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  1. Mark A. Michael (2003). What's In a Name? Pragmatism, Essentialism, and Environmental Ethics. Environmental Values 12 (3):361-379.
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  2. Elisa Aaltola (2010). Animal Ethics and the Argument From Absurdity. Environmental Values 19 (1):79-98.
    Arguments for the inherent value, equality of interests,or rights of non-human animals have presented a strong challenge for the anthropocentric worldview. However, they have been met with criticism.One form of criticism maintains that,regardless of their theoretical consistency,these 'pro-animal arguments' cannot be accepted due to their absurdity. Often, particularly inter-species interest conflicts are brought to the fore: if pro-animal arguments were followed,we could not solve interest conflicts between species,which is absurd. Because of this absurdity, the arguments need to be abandoned. The (...)
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  3. Elisa Aaltola (2010). The Anthropocentric Paradigm and the Posibility of Animal Ethics. Ethics and the Environment 15 (1):pp. 27-50.
    Animal ethics has presented various 'pro-animal arguments' according to which non-human animals have a more significant moral status than traditionally assumed. Although these arguments (brought forward, for instance, by Peter Singer, Tom Regan, Mary Midgley, Stephen Clark, and Mark Rowlands) have been met with various forms of criticism, a quick overview of animal ethics literature suggests that they are difficult to overcome. Pro-animal arguments seem to have consistency and argumentative support on their side. However, recently a new type of criticism (...)
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  4. Marianne Aasen & Arild Vatn (2013). Deliberation on GMOs: A Study of How a Citizens' Jury Affects the Citizens' Attitudes. Environmental Values 22 (4):461-481.
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  5. Edward Abbey (1983). Earth First! And the Monkey Wrench Gang. Environmental Ethics 5 (1):94-95.
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  6. Ruth Abbey (2007). Rawlsian Resources for Animal Ethics. Ethics and the Environment 12 (1):1-22.
    : This article considers what contribution the work of John Rawls can make to questions about animal ethics. It argues that there are more normative resources in A Theory of Justice for a concern with animal welfare than some of Rawls's critics acknowledge. However, the move from A Theory of Justice to Political Liberalism sees a depletion of normative resources in Rawlsian thought for addressing animal ethics. The article concludes by endorsing the implication of A Theory of Justice that we (...)
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  7. Norman Abeles (1996). Book Review. [REVIEW] Ethics and Behavior 6 (1):71 – 74.
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  8. Virginia Deane Abernethy (2001). Carrying Capacity: The Tradition and Policy Implications of Limits. Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics 2001:9-18.
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  9. David Abram (2008). Between the Body and the Breathing Earth. Environmental Ethics 27 (2):171-190.
    I take issue with several themes in Ted Toadvine’s lively paper, “Limits of the Flesh,” suggesting that he has significantly misread many of the arguments in The Spell of the Sensuous. I first engage his contention that I disparage reflection and denigrate the written word. Then I take up the assertion that I exclude the symbolic dimension of experience from my account, and indeed that I seek to eliminate the symbolic from our interactions with others. Finally, I refute his claim (...)
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  10. David Abram (2005). Between the Body and the Breathing Earth: A Reply to Ted Toadvine. Environmental Ethics 27 (2):171-190.
    I take issue with several themes in Ted Toadvine’s lively paper, “Limits of the Flesh,” suggesting that he has significantly misread many of the arguments in The Spell of the Sensuous. I first engage his contention that I disparage reflection and denigrate the written word. Then I take up the assertion that I exclude the symbolic dimension of experience from my account, and indeed that I seek to eliminate the symbolic from our interactions with others. Finally, I refute his claim (...)
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  11. David Abram (1988). Merleau-Ponty and the Voice of the Earth. Environmental Ethics 10 (2):101-120.
    Ecologists and environmental theorists have paid little attention to our direct, sensory experience of the enveloping world. In this paper I discuss the importance of such experience for ecological philosophy. Merleau-Ponty’s careful phenomenology of perceptual experience shows perception to be an inherently creative, participatory activity-a sort of conversation, carried on underneath our spoken discourse, between the living body and its world. His later work discloses the character of language itself as a medium born of the body’s participation with a world (...)
