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  1. Jose Ignacio Alcorta (1962). O Ser Como "Primum Cognitum" E a Priori Mental. Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 18 (3):266 - 277.
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  2. Eric H. Ash (2001). Queen V. Northumberland, and the Control of Technical Expertise. History of Science 39 (124):215-240.
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  3. Eoundationalism Strikes Back (2005). In Search of Epistemically Basic. In Rene van Woudenberg, Sabine Roeser & Ron Rood (eds.), Basic Belief and Basic Knowledge. Ontos-Verlag 41.
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  4. Earl of Balfour (1927). Familiar Beliefs and Transcendent Reason. Journal of Philosophical Studies 2 (7):395-396.
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  5. John A. Barker (1976). Audi on Epistemic Disavowals. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 57 (4):376.
  6. Anita Benisławska (2009). Intuition and Introspection Problems in Henryk Elzenberg's Philosophy. Dialogue and Universalism 19 (8-9):83-92.
    Intuition and introspection are very interesting terms in Elzenberg’s thought. The intuition is connected with the earlier phase of Elzenberg’s philosophy. Intuition is a form of world cognition. It is tool of selection of the contents. In Elzenberg’s philosophy introspection is a later term than intuition. It may lead intuition but is not a necessity. Process of cognition can finish with introspection which is a phase of information collection. In this meaning introspection creates circumstances for intuition. Introspection is a form (...)
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  7. Gustav Bergmann (1949). On Non-Perceptual Intuition. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 10 (2):263-264.
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  8. Christian Beyer & Alex Burri (eds.) (2007). Philosophical Knowledge: Its Possibility and Scope. Rodopi.
    The former "Queen of Science" seems to be lacking both a specific subject and a particular method. Thus the need arises for intra- and metaphilosophical orientation – especially since the way philosophy sees itself stems from various influential schools and traditions whose mutual exchange is not as lively as one might have hoped.
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  9. Alexander Bird (2004). Is Knowledge Non-Inferential? Philosophical Quarterly:252-65.
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  10. Marcel Bodea (2011). The Mix Of Languages. A Source Of Transdisciplinary Conflicts / Le Mélange Des Langages. Une Source Des Conflits Transdisciplinaires. Studia Philosophica 2.
    Epistemological criticism will be applied in those cases when the claims of certain constructs to represent a particular kind of knowledge are not legitimate. The communication of knowledge in society must be made in a correct way. We understand correctness as “justness and neutrality towards knowledge”. However, there may be political, ideological, religious, or other interests in promoting certain kind of knowledge, which weaken the foundations of a society based on knowledge. Certainly, The incompetence, the lack of culture, the existential (...)
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  11. Anthony Bryson & David Alexander (2012). The View From the Armchair: Responding to Kornblith's Alternative to Armchair Philosophy. Essays in Philosophy 13 (1):10.
    In the last two decades, the greatest threat to armchair philosophy has been the natural kinds approach. On this view, philosophic theorizing should not be obsessed with the ideas of justice, goodness, and truth but should look outward to the world of objects to find these things. And if these things happen to be natural kinds, like kinds of rock or fish for instance, then clearly we should reject the armchair for the lab. The philosopher should leave the office and (...)
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  12. T. Ryan Byerly & Kraig Martin (forthcoming). Problems for Explanationism on Both Sides. Erkenntnis:1-19.
    This paper continues a recent exchange in this journal concerning explanationist accounts of epistemic justification. In the first paper in this exchange, Byerly (2013a, b) argues that explanationist views judge that certain beliefs about the future are unjustified when in fact they are justified. In the second paper, McCain (2014b) defends a version of explanationism which he argues escapes Byerly’s criticism. Here we contribute to this exchange in two ways. In the first section, we argue that McCain’s defense of explanationism (...)
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  13. John Carriero (2013). Epistemology Past and Present. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 113 (2pt2):175-200.
    I draw attention to certain differences between how seventeenth-century philosophers thought about knowledge and how contemporary philosophers think about it. These differences do not strike me as particularly subtle; they are gross enough that we might wonder about the extent to which seventeenthth-century philosophers and modern philosophers are interested in the same thing. We might also wonder about the extent to which it is helpful to apply the same label—say, ‘epistemology’—to both sets of interests. I think, for example, one might (...)
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  14. Quassim Cassam (2009). The Possibility of Knowledge: Reply to Denis Bühler, Daniel Dohrn, David Lüthi, Bernhard Ritter and Simon Sauter. Abstracta 5 (4):100-113.
    How is knowledge of the external world possible? How is knowledge of other minds possible? How is a priori knowledge possible? These are all examples of how-possible questions in epistemology. In this highly original book Quassim Cassam explains how such questions arise and how they should be answered.
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  15. Amita Chatterjee (2003). Mohanty, J. N. Explorations in Philosophy: Indian Philosophy, Essays by J. N. Mohanty. Review of Metaphysics 57 (1):160-162.
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  16. Christopher George Cherniak (1977). Beliefs and Logical Abilities. Dissertation, University of California, Berkeley
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  17. Roderick M. Chisholm (1999). On the Nature of Acquaintance. In A. D. Irvine (ed.), Bertrand Russell: Critical Assessments. Routledge 211.
