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  1. W. Albury (2011). A Non-Epistemological History of Historical Epistemology. Metascience 20 (3):481-482.
    A non-epistemological history of historical epistemology Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11016-010-9501-5 Authors W. R. Albury, School of Humanities, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
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  2. Guy Bennett-Hunter (2012). A Pragmatist Conception of Certainty: Wittgenstein and Santayana. European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy 4 (2):146-157.
  3. Paul Richard Blum, Epistemology and Cosmology in Neoplatonism: Is Cognition a Mind-Body-Problem? Paper at Cosmos, Nature, Culture - A Transdisciplinary Conference Metanexus Conference July 18-21, 2009, Phoenix, Arizona. [REVIEW] http://www.metanexus.net/conference2009/articles/Default.aspx?id=10790.
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  4. Anthony Brueckner & Christopher T. Buford (2009). Thinking Animals and Epistemology. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 90 (3):310-314.
    We consider one of Eric Olson's chief arguments for animalism about personal identity: the view that we are each identical to a human animal. The argument was originally given in Olson's book The Human Animal . Olson's argument presupposes an epistemological premise which we examine in detail. We argue that the premise is implausible and that Olson's defense of animalism is therefore in trouble.
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  5. Heather Douglas (2004). The Irreducible Complexity of Objectivity. Synthese 138 (3):453 - 473.
    The terms ``objectivity'''' and ``objective'''' are among the mostused yet ill-defined terms in the philosophy of science and epistemology. Common to all thevarious usages is the rhetorical force of ``I endorse this and you should too'''', orto put it more mildly, that one should trust the outcome of the objectivity-producing process.The persuasive endorsement and call to trust provide some conceptual coherenceto objectivity, but the reference to objectivity is hopefully not merely an attemptat persuasive endorsement. What, in addition to epistemological endorsement,does (...)
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  6. Haskell Fain & E. F. Kaelin (1960). Student Philosophical Opinions: A Survey. Inquiry 3 (1-4):137 – 152.
    Opinion surveys were taken in an effort to determine the philosophical beliefs of students beginning philosophy. Correlated sets were made of those who took the survey before and after a first course in philosophy; and opinion shifts noted. The acquired information may be of interest to people in various disciplines. The authors tested the semantic usage of certain epistemological terms, the change in religious beliefs, the degree of consistency between general skepticism and particular knowledge claims. Finally, the authors proposed a (...)
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  7. Jane Friedman (2013). Rational Agnosticism and Degrees of Belief. Oxford Studies in Epistemology 4:57.
    There has been much discussion about whether traditional epistemology's doxastic attitudes are reducible to degrees of belief. In this paper I argue that what I call the Straightforward Reduction - the reduction of all three of believing p, disbelieving p, and suspending judgment about p, not-p to precise degrees of belief for p and not-p that ought to obey the standard axioms of the probability calculus - cannot succeed. By focusing on suspension of judgment (agnosticism) rather than belief, we can (...)
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  8. Sander L. Gilman (1999). By a Nose: On the Construction of 'Foreign Bodies'. Social Epistemology 13 (1):49 – 58.
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  9. Brian C. Goodwin (2009). Genetic Epistemology and Constructionist Biology. Biological Theory 4 (2):115-124.
  10. Elizabeth Gould (2005). Nomadic Turns: Epistemology, Experience, and Women University Band Directors. Philosophy of Music Education Review 13 (2):147-164.
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  11. Lisa‘John Dewey Heldke & Evelyn Fox Keller (1989). A Shared Epistemological Tradition'. Hypatia 2 (3):129-40.
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  12. Nicholas Maxwell (2007). From Knowledge to Wisdom: A Revolution for Science and the Humanities (Second Edition). Pentire Press.
    From Knowledge to Wisdom argues that there is an urgent need, for both intellectual and humanitarian reasons, to bring about a revolution in science and the humanities. The outcome would be a kind of academic inquiry rationally devoted to helping humanity learn how to create a better world. Instead of giving priority to solving problems of knowledge, as at present, academia would devote itself to helping us solve our immense, current global problems – climate change, war, poverty, population growth, pollution (...)
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  13. MichaelBishop & J. D. Trout (2005). The Pathologies of Standard Analytic Epistemology. Noûs 39 (4):696–714.
  14. Daniele Moyal-Sharrock (ed.) (2004). The Third Wittgenstein: The Post-Investigations Works. Ashgate.
    This book also provides new and illuminating accounts of difficult concepts, such as patterns of life, experiencing meaning, meaning blindness, lying and ...
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  15. Brent Mundy (1989). Book Review:Methodology, Epistemology, and Philosophy: Essays in Honour of Wolfgang Stegmuller on the Occasion of His 60th Birthday Carl G. Hempel, Hilary Putnam, Wilhelm K. Essler. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 56 (2):361-.
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  16. John W. Murphy (1988). Computerization, Postmodern Epistemology, and Reading in the Postmodern Era. Educational Theory 38 (2):175-182.
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  17. Ernest Nagel (1965). Meaning and Knowledge: Systematic Readings in Epistemology. New York, Harcourt, Brace & World.
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  18. Deron S. Newman (2002). M. L. McPherran (Ed.): Recognition, Remembrance and Reality. New Essays on Plato's Epistemology and Metaphysics . Pp. Ix + 157. Kelowna: Academic Printing and Publishing, 2000. Paper, $24.95. ISBN: 0-920980-75-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 52 (01):172-.