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  12. David Abrams (2001). A Reply to “Phenomenology Versus Pragmatism”. Environmental Ethics 23 (3):335-336.
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  13. David Abrams (2001). A Reply to “Phenomenology Versus Pragmatism”. Environmental Ethics 23 (3):335-336.
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  14. Sumaia Ma Abukashawa (forthcoming). The Eco-Sustainability Monthly Forum (15) UNESCO/Cousteau Ecotechnie Chair in Computer Man College for Computer Studies. Environmental Ethics.
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  15. Jane Adams (2005). Class: An Essential Aspect of Watershed Planning. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 18 (6):533-556.
    A study of a watershed planning process in the Cache River Watershed in southern Illinois revealed that class divisions, based on property ownership, underlay key conflicts over land use and decision-making relevant to resource use. A class analysis of the region indicates that the planning process served to endorse and solidify the locally-dominant theory that landownership confers the right to govern. This obscured the class differences between large full-time farmers and small-holders whose livelihood depends on non-farm labor. These two groups (...)
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  16. John Adams (1993). The Emperor's Old Clothes: The Curious Comeback of Cost-Benefit Analysis. Environmental Values 2 (3):247 - 260.
    Cost-benefit analysis is enjoying a resurgence. Despite its well documented failures in the past to cope with the environmental damage caused by major transport projects, and despite lack of progress in resolving the causes of these failures, Britain's Department of the Environment now proposes to apply it not just to projects, but to the formulation of policy. Curious.
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  17. Paul C. Adams (2007). Introduction to 'Technological Change': A Special Issue of Ethics, Place & Environment. Ethics, Place and Environment 10 (1):1 – 6.
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  18. Tim Adamson (2005). Measure for Measure: The Reliance of Human Knowledge on the Things of the World. Ethics and the Environment 10 (2):175-194.
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  19. Adesoji O. Adelaja & Robin G. Brumfield (1991). Research Note on Equity and Ethics in State-Promotion of Agricultural Products. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 4 (1):82-88.
    Many state governments in the United States promote locally-produced farm products. This paper discusses issues related to the ethics and equity of such promotional programs. The paper argues that generic promotion is generally easier to justify in terms of ethics and equity than brand promotion. It also argues that informative and factual brand promotions are easier to justify than deceptive and persuasive brand promotions. Additional equity issues arising when taxpayers finance state-promotional programs are also discussed.
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  20. Adesoji Adelaja, Donn Derr & Karen Rose-Tank (1989). Economic and Equity Implications of Land-Use Zoning in Suburban Agriculture. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 2 (2):97-112.
    A cash-flow viability model is used to evaluate the impacts of land-use zoning on farm households in New Jersey. Findings suggest that zoning results in increased production expenses, lower efficiency and profitability, and the devaluation of land assets. Cash flow and economic viability are, thus, reduced. Impacts of zoning on farm incomes, off-farm incomes, revenues from land sales, indebtedness, and farm sizes were not statistically significant. The results suggest that the use of land-use zoning statutes to guarantee the existence of (...)
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  21. Ademola A. Adenle (2014). Stakeholders' Perceptions of GM Technology in West Africa: Assessing the Responses of Policymakers and Scientists in Ghana and Nigeria. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (2):241-263.
    The perception of two key stakeholders such as policymakers and scientists on genetic modification (GM) technology was examined in Ghana and Nigeria using semi-structured interviews. A total sample of 20 policymakers (16 at ministries and 4 at parliament/cabinet) and 58 scientists (43 at research institutes and 15 at universities) participated at the interviews. This study revealed respondents perspectives on potential benefits and risks of GM technology, status and development of biosafety regulatory frameworks, role of science and technology innovation in agricultural (...)
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  22. Maniklal Adhikary & Samrat Chowdhury (2010). The Aim of This Paper is to Bring Out the Effect of Economic Reforms Introduced in India on the Direction of Virtual Water Trade (Through Trade of Agricultural Products). The Study Also Identifies the Dual Role That Virtual Water has in an Economy. It is a Source of Export Earnings (Benefit Side), but at the Same Time There is a Loss of Virtual Water (Cost Side) Through Agricultural Trade. The Study is Novel in the Sense That It Not Only Identifies the Trade-Off Between Benefits and Costs of Virtual ... [REVIEW] Environmental Values 19 (1):33-56.
