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  1. Richard Allen (1973). Emotion, Religion and Education. Journal of Philosophy of Education 7 (2):181–194.
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  2. Helmut Altrichter (1986). Emotions and Material Interests. Philosophy and History 19 (1):68-69.
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  3. Roger Ames, Robert C. Solomon & Joel Marks (eds.) (1995). Emotions in Asian Thought: A Dialogue in Comparative Philosophy. SUNY Press.
    This book broadens the inquiry into emotion to comprehend a comparative cultural outlook. It begins with an overview of recent work in the West, and then proceeds to the main business of scrutinizing various relevant issues from both Asian and comparative perspectives. Original essays by experts in the field. Finally, Robert Solomon comments and summarizes.
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  4. Alexander Bain (1859). The Emotions and the Will. D. Appelton.
    ' But, although such a being (a purely intellectual being) might perhaps be conceived to exist, and although, in studying our internal frame, ...
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  5. J. M. Barbalet (1993). Confidence: Time and Emotion in the Sociology of Action. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 23 (3):229–247.
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  6. Frithjof Bergmann (1979). A Monologue on the Emotions. Bowling Green Studies in Applied Philosophy 1:1-17.
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  7. Fritz Breithaupt (2012). A Three-Person Model of Empathy. Emotion Review 4 (1):84-91.
    This article proposes a three-step model of empathy. It assumes that people have various empathy-related mechanisms available and thus can be described as hyper-empathic (Step 1). Under these conditions, the question of blocking and controlling empathy becomes a central issue to channel empathic attention and to avoid self-loss (Step 2). It is assumed that empathy can be sustained only when these mechanisms of controlling empathy are bypassed (Step 3). In particular, the article proposes a three-person scenario with one observing a (...)
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  8. Sylvia Burrow (2010). Review: The Self and Its Emotions, Kristján Kristjánsson. [REVIEW] Metapsychology Online Review 14 (20).
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  9. Sue Campbell (1994). Being Dismissed: The Politics of Emotional Expression. Hypatia 9 (3):46 - 65.
    My intent is to bring a key group of critical terms associated with the emotions-bitterness, sentimentality, and emotionality-to greater feminist attention. These terms are used to characterize emoters on the basis of how we express ourselves, and they characterize us in ways that we need no longer be taken seriously. I analyze the ways in which these terms of emotional dismissal can be put to powerful political use.
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  10. John V. Canfield (2009). The Self and the Emotions. In Ylva Gustafsson, Camilla Kronqvist & Michael McEachrane (eds.), Emotions and Understanding: Wittgensteinian Perspectives. Palgrave Macmillan. 102--13.
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  11. Noel Carroll & John Gibson (eds.) (2011). Narrative, Emotion, and Insight. Penn state university.
    While narrative has been one of the liveliest and most productive areas of research in literary theory, discussions of the nature of emotional responses to art and of the cognitive value of art tend to concentrate almost exclusively on the problem of fiction: How can we emote over or learn from fictions? Narrative, Emotion, and Insight explores what would happen if aestheticians framed the matter differently, having narratives—rather than fictional characters and events—as the object of emotional and cognitive attention. The (...)
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  12. Sue L. Cataldi (1996). Emotion and Embodiment Fragile Ontology. International Studies in Philosophy 28 (4):124-126.
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  13. John Cogan (1994). A Place for Emotion in Critical Study. [REVIEW] Human Studies 17 (2):277-284.
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  14. Christian Coseru (2004). A Review Essay of Destructive Emotions: How Can We Overcome Them? A Scientific Dialogue with the Dalai Lama. [REVIEW] Journal of Buddhist Ethics 11 (1):98-102.
    Destructive Emotions is part of a new wave of works seeking to enlarge the scope of cognitive science by joining together scientific and contemplative approaches to the study of consciousness and cognition. While some still regard this rapprochement with suspicion, a growing number of scholars and researchers in the sciences of the mind are persuaded that contemplative practices such as we find, for instance, in Buddhism resemble a vast and potentially useful introspective laboratory.
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  15. Luisa Damiano (2009). Creative Coordinations: Theory and Style of Knowledge in P. Dumouchel's Emotions. World Futures 65 (8):568-575.
    This article is a review of Paul Dumouchel's Emotions which focuses on the two levels of his emotion theory and heuristic. It interprets them both as the expression, in the domain of emotions, of a post-classical conception of nature and science that belongs to the tradition of scientific research on self-organization. Its main thesis, which is also shared by Emotions , is that creativity in nature and science corresponds to a process of coordination.
