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  1. Mark A. Michael (2003). What's In a Name? Pragmatism, Essentialism, and Environmental Ethics. Environmental Values 12 (3):361-379.
    Essentialists like J. Baird Callicott have argued that one cannot have an environmental ethic unless one adopts the nonanthropocentric principle, which holds that things other than humans can be morally considerable in their own right, typically because they are thought to be intrinsically valuable. Pragmatists like Bryan Norton reject this; they claim that environmental ethics has no core or essence, and hence that the nonanthropocentric principle is not essential to an environmental ethic. Norton advances as an alternative the Convergence Hypothesis, (...)
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  2. E. Aaltola (2002). 'Other Animal Ethics' and the Demand for Difference. Environmental Values 11 (2):193-209.
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  3. E. Aaltola & M. Oksanen (2002). Species Conservation and Minority Rights: The Case of Springtime Bird Hunting in Aland. Environmental Values 11 (4):443-460.
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  4. Elisa Aaltola (2010). Animal Ethics and the Argument From Absurdity. Environmental Values 19 (1):79-98.
    Arguments for the inherent value, equality of interests,or rights of non-human animals have presented a strong challenge for the anthropocentric worldview. However, they have been met with criticism.One form of criticism maintains that,regardless of their theoretical consistency,these 'pro-animal arguments' cannot be accepted due to their absurdity. Often, particularly inter-species interest conflicts are brought to the fore: if pro-animal arguments were followed,we could not solve interest conflicts between species,which is absurd. Because of this absurdity, the arguments need to be abandoned. The (...)
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  5. Elisa Aaltola (2010). Animal Ethics and the Argument From Absurdity. Environmental Values 19 (1):79-98.
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  6. Elisa Aaltola (2010). The Anthropocentric Paradigm and the Posibility of Animal Ethics. Ethics and the Environment 15 (1):pp. 27-50.
    Animal ethics has presented various 'pro-animal arguments' according to which non-human animals have a more significant moral status than traditionally assumed. Although these arguments (brought forward, for instance, by Peter Singer, Tom Regan, Mary Midgley, Stephen Clark, and Mark Rowlands) have been met with various forms of criticism, a quick overview of animal ethics literature suggests that they are difficult to overcome. Pro-animal arguments seem to have consistency and argumentative support on their side. However, recently a new type of criticism (...)
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  7. Elisa Aaltola (2002). Other Animal Ethics and the Demand for Difference. Environmental Values 11 (2):193-209.
    Traditionally animal ethics has criticised the anthropocentric worldview according to which humans differ categorically from the rest of the nature in some morally relevant way. It has claimed that even though there are differences, there are also crucial similarities between humans and animals that make it impossible to draw a categorical distinction between humans who are morally valuable and animals which are not. This argument, according to which animals and humans share common characteristics that lead to moral value, is at (...)
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  8. Marianne Aasen & Arild Vatn (2013). Deliberation on GMOs: A Study of How a Citizens' Jury Affects the Citizens' Attitudes. Environmental Values 22 (4):461-481.
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  9. Cheryl E. Abbate (2015). Comparing Lives and Epistemic Limitations: A Critique of Regan's Lifeboat From An Unprivileged Position. Ethics and the Environment 20 (1):1-21.
    In The Case for Animal Rights, Tom Regan argues that although all subjects-of-a-life have equal inherent value, there are often differences in the value of lives. According to Regan, lives that have the highest value are lives which have more possible sources of satisfaction. Regan claims that the highest source of satisfaction, which is available to only rational beings, is the satisfaction associated with thinking impartially about moral choices. Since rational beings can bring impartial reasons to bear on decision making, (...)
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  10. Edward Abbey (1983). Earth First! And the Monkey Wrench Gang. Environmental Ethics 5 (1):94-95.
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  11. Ruth Abbey (2007). Rawlsian Resources for Animal Ethics. Ethics and the Environment 12 (1):1-22.
    : This article considers what contribution the work of John Rawls can make to questions about animal ethics. It argues that there are more normative resources in A Theory of Justice for a concern with animal welfare than some of Rawls's critics acknowledge. However, the move from A Theory of Justice to Political Liberalism sees a depletion of normative resources in Rawlsian thought for addressing animal ethics. The article concludes by endorsing the implication of A Theory of Justice that we (...)
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  12. Norman Abeles (1996). Book Review. [REVIEW] Ethics and Behavior 6 (1):71 – 74.
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  13. Virginia Deane Abernethy (2001). Carrying Capacity: The Tradition and Policy Implications of Limits. Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics 2001:9-18.
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  14. David Abram (2008). Between the Body and the Breathing Earth. Environmental Ethics 27 (2):171-190.
