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  1. Elisa Aaltola (2010). Animal Ethics and the Argument From Absurdity. Environmental Values 19 (1):79-98.
    Arguments for the inherent value, equality of interests,or rights of non-human animals have presented a strong challenge for the anthropocentric worldview. However, they have been met with criticism.One form of criticism maintains that,regardless of their theoretical consistency,these 'pro-animal arguments' cannot be accepted due to their absurdity. Often, particularly inter-species interest conflicts are brought to the fore: if pro-animal arguments were followed,we could not solve interest conflicts between species,which is absurd. Because of this absurdity, the arguments need to be abandoned. The (...)
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  2. Arun Agrawal (2010). Environment, Community, Government. In Ilana Feldman & Miriam Iris Ticktin (eds.), In the Name of Humanity: The Government of Threat and Care. Duke University Press.
  3. Scott F. Aikin (2006). Democratic Deliberation, Public Reason, and Environmental Politics. Environmental Philosophy 3 (2):52-58.
    The activity of democratic deliberation is governed by the norm of public reason – namely, that reasons justifying public policy must both be pursuant of shared goods and be shareable by all reasonable discussants. Environmental policies based on controversial theories of value, as a consequence, are in danger of breaking the rule that would legitimate their enforcement.
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  4. Peter S. Alagona, John Sandlos & Yolanda F. Wiersma (2012). Past Imperfect. Environmental Philosophy 9 (1):49-70.
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  5. Peter Alagona & Gregory Simon (2012). Leave No Trace Starts at Home: A Response to Critics and Vision for the Future. Ethics, Policy and Environment 15 (1):119 - 124.
    Ethics, Policy & Environment, Volume 15, Issue 1, Page 119-124, March 2012.
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  6. Peter Allen (2000). Knowledge, Ignorance and the Evolution of Complex Systems. World Futures 55 (1):37-70.
    The paper explores the basis for decision?making and policy with regard to the Environment. Clearly these should be based on knowledge of possible consequences and accompanying risk assessments involving the linked behaviour of the many interacting human actors within a socio?economic system and the ecological, and physical systems in which they are embedded. The paper describes the Complex Systems approach to these problems, showing the kind of models that are required in order to obtain whatever limited knowledge is possible about (...)
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  7. Matthew C. Ally (2013). Ecologizing Sartre's Ontology. Environmental Philosophy 9 (2):95-121.
    I argue that Sartre’s philosophy can be both broadened in its aspirations and deepened in its implications through dialogue with the life sciences. Section 1 introduces the philosophical terrain. Section 2 explores Sartre’s evolving understanding of nature and human relations with nature. Section 3 explores Sartre’s perspectives on scientific inquiry, natural history, and dialectical reason. Section 4 outlines recent developments in the life sciences that bear directly on Sartre’s quiet curiosity about a naturalistic dialectics. Section 5 suggests how these developments (...)
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  8. Matthew C. Ally (2012). Ecologizing Sartre's Ontology: Nature, Science, and Dialectics. Environmental Philosophy 9 (2):95-121.
    I argue that Sartre’s philosophy can be both broadened in its aspirations and deepened in its implications through dialogue with the life sciences. Section 1 introduces the philosophical terrain. Section 2 explores Sartre’s evolving understanding of nature and human relations with nature. Section 3 explores Sartre’s perspectives on scientific inquiry, natural history, and dialectical reason. Section 4 outlines recent developments in the life sciences that bear directly on Sartre’s quiet curiosity about a naturalistic dialectics. Section 5 suggests how these developments (...)
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  9. Erik Anderson (2010). Ethics Commands, Aesthetics Demands. Environmental Philosophy 7 (2):115-133.
    I identify a commonly held position in environmental philosophy, “the received view,” and argue that its proponents beg the question when challenged to demonstrate the relevance of environmental aesthetics for environmental justice. I call this “the inference problem,” and I go on to argue that an alternative to the received view, Arnold Berleant’s participatory engagement model, is better equipped to meet the challenge it poses. By adopting an alternative metaphysics, the engagement model supplies a solution to the inference problem and (...)
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  10. Terry L. Anderson & Donald R. Leal (forthcoming). Free Market Versus Political Environmentalism. Environmental Philosophy.
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  11. Terry L. Anderson & Donald R. Leal (1994). Freedom and the Environment: Reply to Critics. Critical Review 8 (3):461-465.