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  16. Marcel Danesi (1993). Concepts and Emotions. New Vico Studies 11:77-87.
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  17. Remy Debes (2011). Emotion, Value, and the Ambiguous Honor of a Handbook. Journal of Moral Philosophy 8 (2):273-285.
    Scholars take note: the philosophy of emotion is staking its claim. Peter Goldie's new Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Emotion (OHPE) is undoubtedly the most significant collection of original philosophical essays on emotion to date. It spans a broad range of topics from the nature of mind and reason to personal identity and beauty. It also boasts an incredible set of prestigious authors. But more than that - it bears testimony to its own legitimacy.
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  18. Craig DeLancey (2001). Passionate Engines: What Emotions Reveal About the Mind and Artificial Intelligence. Oxford University Press.
    The emotions have been one of the most fertile areas of study in psychology, neuroscience, and other cognitive disciplines. Yet as influential as the work in those fields is, it has not yet made its way to the desks of philosophers who study the nature of mind. Passionate Engines unites the two for the first time, providing both a survey of what emotions can tell us about the mind, and an argument for how work in the cognitive disciplines can help (...)
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  19. Jamie Dow (2007). A Supposed Contradiction About Emotion-Arousal in Aristotle's "Rhetoric". Phronesis 52 (4):382 - 402.
    Aristotle, in the Rhetoric, appears to claim both that emotion-arousal has no place in the essential core of rhetorical expertise and that it has an extremely important place as one of three technical kinds of proof. This paper offers an account of how this apparent contradiction can be resolved. The resolution stems from a new understanding of what Rhetoric I. I refers to - not emotions, but set-piece rhetorical devices aimed at manipulating emotions, which do not depend on the facts (...)
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  20. Frederick S. Ellett (1986). Research on Emotion: How Can It Be Done? Educational Theory 36 (2):115-124.
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  21. Andreas Elpidorou (forthcoming). The Significance of Boredom: A Sartrean Reading. In Daniel Dahlstrom, Andreas Elpidorou & Walter Hopp (eds.), Philosophy of Mind and Phenomenology: Conceptual and Empirical Approaches. Routledge.
    By examining boredom through the lens of Sartre’s account of the emotions, I argue for the significance of boredom. Boredom matters, I show, for it is both informative and regulatory of one’s behavior: it informs one of the presence of an unsatisfactory situation; and, at the same time, owing to its affective, cognitive, and volitional character, boredom motivates the pursuit of a new goal when the current goal ceases to be satisfactory, attractive, or meaningful. In the absent of boredom, one (...)
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  22. Andreas Elpidorou & Lauren Freeman (forthcoming). Affectivity in Heidegger I: Moods and Emotions in Being and Time. Philosophy Compass.
    This essay provides an analysis of the role of affectivity in Martin Heidegger’s writings from the mid- to late 1920s. We begin by situating his account of mood within the context of his project of fundamental ontology in Being and Time. We then discuss the role of Befindlichkeit (often translated as “attunement” or “disposition”) and Stimmung (“mood”) in his account of human existence; explicate the relationship between the former and the latter; and consider the ways in which the former discloses (...)
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  23. Eva-Maria Engelen (2009). Towards Conceptual Foundations for Bio-Cultural Research on Emotions. In Birgitt Röttger-Rössler & Hans Markowitsch (eds.), Emotions as Bio-cultural Processes. Springer.
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  24. Eva-Maria Engelen & Birgitt Röttger-Rössler (2012). Current Disciplinary and Interdisciplinary Debates on Empathy. Emotion Review 4 (1):3-8.
    Empathy as “Feelingly Grasping” Perhaps the central question concerning empathy is if and if so how it combines aspects of thinking and feeling. Indeed, the intellectual tradition of the past centuries has been marked by a dualism. Roughly speaking, there have been two pathways when it comes to understanding each other: 1) thinking or mind reading and 2) feeling or empathy. Nonetheless, one of the ongoing debates in psychology and philosophy concerns the question whether these two abilities, namely, understanding what (...)
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  25. Eva-Maria Engelen & Birgitt Röttger-Rössler (2012). Current Disciplinary and Interdisciplinary Debates on Empathy. Emotion Review 4 (1):3-8.