    I take issue with several themes in Ted Toadvine’s lively paper, “Limits of the Flesh,” suggesting that he has significantly misread many of the arguments in The Spell of the Sensuous. I first engage his contention that I disparage reflection and denigrate the written word. Then I take up the assertion that I exclude the symbolic dimension of experience from my account, and indeed that I seek to eliminate the symbolic from our interactions with others. Finally, I refute his claim (...)
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  15. David Abram (2005). Between the Body and the Breathing Earth: A Reply to Ted Toadvine. Environmental Ethics 27 (2):171-190.
    I take issue with several themes in Ted Toadvine’s lively paper, “Limits of the Flesh,” suggesting that he has significantly misread many of the arguments in The Spell of the Sensuous. I first engage his contention that I disparage reflection and denigrate the written word. Then I take up the assertion that I exclude the symbolic dimension of experience from my account, and indeed that I seek to eliminate the symbolic from our interactions with others. Finally, I refute his claim (...)
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  16. David Abram (1988). Merleau-Ponty and the Voice of the Earth. Environmental Ethics 10 (2):101-120.
    Ecologists and environmental theorists have paid little attention to our direct, sensory experience of the enveloping world. In this paper I discuss the importance of such experience for ecological philosophy. Merleau-Ponty’s careful phenomenology of perceptual experience shows perception to be an inherently creative, participatory activity-a sort of conversation, carried on underneath our spoken discourse, between the living body and its world. His later work discloses the character of language itself as a medium born of the body’s participation with a world (...)
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  17. David Abrams (2001). A Reply to “Phenomenology Versus Pragmatism”. Environmental Ethics 23 (3):335-336.
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  18. David Abrams (2001). A Reply to “Phenomenology Versus Pragmatism”. Environmental Ethics 23 (3):335-336.
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  19. Sumaia Ma Abukashawa (forthcoming). The Eco-Sustainability Monthly Forum (15) UNESCO/Cousteau Ecotechnie Chair in Computer Man College for Computer Studies. Environmental Ethics.
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  20. Ralph and Christa Acampora (ed.) (2003). A Nietzschean Bestiary: Becoming Animal Beyond Docile and Brutal. Rowman and Littlefield.
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  21. M. Acutt & P. Mason (2000). Environmental Valuation, Economic Policy and Sustainability. Environmental Values 9 (4):537-538.
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  22. B. Adam (1999). Industrial Food for Thought: Timescapes of Risk. Environmental Values 8 (2):219-238.
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  23. Barbara Adam (1999). Industrial Food for Thought: Timescapes of Risk. Environmental Values 8 (2):219-238.
    This paper explores the temporal dimension of risks associated with the production, trade and consumption of food. The paper operates at many levels of substantive and theoretical analysis: it focuses on problems for understanding and action that arise from the invisibility of the hazards, explores the effects of those hazards on consumers and sets out the differences in risks that are faced by farmers, processors, traders and consumers. With its emphasis on that which tends to be disattended in conventional social (...)
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  24. Jane Adams (2005). Class: An Essential Aspect of Watershed Planning. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 18 (6):533-556.
    A study of a watershed planning process in the Cache River Watershed in southern Illinois revealed that class divisions, based on property ownership, underlay key conflicts over land use and decision-making relevant to resource use. A class analysis of the region indicates that the planning process served to endorse and solidify the locally-dominant theory that landownership confers the right to govern. This obscured the class differences between large full-time farmers and small-holders whose livelihood depends on non-farm labor. These (...)
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  25. John Adams (1996). Risk. Environmental Values 5 (2):181-182.
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  26. John Adams (1993). The Emperor's Old Clothes:The Curious Comeback of Cost-Benefit Analysis. Environmental Values 2 (3):247-260.
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  27. John Adams (1993). The Emperor's Old Clothes: The Curious Comeback of Cost-Benefit Analysis. Environmental Values 2 (3):247 - 260.
    Cost-benefit analysis is enjoying a resurgence. Despite its well documented failures in the past to cope with the environmental damage caused by major transport projects, and despite lack of progress in resolving the causes of these failures, Britain's Department of the Environment now proposes to apply it not just to projects, but to the formulation of policy. Curious.
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  28. Paul C. Adams (2007). Introduction to 'Technological Change': A Special Issue of Ethics, Place & Environment. Ethics, Place and Environment 10 (1):1 – 6.
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  29. W. Adams (1996). Future Nature: A Vision for Conservation. Environmental Values 5 (4):369-371.
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  30. Tim Adamson (2005). Measure for Measure: The Reliance of Human Knowledge on the Things of the World. Ethics and the Environment 10 (2):175-194.