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  12. Lida Anestidou (2004). Commentary on “the Gladiator Sparrow: Ethical Issues in Behavioral Research on Captive Populations of Wild Animals”. Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (4):731-734.
    This case involves invasive research on captive wild populations of birds to study aggressive animal behavior. The case and associated commentaries raise and examine fundamental issues: whether and under what conditions, such research is ethically justified when the research has no expected, direct application to the human species; the moral status of animals and how one balances concern for the animal’s interests against the value of gains in scientific knowledge. They also emphasize the issue of the importance of a thorough (...)
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  13. Raymond Anthony (2014). Atmospheric Commons as a Public Trust Resource: The Common Heritage of MankindPrinciple in Dialogue with Duties of Citizenship. Ethics, Policy and Environment 17 (1):43-48.
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  14. N. Scott Arnold (2009). The Endangered Species Act, Regulatory Takings, and Public Goods. Social Philosophy and Policy 26 (2):353-377.
    The Endangered Species Act (ESA) can impose significant limitations on what landowners may do with their property, especially as it pertains to development. These restrictions imposed by the ESA are part of a larger controversy about the reach of the of the Fifth Amendment, which says that private property shall not be taken for public use without just compensation. The question this paper addresses is whether these restrictions require compensation. The paper develops a position on the general question of compensation (...)
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  15. Maurice Ash (1992). The Fabric of the World: Towards a Philosophy of Environment. Green Books.
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  16. Christian Baatz (2014). Climate Change and Individual Duties to Reduce GHG Emissions. Ethics, Policy and Environment 17 (1):1-19.
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  17. Christian Baatz (2013). Responsibility for the Past? Some Thoughts on Compensating Those Vulnerable to Climate Change in Developing Countries. Ethics, Policy and Environment 16 (1):94-110.
    The first impacts of climate change have become evident and are expected to increase dramatically over the next decades. Thus, it becomes more and more pressing to decide who has to compensate those people who suffer from negative impacts of climate change but have neither contributed to the problem nor possess the resources to cope with the consequences. Since the frequently invoked Polluter Pays Principle cannot account for all climate-related harm, I will take a closer look at the much more (...)
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  18. Christiane Bailey (2011). Kinds of Life. On the Phenomenological Basis of the Distinction Between Higher and Lower Animals. Journal of Environmental Philosophy 8 (2):47-68.
    Drawing upon Husserl and Merleau-Ponty’s phenomenological constitution of the Other through Einfülhung, I argue that the hierarchical distinction between higher and lower animals – which has been dismissed by Heidegger for being anthropocentric – must not be conceived as an objective distinction between “primitive” animals and “more evolved” ones, but rather corresponds to a phenomenological distinction between familiar and unfamiliar animals.
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  19. Asoka Bandarage (2013). Sustainability and Well-Being: The Middle Path to Environment, Society, and the Economy. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Introduction : environment, society, and the economy -- Environmental, social, and economic collapse -- Evolution of the domination paradigm -- Ecological and social justice movements -- Ethical path to sustainability and well-being.
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  20. Melany Banks (2012). Human Engineering: Helpful or Unnecessary? Ethics, Policy and Environment 15 (2):227 - 229.
    Ethics, Policy & Environment, Volume 15, Issue 2, Page 227-229, June 2012.
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  21. Bryan E. Bannon (2011). Vibrant Matter. Environmental Philosophy 8 (1):121-124.
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  22. Pratima Bansal & Geoffrey Kistruck (2006). Seeing is (Not) Believing: Managing the Impressions of the Firm's Commitment to the Natural Environment. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 67 (2):165 - 180.
    This paper examines stakeholder responses to impression management tactics used by firms that express environmental commitment. We inductively analyzed data from 98 open-ended questionnaires and identified two impression management tactics that led respondents to believe that a firm was credible in its commitment to the natural environment. Approximately, half of the respondents responded to illustrative impression management tactics that provide images of, and/or broad-brush comments about, the firm’s commitment to the natural environment. The other half responded to demonstrative impression management (...)
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  23. Renaud Barbaras (2014). Exodus and Exile. Environmental Philosophy 11 (1):45-57.
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  24. Pierluigi Barrotta (2012). James Lovelock, Gaia Theory, and the Rejection of Fact/Value Dualism. Environmental Philosophy 8 (2):95-113.
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  25. John Barry (2009). Ecological Politics and Democratic Theory: The Challenge to the Deliberative Ideal. Contemporary Political Theory 8 (1):115.