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  23. Jonathan H. Adler (2012). Is the Common Law a Free-Market Solution to Pollution? Critical Review 24 (1):61-85.
    Whereas conventional analyses characterize environmental problems as examples of market failure, proponents of free-market environmentalism (FME) consider the problem to be a lack of markets and, in particular, a lack of enforceable and exchangeable property rights. Enforcing property rights alleviates disputes about, as well as the overuse of, most natural resources. FME diagnoses of pollution are much weaker, however. Most FME proponents suggest that common-law tort suits can adequately protect private property and ecological resources from pollution. Yet such claims have (...)
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  24. Stefan Aerts, Dirk Lips, Stuart Spencer, Eddy Decuypere & Johan De Tavernier (2006). A New Framework for the Assessment of Animal Welfare: Integrating Existing Knowledge From a Practical Ethics Perspective. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 19 (1):67-76.
    When making an assessment of animal welfare, it is important to take environmental (housing) or animal-based parameters into account. An alternative approach is to focus on the behavior and appearance of the animal, without making actual measurements or quantifying this. None of these tell the whole story. In this paper, we suggest that it is possible to find common ground between these (seemingly) diametrically opposed positions and argue that this may be the way to deal with the complexity of animal (...)
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  25. John Agnew, Ash Amin, Jacqui Burgess, Robert Chambers, Graham Chapman, Denis Cosgrove, Gouranga Dasvarma, Klaus Dodds, Sally Eden & Nick Entrikin (1998). Referees for Ethics, Place and Environment, Volume 1, 1998. Ethics, Place and Environment 1 (2):269.
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  26. Marko Ahteensuu (2012). Assumptions of the Deficit Model Type of Thinking: Ignorance, Attitudes, and Science Communication in the Debate on Genetic Engineering in Agriculture. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (3):295-313.
    This paper spells out and discusses four assumptions of the deficit model type of thinking. The assumptions are: First, the public is ignorant of science. Second, the public has negative attitudes towards (specific instances of) science and technology. Third, ignorance is at the root of these negative attitudes. Fourth, the public’s knowledge deficit can be remedied by one-way science communication from scientists to citizens. It is argued that there is nothing wrong with ignorance-based explanations per se. Ignorance accounts at least (...)
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  27. Marko Ahteensuu & Susanna Lehvävirta (2014). Assisted Migration, Risks and Scientific Uncertainty, and Ethics: A Comment on Albrecht Et Al.'S Review Paper. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (3):471-477.
    In response to Albrecht et al.’s (J Agric Environ Ethics 26(4):827–845, 2013) discussion on the ethics of assisted migration, we emphasize the issues of risk and scientific uncertainty as an inextricable part of a comprehensive ethical evaluation. Insisting on a separation of risk and ethical considerations, although arguably common in many policy contexts, is at best misguided and at worst damaging.
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  28. Scott F. Aiken (2009). The Significance of Al Gore's Purported Hypocrisy. Environmental Ethics 31 (1):111-112.
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  29. William Aiken (1992). Human Rights in an Ecological Era. Environmental Values 1 (3):191 - 203.
    After presenting a brief history of the idea of a human right to an adequate environment as it has evolved in the United Nations documents, I assess this approach to our moral responsibility with regard to the environment. I argue that although this rights approach has some substantial weaknesses, these are outweighed by such clear advantages as its action-guiding nature and its political potency.
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  30. William Aiken (1985). Naked Emperors: Essays of a Taboo-Stalker. Environmental Ethics 7 (1):75-79.
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  31. Scott F. Aikin (2008). The Dogma of Environmental Revelation. Ethics and the Environment 13 (2):pp. 23-34.
    Environmental revelationism is the view that there are preferred means of knowing the value and structure of nature, and these means are characterized by experiences of awe or ceremonial feelings of reverence. This paper outlines the dogmatic consequences of this view.
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  32. Timo Airaksinen (1988). Original Populations and Environmental Rights. Journal of Applied Philosophy 5 (1):37-47.
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  33. Stuart C. Aitken (2001). Fielding Diversity and Moral Integrity. Ethics, Place and Environment 4 (2):125 – 129.