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  31. Tim Adamson (2005). Measure for Measure:The Reliance of Human Knowledge on the Things of the World. Ethics and the Environment 10 (2):175-194.
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  32. Adesoji O. Adelaja & Robin G. Brumfield (1991). Research Note on Equity and Ethics in State-Promotion of Agricultural Products. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 4 (1):82-88.
    Many state governments in the United States promote locally-produced farm products. This paper discusses issues related to the ethics and equity of such promotional programs. The paper argues that generic promotion is generally easier to justify in terms of ethics and equity than brand promotion. It also argues that informative and factual brand promotions are easier to justify than deceptive and persuasive brand promotions. Additional equity issues arising when taxpayers finance state-promotional programs are also discussed.
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  33. Adesoji Adelaja, Donn Derr & Karen Rose-Tank (1989). Economic and Equity Implications of Land-Use Zoning in Suburban Agriculture. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 2 (2):97-112.
    A cash-flow viability model is used to evaluate the impacts of land-use zoning on farm households in New Jersey. Findings suggest that zoning results in increased production expenses, lower efficiency and profitability, and the devaluation of land assets. Cash flow and economic viability are, thus, reduced. Impacts of zoning on farm incomes, off-farm incomes, revenues from land sales, indebtedness, and farm sizes were not statistically significant. The results suggest that the use of land-use zoning statutes to guarantee the existence of (...)
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  34. Ademola A. Adenle (2014). Stakeholders' Perceptions of GM Technology in West Africa: Assessing the Responses of Policymakers and Scientists in Ghana and Nigeria. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (2):241-263.
    The perception of two key stakeholders such as policymakers and scientists on genetic modification (GM) technology was examined in Ghana and Nigeria using semi-structured interviews. A total sample of 20 policymakers (16 at ministries and 4 at parliament/cabinet) and 58 scientists (43 at research institutes and 15 at universities) participated at the interviews. This study revealed respondents perspectives on potential benefits and risks of GM technology, status and development of biosafety regulatory frameworks, role of science and technology innovation in agricultural (...)
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  35. W. Adger & K. Brown (1997). Land Use and the Causes of Global Warming. Environmental Values 6 (3):366-367.
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  36. Maniklal Adhikary & Samrat Chowdhury (2010). The Aim of This Paper is to Bring Out the Effect of Economic Reforms Introduced in India on the Direction of Virtual Water Trade (Through Trade of Agricultural Products). The Study Also Identifies the Dual Role That Virtual Water has in an Economy. It is a Source of Export Earnings (Benefit Side), but at the Same Time There is a Loss of Virtual Water (Cost Side) Through Agricultural Trade. The Study is Novel in the Sense That It Not Only Identifies the Trade-Off Between Benefits and Costs of Virtual ... [REVIEW] Environmental Values 19 (1):33-56.
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  37. Maniklal Adhikary & Samrat Chowdhury (2010). Virtual Water Trade, Sustainability and Territorial Equity Across Phases of Globalisation in India. Environmental Values 19 (1):33 - 56.
    The aim of this paper is to bring out the effect of economic reforms introduced in India on the direction of virtual water trade (through trade of agricultural products). The study also identifies the dual role that virtual water has in an economy. It is a source of export earnings (benefit side), but at the same time there is a loss of virtual water (cost side) through agricultural trade. The study is novel in the sense that it not only identifies (...)
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  38. Jonathan H. Adler (2012). Is the Common Law a Free-Market Solution to Pollution? Critical Review 24 (1):61-85.
    Whereas conventional analyses characterize environmental problems as examples of market failure, proponents of free-market environmentalism (FME) consider the problem to be a lack of markets and, in particular, a lack of enforceable and exchangeable property rights. Enforcing property rights alleviates disputes about, as well as the overuse of, most natural resources. FME diagnoses of pollution are much weaker, however. Most FME proponents suggest that common-law tort suits can adequately protect private property and ecological resources from pollution. Yet such claims have (...)
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  39. Stefan Aerts, Dirk Lips, Stuart Spencer, Eddy Decuypere & Johan De Tavernier (2006). A New Framework for the Assessment of Animal Welfare: Integrating Existing Knowledge From a Practical Ethics Perspective. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 19 (1):67-76.
    When making an assessment of animal welfare, it is important to take environmental (housing) or animal-based parameters into account. An alternative approach is to focus on the behavior and appearance of the animal, without making actual measurements or quantifying this. None of these tell the whole story. In this paper, we suggest that it is possible to find common ground between these (seemingly) diametrically opposed positions and argue that this may be the way to deal with the complexity of animal (...)