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  26. John Barry (2007). Environment and Social Theory. Routledge.
    Environment and Social Theory provides a concise introduction to the relationship between the environment and social theory, both historically and within contemporary social theory.
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  27. Christian Becker & Donald Brown (2013). Introduction to the Special Section: Integrating Development Ethics and Climate Change Ethics. Ethics, Policy and Environment 16 (1):37-42.
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  28. Wilfred Beckerman (1997). Debate: Intergenerational Equity and the Environment. Journal of Political Philosophy 5 (4):392–405.
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  29. Nathan M. Bell (2012). Forrest Clingerman and Mark H. Dixon, Editors. Placing Nature on the Borders of Religion, Philosophy and Ethics. Environmental Philosophy 9 (2):201-204.
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  30. Robin Bellows (2004). Courtyards. Environmental Philosophy 1 (2):62-64.
    This essay is an edited version of a paper submitted for a third year, undergraduate course in Issues in Environmental Ethics, at the University of Toronto. The course aims to bring together thinking from the intersection of the fields of Continental and Environmental Philosophy.
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  31. Jeremy Bendik-Keymer (2014). Living Up to Our Humanity: The Elevated Extinction Rate Event and What It Says About Us. Ethics, Policy and Environment 17 (3):339-354.
    Either we are in an elevated extinction rate event or in a mass extinction. Scientists disagree, and the matter cannot be resolved empirically until it is too late. We are the cause of the elevated extinction rate. What does this say about us, we who are Homo sapiens?the wise hominid? Beginning with the Renaissance and spreading during the 18th century, the normative notion of humanity has arisen to stand for what expresses our dignity as humans?specifically our thoughtfulness, in the double (...)
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  32. Jeremy Bendik‐Keymer (2008). Dale Jamieson,Ethics and the Environment: An Introduction:Ethics and the Environment: An Introduction. Ethics 118 (4):731-734.
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  33. Jane Bennett (2004). The Force of Things: Steps Toward an Ecology of Matter. Political Theory 32 (3):347-372.
    This essay seeks to give philosophical expression to the vitality, willfullness, and recalcitrance possessed by nonhuman entities and forces. It also considers the ethico-political import of an enhanced awareness of "thing-power." Drawing from Lucretius, Spinoza, Gilles Deleuze, Bruno Latour, and others, it describes a materialism of lively matter, to be placed in conversation with the historical materialism of Marx and the body materialism of feminist and cultural studies. Thing-power materialism is a speculative onto-story, an admittedly presumptuous attempt to depict the (...)
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  34. Michael James Bennett (2012). Bergson's Environmental Aesthetic. Environmental Philosophy 9 (2):67-94.
    This paper investigates the connection between Henri Bergson’s biological epistemology and his moral theory. Specifically, it examines the distinction between the morality of what Bergson calls “closed” and “open” societies in his late work Two Sources of Morality and Religion (1932). I argue that “open” morality provides the moral correlate of a non-instrumentalizing orientation toward nature. Here Bergson’s thought is disposed toward a very specific kind of environmental ethic, an aesthetic one. Bergson’s characterization of open morality, especially in the image (...)
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  35. Raymond Benton Jr (2008). Business, Ethics, and the Environment. Business Ethics Quarterly 18 (4):567-581.
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  36. Ted Benton (2009). Darwin and Wallace as Environmental Philosophers. Environmental Values 18 (4):487 - 502.
    The thoughts of Darwin and Wallace on human evolution and the relations between humans and the rest of nature are compared. Despite significant differences, it is suggested both great evolutionists have much to offer in addressing our current socio-ecological predicament.
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  37. Arnold Berleant (2007). Aesthetics and Environment Reconsidered: Reply to Carlson. British Journal of Aesthetics 47 (3):315-318.
    Allen Carlson finds three central problems in my book, Aesthetics and Environment: that it lacks a criterion of the aesthetic itself, that my proposal, aesthetic engagement, is excessively subjective, and that we cannot therefore distinguish between ‘easy’ and ‘serious’ beauty. I respond by uncovering the metaphysical assumptions on which his critique rests and offer more plausible alternatives. I argue, further, that their implications are not only acceptable but fully satisfactory.
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  38. Arnold Berleant (2005). Aesthetics and Environment: Variations on a Theme. Ashgate Pub. Ltd..
