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  1. John Ahier & John Beck (2003). Education and the Politics of Envy. British Journal of Educational Studies 51 (4):320 - 343.
    This paper addresses the somewhat neglected topic of envy and its relationship to education and social inequality in Britain. Drawing on the work of Rawls, Runciman and Crosland, the paper proposes a distinction between envy as a vice and 'justified resentment' aroused by perceived injustices in the social distribution of primary goods, including education. Various pejorative uses of the term 'the politics of envy' in UK politics are examined. The conditions necessary for a politics of justified resentment are then analysed. (...)
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  2. M. J. Alden (1994). Envy in Pindar. The Classical Review 44 (01):5-.
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  3. Lloyd W. J. Aultman-Moore (2008). Envy and Grace. Logos 11 (1).
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  4. Aaron Ben-Ze'ev (2002). Are Envy, Anger, and Resentment Moral Emotions? Philosophical Explorations 5 (2):148 – 154.
    The moral status of emotions has recently become the focus of various philosophical investigations. Certain emotions that have traditionally been considered as negative, such as envy, jealousy, pleasure-in-others'-misfortune, and pride, have been defended. Some traditionally "negative" emotions have even been declared to be moral emotions. In this brief paper, I suggest two basic criteria according to which an emotion might be considered moral, and I then examine whether envy, anger, and resentment are moral emotions.
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  5. Aaron Ben-Ze'ev (1992). Envy and Inequality. Journal of Philosophy 89 (11):551-581.
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  6. Aaron Ben-Ze'ev (1990). Envy and Jealousy. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 20 (4):487 - 516.
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  7. Aaron Ben-Ze’Ev (1993). Envy and Pity. International Philosophical Quarterly 33 (1):3-19.
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  8. Stephen M. Campbell (2013). An Analysis of Prudential Value. Utilitas 25 (03):334-54.
    This essay introduces and defends a new analysis of prudential value. According to this analysis, what it is for something to be good for you is for that thing to contribute to the appeal or desirability of being in your position. I argue that this proposal fits well with our ways of talking about prudential value and well-being; enables promising analyses of the related concepts of luck, selfishness, self-sacrifice, and paternalism; preserves the relationship between prudential value and the attitudes of (...)
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  9. Miriam Cohen Christofidis (2004). Talent, Slavery and Envy in Dworkin's Equality of Resources. Utilitas 16 (3):267-287.
    In this article I argue against Ronald Dworkin's rejection of the labour auction in his ‘Equality of Resources’. I criticize Dworkin's claims that the talented would envy the untalented in such an auction, and that the talented in particular would be enslaved by it. I identify some ways in which the talent auction is underdescribed and I compare the results for the condition of the talented of different further descriptions of it. I conclude that Dworkin's deviation from the ‘envy test’ (...)
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  10. Miriam Cohen Christofidis (2004). Talent, Slavery, and Envy. In Ronald Dworkin & Justine Burley (eds.), Dworkin and His Critics: With Replies by Dworkin. Blackwell Pub..
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  11. David E. Cooper (1982). Equality and Envy. Journal of Philosophy of Education 16 (1):35–47.
  12. Justin D'Arms, Envy. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  13. Justin D'Arms & Allison Kerr (2008). Envy in the Philosophical Tradition. In Richard Kim (ed.), Envy, Theory and Research. Oxford University Press. 39-59.
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  14. Joseph Epstein (2003). Envy: The Seven Deadly Sins. OUP.
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  15. Elaine Fantham (2005). Phthonos D. Konstan, N. K. Rutter (Edd.): Envy, Spite and Jealousy. The Rivalrous Emotions in Ancient Greece . (Edinburgh Leventis Studies 2.) Pp. Xiv + 305. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2003. Cased, £45. ISBN: 0-7846-1603-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 55 (01):180-.
  16. Keith Green (2007). Aquinas on Attachment, Envy, and Hatred in the "Summa Theologica". Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (3):403 - 428.
    This essay examines Aquinas's discussions of hatred in Summa Theologica I-II, Q. 29 and II-II, Q. 34, in order to retrieve an account of what contemporary theorists of the emotions call its cognitive contents. In Aquinas's view, hatred is constituted as a passion by a narrative pattern that includes its intentional object, beliefs, perceptions of changes in bodily states, and motivated desires. This essay endorses Aquinas's broadly "cognitivist" account of passional hatred, in line with his way of treating passions in (...)
