Related categories
Siblings:
9 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Order:
  1. Rosangela Barcaro (1995). S. Bartolommei, Etica E Natura. Una “Rivoluzione Copernicana” in Etica?, Roma-Bari, Laterza,1995, Pp. XI-172, ISBN 8842045756. [REVIEW] Epistemologia 18:368-370.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. J. Barkmann & R. Marggraf (2004). The Long-Term Protection of Biological Diversity—Lessons From Market Ethics. Poiesis and Praxis 3 (s 1-2):3-21.
    Economic markets are not morally free zones. Contrary to popular misconceptions, market functioning rests on the ethical principles of fairness and voluntariness. This ethical foundation can be traced back at least to moral philosopher Adam Smith, one of the founders of modern economics. In the inconspicuous form of microeconomic axioms, these moral foundations are preserved. Thus, virtually all “neo-classic” economic concepts presuppose a market ethics of fairness and voluntariness. In a world of pervasive uncertainty on the long-term development of the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Saurabh Chandra (2013). Water Conservation & the National Water Policy (2012). SOCRATES 1 (1):58-79.
    Earth and every living organism on this planet require water for survival and without water there would be no life. Drinking water should be clean that means it should be free from micro-organisms, free from harmful chemical and other pollutants. Consuming unsafe drinking water may lead to several water borne diseases, and other long term and chronic health problems. Water conservation encompasses the policies, strategies and activities to manage fresh water as a sustainable resource to protect the water environment and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Sanjay Kumar Dwivedi (2013). India's Efforts in Coping the Threats of Climate Change. SOCRATES 1 (1):43-57.
    The global Climate Change has unprecedented consequences in terms of scale and severity over human life. The accumulation of greenhouse gases and CFCs has increased environmental deterioration which is called global warming. Erratic changes in weather, brutal blizzards and floods, vicious heat wave etc. are only some of the effects of climate change. But the most dangerous effect of climate change is the melting of ice caps on the poles due to which sea levels are rising dangerously and life at (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Erik Persson (2012). The Moral Status of Extraterrestrial Life. Astrobiology 12:976-984.
    If we eventually discover extraterrestrial life, do we have any moral obligations for how to treat the life-forms we find; does it matter whether they are intelligent, sentient, or just microbial—and does it matter that they are extraterrestrial? -/- In this paper, I examine these questions by looking at two of the basic questions in moral philosophy: What does it take to be a moral object? and What has value of what kind? I will start with the first of these (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Erik Persson (2008). What is Wrong with Extinction? Dissertation, Lund University
  7. Erik Persson (2006). What is Wrong with Extinction? - The Answer From Anthropocentric Instrumentalism. Dissertation, Lund University
    The book contains the first part of an investigation aimed at finding out why it is morally wrong to cause species to go extinct. That it is morally wrong seems to be a very basic and widely held intuition. It seems reasonable that a moral theory worth taking seriously ought to be able to account for that intuition. The most common attempt to answer our question is to refer to the instrumental value of the species for human beings – the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Gesine Schepers (2014). Protection of Biodiversity for the Sake of Science? In Dirk Lanzerath & Minou Friele (eds.), Concepts and Values in Biodiversity. Routledge 329-348.
    Should biodiversity be protected also for the sake of science, as is sometimes suggested? I argue that it should not. First, I explain the “science argument”, as I call it, which says that biodiversity should be protected for scientific purposes, as an object of science. Second, I give reasons against this argument. I argue that the science argument contradicts our understanding of the natural sciences. In addition, I show that science does not depend on biodiversity. However, since biodiversity research depends (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Cristian Timmermann & Zoë Robaey (forthcoming). Agrobiodiversität, das Gemeinschaftserbe-Prinzip und Marktanreize. In Stephan Schleissing & Barbara Brandl (eds.), Biopatente – Saatgut als Ware und als öffentliches Gut. Nomos