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  1. Rosangela Barcaro (1995). S. Bartolommei, Etica E Natura. Una “Rivoluzione Copernicana” in Etica?, Roma-Bari, Laterza,1995, Pp. XI-172, ISBN 8842045756. [REVIEW] Epistemologia 18:368-370.
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  2. J. Barkmann & R. Marggraf (2004). The Long-Term Protection of Biological Diversity—Lessons From Market Ethics. Poiesis and Praxis 3 (s 1-2):3-21.
    Economic markets are not morally free zones. Contrary to popular misconceptions, market functioning rests on the ethical principles of fairness and voluntariness. This ethical foundation can be traced back at least to moral philosopher Adam Smith, one of the founders of modern economics. In the inconspicuous form of microeconomic axioms, these moral foundations are preserved. Thus, virtually all “neo-classic” economic concepts presuppose a market ethics of fairness and voluntariness. In a world of pervasive uncertainty on the long-term development of the (...)
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  3. Saurabh Chandra (2013). Water Conservation & the National Water Policy (2012). SOCRATES 1 (1):58-79.
    Earth and every living organism on this planet require water for survival and without water there would be no life. Drinking water should be clean that means it should be free from micro-organisms, free from harmful chemical and other pollutants. Consuming unsafe drinking water may lead to several water borne diseases, and other long term and chronic health problems. Water conservation encompasses the policies, strategies and activities to manage fresh water as a sustainable resource to protect the water environment and (...)
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  4. Richard Christian (2016). Nature’s Legacy: On Rohwer and Marris and Genomic Conservation. Ethics, Policy and Environment 18 (3):265-267.
    Rohwer & Marris claim that “many conservation biologists” believe that there is a prima facie duty to preserve the genetic integrity of species. (A prima facie duty is a necessary pro tanto moral reason.) They describe three possible arguments for that belief and reject them all. They conclude that the biologists they cite are mistaken, and that there is no such duty: duties to preserve genetic integrity are merely instrumental: we ought act to preserve genetic integrity only because doing so (...)
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  5. Sanjay Kumar Dwivedi (2013). India's Efforts in Coping the Threats of Climate Change. SOCRATES 1 (1):43-57.
    The global Climate Change has unprecedented consequences in terms of scale and severity over human life. The accumulation of greenhouse gases and CFCs has increased environmental deterioration which is called global warming. Erratic changes in weather, brutal blizzards and floods, vicious heat wave etc. are only some of the effects of climate change. But the most dangerous effect of climate change is the melting of ice caps on the poles due to which sea levels are rising dangerously and life at (...)
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  6. Justin Garson, Anya Plutynski & Sahotra Sarkar (eds.) (2016). The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Biodiversity. Routledge.
    Biological diversity - or ‘biodiversity’ - is the degree of variation of life within an ecosystem. It is a relatively new topic of study but has grown enormously in recent years. Because of its interdisciplinary nature the very concept of biodiversity is the subject of debate amongst philosophers, biologists, geographers and environmentalists. The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Biodiversity is an outstanding reference source to the key topics and debates in this exciting subject. Comprising twenty-three chapters by a team of (...)
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  7. Erik Persson (2012). The Moral Status of Extraterrestrial Life. Astrobiology 12:976-984.
    If we eventually discover extraterrestrial life, do we have any moral obligations for how to treat the life-forms we find; does it matter whether they are intelligent, sentient, or just microbial—and does it matter that they are extraterrestrial? -/- In this paper, I examine these questions by looking at two of the basic questions in moral philosophy: What does it take to be a moral object? and What has value of what kind? I will start with the first of these (...)
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  8. Erik Persson (2008). What is Wrong with Extinction? Dissertation, Lund University
  9. Erik Persson (2006). What is Wrong with Extinction? - The Answer From Anthropocentric Instrumentalism. Dissertation, Lund University
    The book contains the first part of an investigation aimed at finding out why it is morally wrong to cause species to go extinct. That it is morally wrong seems to be a very basic and widely held intuition. It seems reasonable that a moral theory worth taking seriously ought to be able to account for that intuition. The most common attempt to answer our question is to refer to the instrumental value of the species for human beings – the (...)
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  10. Gesine Schepers (2014). Protection of Biodiversity for the Sake of Science? In Dirk Lanzerath & Minou Friele (eds.), Concepts and Values in Biodiversity. Routledge 329-348.
    Should biodiversity be protected also for the sake of science, as is sometimes suggested? I argue that it should not. First, I explain the “science argument”, as I call it, which says that biodiversity should be protected for scientific purposes, as an object of science. Second, I give reasons against this argument. I argue that the science argument contradicts our understanding of the natural sciences. In addition, I show that science does not depend on biodiversity. However, since biodiversity research depends (...)
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  11. Cristian Timmermann (2015). Addressing a Duty to Preserve Biodiversity, Not Genetic Integrity. Ethics, Policy and Environment 18 (3):262-264.
    Rohwer and Marris (2015) question the existence of a prima facie duty to preserve genetic integrity leaving open the question of what we should preserve. Many of the arguments used to justify their position could set the platform to defend a duty to preserve the diversity of both wild and domesticated species. In times where agricultural land covers a third of world’s land area and major efforts are undertaken to green urban areas a defense of biodiversity could benefit hugely by (...)
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  12. Cristian Timmermann (2015). Addressing a Duty to Preserve Biodiversity, Not Genetic Integrity. Ethics, Policy and Environment 18 (3):262-264.
    Rohwer and Marris (2015) question the existence of a prima facie duty to preserve genetic integrity leaving open the question of what we should preserve. Many of the arguments used to justify their position could set the platform to defend a duty to preserve the diversity of both wild and domesticated species. In times where agricultural land covers a third of world’s land area and major efforts are undertaken to green urban areas a defense of (...) could benefit hugely by intelligently incorporating human-induced diversification. It still remains critical to assess in how far new introductions compensate for losses and here the insights of those defending genetic integrity are an important tool. By acknowledging the added value of human-induced biodiversity we could slow down massive extinction of domesticated and semi-wild varieties by giving these a greater space in human-made environments. (shrink)
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  13. Cristian Timmermann (2015). Addressing a Duty to Preserve Biodiversity, Not Genetic Integrity. Ethics, Policy and Environment 18 (3):262-264.
    Rohwer and Marris (2015) question the existence of a prima facie duty to preserve genetic integrity leaving open the question of what we should preserve. Many of the arguments used to justify their position could set the platform to defend a duty to preserve the diversity of both wild and domesticated species. In times where agricultural land covers a third of world’s land area and major efforts are undertaken to green urban areas a defense of biodiversity could benefit (...)
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  14. Cristian Timmermann (2015). Addressing a Duty to Preserve Biodiversity, Not Genetic Integrity. Ethics, Policy and Environment 18 (3):262-264.
    Rohwer and Marris (2015) question the existence of a prima facie duty to preserve genetic integrity leaving open the question of what we should preserve. Many of the arguments used to justify their position could set the platform to defend a duty to preserve the diversity of both wild and domesticated species. In times where agricultural land covers a third of world’s land area and major efforts are undertaken to green urban areas a defense of biodiversity (...)
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  15. Cristian Timmermann & Zoë Robaey (forthcoming). Agrobiodiversität, das Gemeinschaftserbe-Prinzip und Marktanreize. In Stephan Schleissing & Barbara Brandl (eds.), Biopatente – Saatgut als Ware und als öffentliches Gut. Nomos