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  17. Christine R. Harris & Nicole E. Henniger (2013). Envy, Politics, and Age. Frontiers in Psychology 4.
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  18. Joseph Heath (2006). Envy and Efficiency. Revue de Philosophie Économique 13.
    Joseph Heath1 The Pareto principle states that if a proposed change in the condition of society makes at least one person better off, and does not make anyone else worse off, then that change should be regarded as an improvement. This principle forms the conceptual core of modern welfare economics, and exercises enormous influence in contemporary discussions of justice and equality. It does, however, have an Achilles’ heel. When an individual experiences envy, it means that improvements in the condition of (...)
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  19. Thomas A. Horne (1981). Envy and Commercial Society: Mandeville and Smith on "Private Vices, Public Benefits". Political Theory 9 (4):551-569.
    Man [in commercial society] is sometimes found a detached and solitary being; he has found an object which sets him in competition with his fellow creatures, and he deals with them as he does with his cattle and his soil, for the sake of the profits they bring; the mighty engine which we suppose to have formed society, only tends to set its members at variance, or to continue their intercourse after the bonds of affection are broken.1.
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  20. Daniel Jacobson & Justin D'Arms (2005). Anthropocentric Constraints on Human Value. Oxford Studies in Metaethics 1:99-126.
    According to Cicero, “all emotions spring from the roots of error: they should not be pruned or clipped here and there, but yanked out” (Cicero 2002: 60). The Stoic enthusiasm for the extirpation of emotion is radical in two respects, both of which can be expressed with the claim that emotional responses are never appropriate. First, the Stoics held that emotions are incompatible with virtue , since the virtuous man will retain his equanimity whatever his fate. Grief is always vicious, (...)
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  21. David Kovacs (2007). Envy and Akrasia in Seneca's Thyestes. Classical Quarterly 57 (02).
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  22. Marguerite la Caze (2002). Revaluing Envy and Resentment. Philosophical Explorations 5 (2):155 – 158.
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  23. Marguerite La Caze (2001). Envy and Resentment. Philosophical Explorations 4 (1):31 – 45.
    Envy and resentment are generally thought to be unpleasant and unethical emotions which ought to be condemned. I argue that both envy and resentment, in some important forms, are moral emotions connected with concern for justice, understood in terms of desert and entitlement. They enable us to recognise injustice, work as a spur to acting against it and connect us to others. Thus, we should accept these emotions as part of the ethical life.
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  24. Mike McNamee (2003). Schadenfreude in Sport: Envy, Justice, and Self-Esteem. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 30 (1):1-16.
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  25. Maria Miceli & Cristiano Castelfranchi (2007). The Envious Mind. Cognition and Emotion 21 (3):449-479.
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  26. Richard Norman (2002). Equality, Envy, and the Sense of Injustice. Journal of Applied Philosophy 19 (1):43–54.
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  27. Michael Otsuka (2004). Liberty, Equality, Envy, and Abstraction. In Ronald Dworkin & Justine Burley (eds.), Dworkin and His Critics: With Replies by Dworkin. Blackwell Pub.. 70--78.
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  28. Timothy Perrine (2011). Envy and Self-Worth. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 85 (3):433-446.
    In the Summa Theologiae, Aquinas offers an adept account of the vice of envy. Despite the virtues of his account, he nevertheless fails to provide an adequatedefinition of the vice. Instead, he offers two different definitions each of which fails to identify what is common to all cases of envy. Here I supplement Aquinas’saccount by providing what I take to be common to all cases of envy. I argue that what is common is a “perception of inferiority”—when a person perceives (...)
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  29. Timothy Perrine & Kevin Timpe (forthcoming). Envy and Its Discontents. In Kevin Timpe & Craig Boyd (eds.), Virtues and Their Vices. Oxford University Press. 225-244.
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  30. Luke Purshouse (2004). Jealousy in Relation to Envy. Erkenntnis 60 (2):179-205.