    This paper outlines some of the moral issues I faced when working in the field with homeless children and children with cerebral palsy. Bill Bunge argues that the 'immediacy' of fieldwork requires that we divest ourselves of theoretical and philosophical pretensions to attend the urgency of our participants' context. I use personal examples of powerful and contradictory experiences from working with young people in the field to highlight the importance of a moral integrity that recognizes vulnerability and the needs of (...)
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  34. Stuart Aitken, Anne Boddington, Simon Catling, David Chapin, Reg Cline-Cole, Cedric Cullingford, Michel Dion, Marcus Doel, Ray Gambell & Rita Gardner (1999). Referees for Ethics, Place And. Ethics, Place and Environment 2 (2).
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  35. Abraham Akkerman (2009). Urban Void and the Deconstruction of Neo-Platonic City-Form. Ethics, Place and Environment 12 (2):205 – 218.
    Urban void sometimes amplifies alienation within urban space, and thus leads the way to the human craving for authenticity. Juxtaposing urban void with the conventional notion of urban objects, furthermore, conforms to Nietzsche's distinction between Dionysian and Apollonian deportment. The Apollonian is at the founding of the Platonic myth of the Ideal City and its modern descendant, the myth of the Rational City. Modern urban planning has been object-directed and, consistent with the historical trend since the Renaissance, has become a (...)
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  36. Ulysses Paulino Albuquerque (2011). Local Perception of Environmental Change in a Semi-Arid Area of Northeast Brazil: A New Approach for the Use of Participatory Methods at the Level of Family Units. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (5):511-531.
    The diversity of plant resources in the Brazilian semi-arid region is being compromised by practices related to agriculture, pastures, and forest harvesting, especially in areas containing Caatinga vegetation (xeric shrublands and thorn forests). The impact of these practices constitutes a series of complex factors involving local issues, creating a need for further scientific studies on the social-environmental dynamics of natural resource use. Through participatory methods, the present study analyzed people’s representations about local environmental change processes in the Brazilian semi-arid region, (...)
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  37. Ulysses Albuquerque, Luciana Sousa Nascimento, Fabio Vieira, Cybelle Almeida, Marcelo Ramos & Ana Silva (2012). “Return” and Extension Actions After Ethnobotanical Research: The Perceptions and Expectations of a Rural Community in Semi-Arid Northeastern Brazil. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (1):19-32.
    The scientific community has debated the importance of “return” activities after ethnobiological studies. This issue has provoked debate because it touches on the ethics of research and the relationships with the people involved in these studies. This case study aimed to investigate community perception of an ethnobotany research project that was carried out in the semi-arid region of northeastern Brazil. Furthermore, we reported how the residents of this rural community felt about participating in the activities of “return” that arose from (...)
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  38. Donald Alexander (1990). Bioregionalism: Science or Sensibility? Environmental Ethics 12 (2):161-173.
    The current interest in bioregionalism, stimulated in part by Kirkpatrick Sale’s Dwellers in the Land, shows that people are looking for a form of political praxis which addresses the importance of region. In this paper, I argue that much of the bioregional literature written to date mystifies the concept of region, discounting the role of subjectivity and culture in shaping regional boundaries and veers toward asimplistic view of “nature knows best.” Bioregionalism can be rehabilitated, provided we treat it not as (...)
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  39. Samuel Alexander (2013). Voluntary Simplicity and the Social Reconstruction of Law: Degrowth From the Grassroots Up. Environmental Values 22 (2):287-308.
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  40. Anne Algers, Berner Lindström & Edmond Pajor (2011). A New Format for Learning About Farm Animal Welfare. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (4):367-379.
    Farm animal welfare is a knowledge domain that can be regarded as a model for new ways of organizing learning and making higher education more responsive to the needs of society. Global concern for animal welfare has resulted in a great demand for knowledge. As a complement to traditional education in farm animal welfare, higher education can be more demand driven and look at a broad range of methods to make knowledge available. The result of an inventory on farm animal (...)
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  41. Colin Allen (2013). Fish Cognition and Consciousness. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (1):25-39.
    Questions about fish consciousness and cognition are receiving increasing attention. In this paper, I explain why one must be careful to avoid drawing conclusions too hastily about this hugely diverse set of species.