  18. L. Jonathan Cohen (1982). What is Necessary for Testimonial Corroboration? British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 33 (2):161-164.
  19. Thomus Cronlar (1997). Intuition as Authoritative Knowledge in Midwifery and Homebirth. In R. Davis-Floyd & P. Sven Arvidson (eds.), Intuition: The Inside Story. Routledge 145.
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  20. D. Davidson (1995). The Problem of Objectivity. Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 57 (2):203 - 220.
    Since Descartes, epistemology has been based on first person knowledge. We must begin, according to the usual story, with what is most certain: knowledge of our own sensations and thoughts. In one way or another we then progress, if we can, to knowledge of an objective external world. There is then the final, tenuous, step to knowledge of other minds. I shall argue for a total revision of this picture. All propositional thought, whether positive or skeptical, whether of the inner (...)
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  21. Donald Davidson (1991). Three Varieties of Knowledge. In A. Phillips Griffiths (ed.), Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement. New York: Cambridge University Press 153-166.
    I know, for the most part, what I think, want, and intend, and what my sensations are. In addition, I know a great deal about the world around me. I also sometimes know what goes on in other people's minds. Each of these three kinds of empirical knowledge has its distinctive characteristics. What I know about the contents of my own mind I generally know without investigation or appeal to evidence. There are exceptions, but the primacy of unmediated self-knowledge is (...)
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  22. Donald H. Deane, Kenneth R. Hammond & David A. Summers (1972). Acquisition and Application of Knowledge in Complex Inference Tasks. Journal of Experimental Psychology 92 (1):20.
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  23. Steve Deery (2012). New Essays on the a Priori, Eds. Paul Boghossian & Christopher Peacocke (Oxford University Press)£ 16.99/$24.95. The Philosophers' Magazine 16:57.
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  24. Daniel C. Dennett (1995). Overworking the Hippocampus. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):677-678.
    Gray mistakenly thinks I have rejected the sort of theoretical enterprise he is undertaking, because, according to him, I think that "more data" is all that is needed to resolve all the issues. Not at all. My stalking horse was the bizarre (often pathetic) claim that no amount of empirical, "third-person point-of-view" science (data plus theory) could ever reduce the residue of mystery about consciousness to zero. This "New Mysterianism" (Flanagan, 1991) is one that he should want to combat as (...)
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  25. Daniel Dohrn (2008). Epistemic Immediacy and Reflection. In Georg Brun, Ulvi Dogluoglu & Dominique Kuenzle (eds.), Epistemology and Emotions. Ashgate Publishing Company 105--24.
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  26. An Ecofeminist & Karen J. Warren (1997). Taking Empirical Data Seriously. In Karen Warren (ed.), Ecofeminism: Women, Culture, Nature. Indiana Univ Pr 3.
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  27. Martin Edman (1994). Innate Knowledge and Scientific Rationality. In Dag Prawitz & Dag Westerståhl (eds.), Logic and Philosophy of Science in Uppsala. Kluwer 99--115.
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  28. Ian Evans & Nicholas D. Smith (2013). Knowledge. Polity.
    Introductions to the theory of knowledge are plentiful, but none introduce students to the most recent debates that exercise contemporary philosophers. Ian Evans and Nicholas D. Smith aim to change that.
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  29. M. Fa'alli (unknown). Imagination And Judgment. Kheradnameh Sadra Quarterly 18.
    Discussions on the perception and knowledge are interspersed throughout the books written in Islamic sciences- whether philosophy or theology or logic or even the science of methodology . The problem of the knowledge has led to many other problems, which should be studied. These problems are as follows:1- A part of philosophy is the topic of categories , and among the high genera is the category of quality, which is divided into 4 general parts. The psychical qualities form a kind (...)
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  30. Dr M. Fathizadeh (unknown). Platonic Source of the Classical Theory of Knowledge. Kheradnameh Sadra Quarterly 21.
    In the modern philosophy the theory of knowledge has been among the main issues of philosophical researches, made by philosophers such as Descartes, Locke, Hume and Kant. That is why they have to be, primarily, regarded as the epistemologist. If we classify the theory of knowledge under three categories: the range of knowledge, the sources of knowledge, and the nature of knowledge, difference between epistemologists' ideas will become clearer. In particular, as regards the range of knowledge, there is a wide (...)
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  31. Surrendra Gangadean (2008). Philosophical Foundation: A Critical Analysis of Basic Beliefs. Upa.
    Philosophical Foundation argues for clarity over and against meaninglessness, which is implicit in various forms of skepticism and fideism. Throughout the book, critical analysis is applied to unexamined assumptions in the areas of metaphysics and ethics in order to address long-standing disputes.
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  32. Maryanne Garry, Lauren French & Loftus & Elizabeth (2009). False Memories: A Kind of Confabulation in Non-Clinical Subjects. In William Hirstein (ed.), Confabulation: Views From Neuroscience, Psychiatry, Psychology and Philosophy. OUP Oxford
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  33. Arthur N. Geddis, Barry Onslow, Carol Beynon & John Oesch (1993). Transforming Content Knowledge: Learning to Teach About Isotopes. Science Education 77 (6):575-591.