    The conceptions of jealousy used by philosophical writers are various, and, this paper suggests, largely inadequate. In particular, the difference between jealousy and envy has not yet been plausibly specified. This paper surveys some past analyses of this distinction and addresses problems with them, before proposing its own positive account of jealousy, developed from an idea of Leila Tov-Ruach(a.k.a. A. O. Rorty). Three conditions for being jealous are proposed and it is shownhow each of them helps to tell the emotion (...)
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  31. Solomon Schimmel (1997). The Seven Deadly Sins: Jewish, Christian, and Classical Reflections on Human Psychology. OUP USA.
    All of us are engaged in a personal, ongoing battle with sin and vice. The seven deadly sins - lust, greed, envy, anger, pride, gluttony, and sloth - are our main antagonists in this struggle. They are primary causes of unhappiness and immorality, and because of their pervasive nature, have been of perennial interest to religious thinkers, philosophers, dramatists, and poets. In The Seven Deadly Sins, Solomon Schimmel explains why psychology must incorporate many of the ethical and spiritual values of (...)
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  32. Ofelia Schutte (1983). Envy and the Dark Side of Alienation. Human Studies 6 (1):225 - 238.
    It may be that the process of socialization is generally thought to depend upon the development of the slave consciousness. It appears that at present the type of indoctrination a child receives when he or she is socialized by parents and teachers is the general way in which a society makes sure it transmits its values from one generation to the next. If this is so, the analysis of the slave consciousness we have been pursuing would fundamentally call into question (...)
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  33. Marjo Siltaoja & Merja Lähdesmäki (forthcoming). From Rationality to Emotionally Embedded Relations: Envy as a Signal of Power in Stakeholder Relations. Journal of Business Ethics.
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  34. Maury Silver & John Sabini (1978). The Social Construction of Envy. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 8 (3):313–332.
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  35. Richard Smith (ed.) (2008). Envy, Theory and Research. Oxford University Press.
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  36. Richard Smith & Sung Hee Kim (2007). Comprehending Envy. Psychological Bulletin 133:46-64.
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  37. Richard Smith, Terence Turner, Ron Garonzick, Colin Leach, Vanessa Urch-Druskat & Christine Weston (1996). Envy and Schadenfreude. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin 22 (2):158-168.
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  38. H. W. Stubbs (1981). Envy and the Greeks: A Study of Human Behaviour. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 101:180.
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  39. Gabriele Taylor (2006). Deadly Vices. Oxford University Press.
    Gabriele Taylor presents a philosophical investigation of the "ordinary" vices traditionally seen as "death to the soul": sloth, envy, avarice, pride, anger, lust, and gluttony. In the course of a richly detailed discussion of individual and interrelated vices, which complements recent work by moral philosophers on virtue, she shows why these "deadly sins" are correctly so named and grouped together.
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  40. Gabriele Taylor (1988). Envy and Jealousy: Emotions and Vices. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 13 (1):233-249.
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  41. Peter Titelman (1981). A Phenomenological Comparison Between Envy and Jealousy. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 12 (2):189-204.
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  42. Patrick Tomlin (2008). Envy, Facts and Justice: A Critique of the Treatment of Envy in Justice as Fairness. Res Publica 14 (2):101-116.
    A common anti-egalitarian argument is that equality is motivated by envy, or the desire to placate envy. In order to avoid this charge, John Rawls explicitly banishes envy from his original position. This article argues that this is an inconsistent and untenable position for Rawls, as he treats envy as if it were a fact of human psychology and believes that principles of justice should be based on such facts. Therefore envy should be known about in the original position. The (...)
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  43. Gregory L. Ulmer (1977). The Legend of Herostratus: Existential Envy in Rousseau and Unamuno. University Presses of Florida.
  44. Stan Van Hooft (2002). La Caze on Envy and Resentment. Philosophical Explorations 5 (2):141 – 147.
    Marguerite La Caze has recently published a stimulating analysis of the emotions of envy and resentment in which she argues that to envy others for a benefit they have received or to resent them for such a reason can be ethically acceptable in cases where that benefit has been unjustly obtained (La Caze, 2001). I question this on the ground that the judgement that the benefit has been unjustly obtained plays a more complex role in the structure of envy and (...)
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  45. Robert Young (1987). Egalitarianism and Envy. Philosophical Studies 52 (2):261 - 276.
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  46. Rachel Zuckert (2003). Awe or Envy: Herder Contra Kant on the Sublime. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 61 (3):217–232.
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