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  42. Colin Allen (2001). [Book Chapter] (in Press).
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  43. Colin Allen (1997). The Discovery of Animal Consciousness: An Optimistic Assessment. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 10 (3):217-225.
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  44. Ben Almassi (2012). Climate Change, Epistemic Trust, and Expert Trustworthiness. Ethics and the Environment 17 (2):29-49.
    The evidence most of us have for our beliefs on global climate change, the extent of human contribution to it, and appropriate anticipatory and mitigating actions turns crucially on epistemic trust. We extend trust or distrust (or refrain from extending either) to many varied others: scientists performing original research, intergovernmental agencies and those reviewing research, think tanks offering critique and advocating skepticism, journalists transmitting and interpreting claims, even social systems of modern science such as peer-reviewed publication and grant allocation. Our (...)
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  45. Ben Almassi (2011). The Consequences of Individual Consumption: A Defence of Threshold Arguments for Vegetarianism and Consumer Ethics. Journal of Applied Philosophy 28 (4):396-411.
    As a moral foundation for vegetarianism and other consumer choices, act consequentialism can be appealing. When we justify our consumer and dietary choices this way, however, we face the problem that our individual actions rarely actually precipitate more just agricultural and economic practices. This threshold or individual impotence problem engaged by consequentialist vegetarians and their critics extends to morally motivated consumer decision-making more generally, anywhere a lag persists between individual moral actions taken and systemic moral progress made. Regan and others (...)
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  46. Hugo Fjelsted Alrøe & Erik Steen Kristensen (2003). Toward a Systemic Ethic. Environmental Ethics 25 (1):59-78.
    There are many different meanings of sustainability and precaution and no evident connection between the new normative concepts and the traditional moral theories. We seek an ethical basis for sustainability and precaution—a common framework that can serve as a means of resolving the conceptual ambiguities of the new normative concepts and the conflicts between new and traditional moralconcepts and theories. We employ a systemic approach to analyze the past and possible future extension of ethics and establish an inclusive framework of (...)
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  47. Hugo Fjelsted Alrøe, Mette Vaarst & Erik Steen Kristensen (2001). Does Organic Farming Face Distinctive Livestock Welfare Issues? – A Conceptual Analysis. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 14 (3):275-299.
    The recent development and growth oforganic livestock farming and the relateddevelopment of national and internationalregulations has fueled discussions amongscientists and philosophers concerning theproper conceptualization of animal welfare.These discussions on livestock welfare inorganic farming draw on the conventionaldiscussions and disputes on animal welfare thatinvolve issues such as different definitions ofwelfare (clinical health, absence of suffering,sum of positive and negative experiences,etc.), the possibility for objective measuresof animal welfare, and the acceptable level ofwelfare. It seems clear that livestock welfareis a value-laden concept and (...)
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  48. Peter Alward (2000). The Naïve Argument Against Moral Vegetarianism. Environmental Values 9 (1):81 - 89.
    The naïve argument against moral vegetarianism claims that if it is wrong for us to eat meant then it is wrong for lions and tigers to do so as well. I argue that the fact that such carnivores lack higher order mental states and need meat to survive do suffice to undermine the naive argument.
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  49. Yuichiro Amekawa (2009). Reflections on the Growing Influence of Good Agricultural Practices in the Global South. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (6):531-557.
    EurepGAP is a pioneering field level food safety protocol called ‘good agricultural practices’ currently exercising influence over the global food quality assurance system. Developed by a consortium of major European retailers, this private standard enforces codes of conduct that address issues of health and safety for producers and consumers, as well as working conditions and environmental management on the farmland. Despite various merits and benefits that the standard is premised to offer, the institutional design gives a financial edge to powerful (...)
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  50. Roger T. Ames (1986). Taoism and the Nature of Nature. Environmental Ethics 8 (4):317-350.
    The problems of environmental ethics are so basic that the exploration of an alternative metaphysics or attendant ethical theory is not a sufficiently radical solution. In fact, the assumptions entailed in adefinition of systematic philosophy that gives us a tradition of metaphysics might themselves be the source of the current crisis. We might need to revision the responsibilities of the philosopher and think in terms of the artist rather than the “scientific of first principles.” Taoism proceeds from art rather than (...)
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