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  34. Alan H. Goldman (1992). Empirical Knowledge. Philosophical Review 101 (2):428-430.
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  35. Carmen Carretero Gómez (2000). " Epistemology: A Contemporary Introduction to the Theory of Knowledge", de Robert Audi. Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 19 (1):132-137.
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  36. A. D. H. (1973). Facts, Words and Beliefs. Review of Metaphysics 27 (2):413-414.
  37. Gilbert Harman (1968). Knowledge, Inference, and Explanation. American Philosophical Quarterly 5 (3):164 - 173.
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  38. S. Hetherington (1999). Lawrence BonJour, In Defense of Pure Reason. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 77 (1):111-112.
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  39. Alison Hills, Christopher Mcmahon & Once More Friends (2003). Knowledge and Psychological Explanation 37–52 Sanford C. Goldberg/Anti-Individualism, Conceptual Omniscience, and Skepticism 53–78 Steven Wall/Just Savings and the Difference Principle 79–102. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 116:325-326.
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  40. Frank Hofmann (2014). Non‐Conceptual Knowledge. Philosophical Issues 24 (1):184-208.
    The paper is an investigation into the prospects of an epistemology of non-conceptual knowledge. According to the orthodox view, knowledge requires concepts and belief. I present several arguments to the effect that there is non-conceptual, non-doxastic knowledge, the obvious candidate for such knowledge being non-conceptual perception. Non-conceptual perception seems to be allowed for by cognitive scientists and it exhibits the central role features of knowledge—it plays the knowledge role: it respects an anti-luck condition, it is an achievement, it enables one (...)
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  41. Frank Jackson (2000). Representation, Scepticism, and the A Priori. In Paul Boghossian & Christopher Peacocke (eds.), New Essays on the a Priori. Oxford University Press 320--332.
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  42. James William Jobes (1967). On Revealing: An Examination of Some Questions Concerning Art as a Source of Knowledge. Dissertation, University of Virginia
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  43. Kevin Kimble (2013). BonJour's Defense of Induction: An A Priorist Way Out? Dialogue 52 (3):449-476.
    Laurence BonJour has proposed a novel defense of the inductive principle in response to a skeptical challenge posed by Hume. In this paper, I elaborate and criticize BonJour’s strategy. Along the way, I draw attention to Anthony Brueckner’s criticisms of BonJour’s approach, detailing why they fall short of providing an effective rebuttal of BonJour’s argument. By distinguishing and applying two different kinds of probability assessment to BonJour’s premises, I argue that BonJour’s a priori strategy fails to provide a cogent defense (...)
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  44. Søren Harnow Klausen (2006). Access to the Abstract: Intuition as Mental Modelling. SATS: Northern European Journal of Philosophy 7 (2):86-105.
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  45. Andrew Craig Koehl (1998). Implicitly Grounded Beliefs. Dissertation, University of Notre Dame
    Implicitly grounded seemings are impulses to believe which arise from thought processes of which the subject is not conscious, and implicitly grounded beliefs are beliefs that are grounded in such seemings. Many epistemologists would say that argumentative support is not needed in order for basic perceptual, memory, introspective, or a priori beliefs to count as warranted. One can know directly, based merely in its seeming so, that it is sunny outside, that one had eggs for breakfast, that one has a (...)
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  46. Robert Levy (1999). Lawrence BonJour's in Defense of Pure Reason. Southwest Philosophy Review 15 (2):123-126.
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  47. Guy Longworth (2013). Epistemic Authority. Analysis 74 (1):ant115.
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  48. Robert W. Lurz (1998). Animal Minds: The Possibility of Second-Order Beliefs in Non-Linguistic Animals. Dissertation, Temple University
    I defend the thesis that it is conceptually possible for non-linguistic creatures to possess second-order beliefs--that is, beliefs about their own beliefs and those of others. I defend this thesis against Donald Davidson and Jonathan Bennett who argue that the thesis is false on the grounds that non-linguistic creatures cannot manifest second-order beliefs. In reply, I present a case that I argue shows a non-linguistic creature manifesting second-order beliefs. Also, I examine and criticize two arguments of Davidson's that are designed (...)
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  49. Jack Coady Lyons (1999). Epistemological Consequences of a Faculty Psychology. Dissertation, The University of Arizona
    Traditional epistemology has devoted much attention to the distinctions between perception and inference and between basic and non-basic beliefs. Hot, I develop a different and more general distinction, between what I call "privileged" and "nonprivileged" beliefs; privileged beliefs are justifiable by means of an otherwise substandard argument while nonprivileged beliefs require support by a generally adequate argument for their justification I argue that even coherentists are tacitly committed to this distinction and that one of the chief problems for simple reliabilist (...)
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  50. Penelope Maddy (2000). Naturalism and the A Priori. In Paul Boghossian & Christopher Peacocke (eds.), Philosophical Studies. Oxford University Press 92--116.
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