    Empathy as “Feelingly Grasping” Perhaps the central question concerning empathy is if and if so how it combines aspects of thinking and feeling. Indeed, the intellectual tradition of the past centuries has been marked by a dualism. Roughly speaking, there have been two pathways when it comes to understanding each other: 1) thinking or mind reading and 2) feeling or empathy. Nonetheless, one of the ongoing debates in psychology and philosophy concerns the question whether these two abilities, namely, understanding what (...)
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  26. Dylan Evans (2001/2003). Emotion: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press.
    Was love invented by European poets in the Middle Ages or is it part of human nature? Will winning the lottery really make you happy? Is it possible to build robots that have feelings? These are just some of the intriguing questions explored in this guide to the latest thinking about the emotions. Drawing on a wide range of scientific research, from anthropology and psychology to neuroscience and artificial intelligence, Emotion: The Science of Sentiment takes the reader on a fascinating (...)
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  27. Dylan Evans (2001). Emotion: The Science of Sentiment. Oxford University Press.
    Was love invented by European poets in the middle ages, as C. S. Lewis claimed, or is it part of human nature? Will winning the lottery really make you happy? Is it possible to build robots that have feelings? These are just some of the intriguing questions explored in this new guide to the latest thinking about the emotions. Drawing on a wide range of scientific research, from anthropology and psychology to neuroscience and artificial intelligence, Emotion: The Science of Sentiment (...)
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  28. R. G. Evans (2003). Patient Centred Medicine: Reason, Emotion, and Human Spirit? Some Philosophical Reflections on Being with Patients. Medical Humanities 29 (1):8-14.
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  29. Robert Feleppa (2009). Zen, Emotion, and Social Engagement. Philosophy East and West 59 (3):pp. 263-293.
    Some common conceptions of Buddhist meditative practice emphasize the elimination of emotion and desire in the interest of attaining tranquility and spiritual perfection. But to place too strong an emphasis on this is to miss an important social element emphasized by major figures in the Mahāyāna and Chan/Zen Buddhist traditions who are critical of these quietistic elements and who stress instead an understanding of an enlightenment that emphasizes enriched sociality and flexible readiness to engage, and not avoid, life's fluctuations in (...)
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  30. Agneta H. Fischer & Jeroen Jansz (1995). Reconciling Emotions with Western Personhood. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 25 (1):59–80.
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  31. Chris Fraser (2011). Emotion and Agency in Zhuāngz. Asian Philosophy 21 (1):97-121.
    Among the many striking features of the philosophy of the Zhu?ngz? is that it advocates a life unperturbed by emotions, including even pleasurable, positive emotions such as joy or delight. Many of us see emotions as an ineluctable part of life, and some would argue they are a crucial component of a well-developed moral sensitivity and a good life. The Zhuangist approach to emotion challenges such commonsense views so radically that it amounts to a test case for the fundamental plausibility (...)
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  32. Shaun Gallagher (2012). Three Questions to Stueber. Emotion Review 4 (1):64-65.
    In response to Stueber’s “Varieties of Empathy, Neuroscience, and the Narrativist Challenge to the Contemporary Theory of Mind Debate,” I identify three areas for further discussion: the frame problem, diversity, and an altogether different variety of empathy.
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  33. Joshua Gamson (1999). Taking the Talk Show Challenge: Television, Emotion, and Public Spheres. Constellations 6 (2):190-205.
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  34. Peter Goldie (2012). Comment on Breithaupt's "A Three-Person Model of Empathy&Quot;. Emotion Review 4 (1):92-93.
    Breithaupt’s central claim is that “empathy can be regarded as a mechanism for strengthening a decision” (2012, p. 87). My concern is that it is not clear what is meant by “strengthen.” Does empathy merely give more motivational “oomph” to a decision already made, or does it strengthen a decision in the normative sense—does it give more reason for the decision?
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  35. Peter Goldie (2002). Emotion, Personality and Simulation. In Understanding Emotions: Mind and Morals. Brookfield: Ashgate.
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  36. John D. Greenwood (1987). Emotion and Error. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 17 (4):487-499.
  37. Daniel M. Gross (2006). The Secret History of Emotion: From Aristotle's Rhetoric to Modern Brain Science. University of Chicago Press.
    Princess Diana’s death was a tragedy that provoked mourning across the globe; the death of a homeless person, more often than not, is met with apathy. How can we account for this uneven distribution of emotion? Can it simply be explained by the prevailing scientific understanding? Uncovering a rich tradition beginning with Aristotle, The Secret History of Emotion offers a counterpoint to the way we generally understand emotions today. Through a radical rereading of Aristotle, Seneca, Thomas Hobbes, Sarah Fielding, and (...)