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  40. John Agnew, Ash Amin, Jacqui Burgess, Robert Chambers, Graham Chapman, Denis Cosgrove, Gouranga Dasvarma, Klaus Dodds, Sally Eden & Nick Entrikin (1998). Referees for Ethics, Place and Environment, Volume 1, 1998. Ethics, Place and Environment 1 (2):269.
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  41. Mercè Agüera-Cabo (2006). Gender, Values and Power in Local Environmental Conflicts: The Case of Grassroots Organisations in North Catalonia. Environmental Values 15 (4):479-504.
    Not much attention has been paid to gender in environmental management and decision-making. This article explores how a gender dimension can contribute to the environmental debate by means of a comparative study of three environmental grassroots organisations in the North of Catalonia. The study shows that gender is significant for distinguishing different priorities between women and men in local conflicts and in environmental interests in general. The analysis of unequal power relations between genders in grassroots organisations leads us to discuss (...)
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  42. Merce Aguera-Cabo (2006). Gender, Values and Power in Local Environmental Conflicts: The Case of Grassroots Organisations in North Catalonia. Environmental Values 15 (4):479-504.
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  43. Mélanie Ahkin (2010). Human Centrism, Animist Materialism, And The Critique Of Rationalism In Val Plumwood's Critical Ecological Feminism. Emergent Australasian Philosophers 3 (1).
    Val Plumwood's critical ecological feminism proposes a theorisation of the conceptual and logical foundations underlying the oppressions of women and nature within dominant western philosophical traditions, and a challenge to the dominant rationalist framework of mastery to which these oppressions are attributed. The present paper proposes, firstly, to expound the trajectory and development of CEF through Plumwood's body of work. Secondly, it will defend CEF from objections proposed by John Andrews, including that the critique of dualism fails to prove the (...)
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  44. Marko Ahteensuu (2012). Assumptions of the Deficit Model Type of Thinking: Ignorance, Attitudes, and Science Communication in the Debate on Genetic Engineering in Agriculture. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (3):295-313.
    This paper spells out and discusses four assumptions of the deficit model type of thinking. The assumptions are: First, the public is ignorant of science. Second, the public has negative attitudes towards (specific instances of) science and technology. Third, ignorance is at the root of these negative attitudes. Fourth, the public’s knowledge deficit can be remedied by one-way science communication from scientists to citizens. It is argued that there is nothing wrong with ignorance-based explanations per se. Ignorance accounts at least (...)
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  45. Marko Ahteensuu & Susanna Lehvävirta (2014). Assisted Migration, Risks and Scientific Uncertainty, and Ethics: A Comment on Albrecht Et Al.'S Review Paper. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (3):471-477.
    In response to Albrecht et al.’s (J Agric Environ Ethics 26(4):827–845, 2013) discussion on the ethics of assisted migration, we emphasize the issues of risk and scientific uncertainty as an inextricable part of a comprehensive ethical evaluation. Insisting on a separation of risk and ethical considerations, although arguably common in many policy contexts, is at best misguided and at worst damaging.
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  46. Marko Ahteensuu & Helena Siipi (2009). A Critical Assessment of Public Consultations on GMOs in the European Union. Environmental Values 18 (2):129-152.
    The paper highlights shortcomings in the public consultation practices on the deliberate release and placing on the market of GMOs in the European Union and in one of its member countries, Finland. It is argued that current GMO consultation practices do not meet the aims and objectives on which their introduction is typically justified. Specifically, they do not serve democracy, increase consensus, enable better decisions to be made, or establish trust. We conclude that there is a clear need for the (...)
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  47. Scott F. Aiken (2009). The Significance of Al Gore's Purported Hypocrisy. Environmental Ethics 31 (1):111-112.
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  48. William Aiken (1992). Human Rights in an Ecological Era. Environmental Values 1 (3):191 - 203.
    After presenting a brief history of the idea of a human right to an adequate environment as it has evolved in the United Nations documents, I assess this approach to our moral responsibility with regard to the environment. I argue that although this rights approach has some substantial weaknesses, these are outweighed by such clear advantages as its action-guiding nature and its political potency.
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  49. William Aiken (1985). Naked Emperors: Essays of a Taboo-Stalker. Environmental Ethics 7 (1):75-79.
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  50. Scott F. Aikin (2008). The Dogma of Environmental Revelation. Ethics and the Environment 13 (2):pp. 23-34.
    Environmental revelationism is the view that there are preferred means of knowing the value and structure of nature, and these means are characterized by experiences of awe or ceremonial feelings of reverence. This paper outlines the dogmatic consequences of this view.
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