are patterns of facial changes that carry information about affects. The other is that the visual system extracts and processes such information. In particular, I argue that the visual system functions to detect the affects of (...)
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  42. Edoardo Zamuner, “Perception of Other People’s Emotions”. ASCS09.
    In this paper I argue that one of the functions of the perceptual system is to detect other people’s emotions when they are expressed in the face. I support this view by developing two separate but interdependent accounts. The first says that facial expressions of emotions carry information about the emotions that produced them, and about some of their properties. The second says that the visual system functions to extract the information that expressions carry about emotions.
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  43. Edoardo Zamuner (2010). “Seeing Faces, Seeing Emotions”. In Armindo Freitas-Magalhães (ed.), Emotional Expression: The Brain and the Face. University Fernando Pessoa Press.
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  44. Edoardo Zamuner (2008). “Face Value. Perception and Knowledge Others’ Happiness”. In Lisa Bortolotti (ed.), The Philosophy of Happiness. Palgrave.
    Happiness, like other basic emotions, has visual properties that create the conditions for happiness to be perceived in others. This is to say that happiness is perceivable. Its visual properties are to be identified with those facial expressions that are characteristic of happiness. Yet saying that something is perceivable does not suffice for us to conclude that it is perceived. We therefore need to show that happiness is perceived. Empirical evidence suggests that the visual system functions to perceive happiness as (...)
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  45. Edoardo Zamuner (2008). Knowledge and Self-Knowledge of Emotions. Dissertation, University of Edinburgh
    This thesis addresses two questions. One concerns the metaphysics of emotions and asks what kinds of mental states emotions are. The other asks how the metaphysics of emotions bears on first and third-personal knowledge of emotions. There are two prevailing views on the nature of emotions. They are the perception and cognitive views. The perception view argues that emotions are bodily feelings. The cognitive view, by contrast, contends that emotions are some sorts of evaluative judgments. I show that both views (...)
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