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  38. Ylva Gustafsson, Camilla Kronqvist & Michael McEachrane (eds.) (2009). Emotions and Understanding: Wittgensteinian Perspectives. Palgrave Macmillan.
    This unique collection of articles on emotion by Wittgensteinian philosophers provides a fresh perspective on the questions framing the current philosophical and scientific debates about emotions and offers significant insights into the role of emotions for understanding interpersonal relations and the relation between emotion and ethics.
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  39. David W. Hamlyn (1989). False Emotions. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 275:275-286.
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  40. Michael Hammond (1983). The Sociology of Emotions and the History of Social Differentiation. Sociological Theory 1:90-119.
    In Primitive Classification, Durkheim suggests using the notion of affectivity to explain the emergence of various social structures. This bold attempt to extend the role of affectivity in sociological thinking has been rejected by most social scientists. By greatly elaborating Durkheim's outline for a sociology of emotions, however, this essay suggests that there is a fruitful way to use affectivity in macrosociological theory. This model allows us to develop in a new way Durkheim's description of structural differentiation and stratification in (...)
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  41. Valerie Gray Hardcastle (2003). Emotions and Narrative Selves. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 10 (4):353-356.
  42. Steven Heine (1998). Motion and Emotion in Medieval Japanese Buddhism. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 25 (2):191-208.
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  43. Göran Hermerén (1993). Emotive Properties: The Role of Abstraction, Introspection and Projection. Theoria 59 (1-3):80-112.
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  44. Douglas Hollan (2012). Emerging Issues in the Cross-Cultural Study of Empathy. Emotion Review 4 (1):70-78.
    Especially since the discovery of mirror neurons, scholars in a variety of disciplines have made empathy a central focus of research. Yet despite this recent flurry of interest and activity, the cross-cultural study of empathy in context, as part of ongoing, naturally occurring behavior, remains in its infancy. In the present article, I review some of this recent work on the ethnography of empathy. I focus especially on the new issues and questions about empathy that the ethnographic approach raises and (...)
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  45. A. Howard, Ritual, Memory, and Emotion: Comparing Two Cognitive Hypotheses.
    Without systems of public, external symbols for recording information, nonliterate communities have to rely on human memory for the retention and transmission of cultural knowledge. Religious expressions either evolved in directions that rendered them memorable or they were--quite literally--forgotten. Most religious systems, including all of the great world religions, emerged among populations that were mostly illiterate (even if there was a literate elite). Thus, it should come as no surprise that religious systems and ritual systems, in particular, have evolved so (...)
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  46. Phil Hutchinson (2009). Emotion-Philosophy-Science. In Ylva Gustafsson, Camilla Kronqvist & Michael McEachrane (eds.), Emotions and Understanding: Wittgensteinian Perspectives. Palgrave Macmillan.
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  47. Manyul Im (2002). Action, Emotion, and Inference in Mencius. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 29 (2):227–249.
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  48. K. S. Irani & Gerald E. Myers (1983). Emotion: Philosophical Studies. Haven.
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  49. Gad C. Isay (2009). A Humanist Synthesis of Memory, Language, and Emotions: Qian Mu's Interpretation of Confucian Philosophy. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (4):425-437.
    While Qian Mu intentionally avoided systematic philosophical arguments, his references to memory, language, and emotions, as expressed in a book he wrote in 1948, were suggestive of new interpretations of traditional Chinese, and especially Confucian, ideas such as human autonomy, mind, human nature, morality, immortality, and spirituality. The foremost contribution of Qian’s humanist synthesis rests in its articulation of the idea of the person. Across the context of memory, language, and emotions, the tiyong dynamics of mind and human nature recreate, (...)
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  50. John Kaag (2009). Getting Under My Skin: William James on the Emotions, Sociality, and Transcendence. Zygon 44 (2):433-450.
    "You are really getting under my skin!" This exclamation suggests a series of psychological, philosophical, and metaphysical questions: What is the nature and development of human emotion? How does emotion arise in social interaction? To what extent can interactive situations shape our embodied selves and intensify particular affective states? With these questions in mind, William James begins to investigate the character of emotions and to develop a model of what he terms the social self. James's studies of mimicry and his (...)
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