    I: Environmental aesthetics -- A phenomenological aesthetics of environment -- Aesthetic dimensions of environmental design -- Down the garden path -- The wilderness city : a study of metaphorical experience -- Aesthetics of the coastal environment -- The world from the water -- Is there life in virtual space? -- Is greasy lake a place? -- Embodied music -- II: Social aesthetics -- The idea of a cultural aesthetic -- The social evaluation of art -- Subsidization of art as social (...)
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  39. Arnold Berleant (ed.) (2002). The Environment and the Arts. Ashgate Press.
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  40. Kirsty Best (2004). Interfacing the Environment: Networked Screens and the Ethics of Visual Consumption. Ethics and the Environment 9 (2):65-85.
    : The screen continues to be the primary generator of visual imagery in contemporary culture, including of the natural world. This paper examines the screen as visual interface in the construction and consumption of physical environments. Screens are increasingly incorporated in our daily habits and imbricated into our lives, especially as mediating technologies are embedded into the surfaces of our physical surroundings, shaping and molding our interactions with and perceptions of those environments. As screens become increasingly portable and digitized, they (...)
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  41. Sanjoy Bhattacharya (2003). From Foe to Friend: Geographical and Environmental Factors and the Control and Eradication of Smallpox in India. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 25 (3):299 - 317.
    Due to the highly visible nature of the disease, smallpox received a lot of attention from the colonial and independent Indian governments. An assessment of the changing official views about the impact of geographical and environmental factors on modes of variola causation and control presents insights into themes that are generally ignored in the existing historiography. Rather than being synchronised efforts, imposed top-down, provincial level officials in charge of running vaccination programmes were able to retain a great degree of autonomy (...)
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  42. Carol Bigwood (2004). Standing and Stooping to Tiny Flowers. Environmental Philosophy 1 (2):28-45.
    Throughout the paper, I intersperse intimate movement episodes where I respond through my body and personal self to Naess. In grounding his own ecosophy, Naess makes his stand on a very certain place high up in the mountains called “Tvergastein.” His ecosophy T springs directly from his personalhome. Engaging with his texts I find I am not merely immersed in the usual way into a symbolic realm of ideas detached from my body, but have the odd feeling that I must (...)
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  43. Étienne Bimbenet (2014). The Fallacy of Human Animality. Environmental Philosophy 11 (1):27-43.
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  44. Peter Blair (2009). Heidegger and Homecoming. Environmental Philosophy 6 (1):122-124.
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  45. Liliane Bodson (1998). Edited Volumes-le Statut Ethique de L'Animal: Conceptions Anciennes Et Nouvelles. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 20 (1):132-132.
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  46. Greg Bognar (2012). When Philosophers Shoot Themselves in the Leg. Ethics, Policy and Environment 15 (2):222 - 224.
    Ethics, Policy & Environment, Volume 15, Issue 2, Page 222-224, June 2012.
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  47. Keith Bosak (2010). Ecotourism as Environmental Justice? Discourse and the Politics of Scale in the Nanda Devi Biosphere Reserve, India. Environmental Philosophy 7 (2):49-74.
    This paper uses the case of the Nanda Devi Biosphere Reserve to illustrate how ecotourism can be a vehicle for environmental justice. I use discourse analysis and the politics of scale to argue that an expanded notion of environmental justice does account for the myriad movements for resource rights occurring all over the world. In this case, framing the struggle through ecotourism with a focus on social justice provided local people a way to engage the mainstream environmental movement and address (...)
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  48. Greg Bothun (2014). Do Anthropocentric Indirect Arguments Have Any Scientific Validity? A Commentary on Anthropocentric Indirect Arguments for Environmental Protection, by K. Elliot. Ethics, Policy and Environment 17 (3):275-278.
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  49. Paul Bowman (2014). Fair Shares and Decent Lives. Ethics, Policy and Environment 17 (1):24-26.
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  50. Emily Brady (2011). Adam Smith's ''Sympathetic Imagination'' and the Aesthetic Appreciation of Environment. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 9 (1):95-109.
    This paper explores the significance of Adam Smith's ideas for defending non-cognitivist theories of aesthetic appreciation of nature. Objections to non-cognitivism argue that the exercise of emotion and imagination in aesthetic judgement potentially sentimentalizes and trivializes nature. I argue that although directed at moral judgement, Smith's views also find a place in addressing this problem. First, sympathetic imagination may afford a deeper and more sensitive type of aesthetic engagement. Second, in taking up the position of the impartial spectator, aesthetic judgements (...)
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