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  19. Yang Nianqun (2000). Defining the "Epistemology" Question. Contemporary Chinese Thought 31 (3):5-16.
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  20. Ryan Nichols (2001). Thomas Reid and the Story of Epistemology. Hume Studies 27 (2):349-352.
  21. Thomas Nickles (2009). Life at the Frontier: The Relevance of Heuristic Appraisal to Policy. [REVIEW] Axiomathes 19 (4):441-464.
    Economic competitive advantage depends on innovation, which in turn requires pushing back the frontiers of various kinds of knowledge. Although understanding how knowledge grows ought to be a central topic of epistemology, epistemologists and philosophers of science have given it insufficient attention, even deliberately shunning the topic. Traditional confirmation theory and general epistemology offer little help at the frontier, because they are mostly retrospective rather than prospective. Nor have philosophers been highly visible in the science and technology policy realm, despite (...)
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  22. Julian Nida-Rümelin (ed.) (1999). Rationality, Realism and Revision.
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  23. L. Noël (1927). The Neo-Scholastic Approach to the Problems of Epistemology. New Scholasticism 1 (2):136-146.
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  24. Bryan G. Norton (2007). Politics and Epistemology: Inclusion and Controversy in Adaptive Management Processes. Environmental Ethics 29 (3):299-306.
    Kevin Elliott has argued that I defend two “conceptions” of adaptive management processes in my book, Sustainability: A Philosophy of Adaptive Ecosystem Management, calling the conceptions “political” and “metaphysical,” respectively. Elliott claims that I must choose between them. Elliott has not sufficiently explained how he proceeds from the claim that I provide two separable arguments for my adaptive management process to his conclusion that I have two conceptions of this process. Once this confusion is clarified, it becomes clear that adapting (...)
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  25. Bryan G. Norton (1992). Epistemology and Environmental Values. The Monist 75 (2):208-226.
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  26. Per Nortvedt (2003). Immersed Subjectivity and Engaged Narratives: Clinical Epistemology and Normative Intricacy. Nursing Philosophy 4 (2):129-136.
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  27. Susana & Gary Nuccetelli & Seay (ed.) (2007). Themes From G. E. Moore: New Essays in Epistemology and Ethics. Oxford University Press.
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  28. Nuccetelli & Seay (eds.) (2007). Themes From G. E. Moore: New Essays in Epistemology. Oxford University Press.
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  29. Brian O'Connor (1994). Adorno's Dialectical Epistemology. Idealistic Studies 24 (1):61-76.
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  30. Omedi Ochieng (2008). The Epistemology of African Philosophy. International Philosophical Quarterly 48 (3):337-359.
    This essay critiques the ontology and epistemology of African philosophy, with particular attention to Odera Oruka’s sage philosophy project, one of the most influential schools of thought in African philosophy. Oruka posits an absolutist ontology that holds to a conception of epistemology as presuppositionless and transcendental. Against this, I argue for a critical contextual epistemology that proffers a view of epistemology as embodied, linguistically performed, social, ideological, rhetorical, and contextual. I argue, ultimately, that a critical contextual epistemology is not only (...)
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  31. Erik Nis Ostenfeld (2003). Socratic Epistemology H. H. Benson: Socratic Wisdom. The Model of Knowledge in Plato's Early Dialogues . New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000. Pp. IX + 292. Cased, £40.00. Isbn: 0-19-512918-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 53 (01):44-.
  32. Christopher Peacocke (2009). Means and Explanation in Epistemology. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 59 (237):730-737.
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  33. Franck Varenne (2010). Les simulations computationnelles dans les sciences sociales. Nouvelles Perspectives En Sciences Sociales 5 (2):17-49.
    Since the 1990’s, social sciences are living their computational turn. This paper aims to clarify the epistemological meaning of this turn. To do this, we have to discriminate between different epistemic functions of computation among the diverse uses of computers for modeling and simulating in the social sciences. Because of the introduction of a new – and often more user-friendly – way of formalizing and computing, the question of realism of formalisms and of proof value of computational treatments reemerges. Facing (...)
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  34. Franck Varenne (2001). What Does a Computer Simulation Prove? The Case of Plant Modeling at CIRAD. In N. Giambiasi & C. Frydman (eds.), Simulation in industry - ESS 2001, Proc. of the 13th European Simulation Symposium. Society for Computer Simulation (SCS).
    The credibility of digital computer simulations has always been a problem. Today, through the debate on verification and validation, it has become a key issue. I will review the existing theses on that question. I will show that, due to the role of epistemological beliefs in science, no general agreement can be found on this matter. Hence, the complexity of the construction of sciences must be acknowledged. I illustrate these claims with a recent historical example. Finally I temperate this diversity (...)
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Epistemic Injustice
  1. Elizabeth Anderson (2012). Epistemic Justice as a Virtue of Social Institutions. Social Epistemology 26 (2):163-173.
    In Epistemic injustice, Miranda Fricker makes a tremendous contribution to theorizing the intersection of social epistemology with theories of justice. Theories of justice often take as their object of assessment either interpersonal transactions (specific exchanges between persons) or particular institutions. They may also take a more comprehensive perspective in assessing systems of institutions. This systemic perspective may enable control of the cumulative effects of millions of individual transactions that cannot be controlled at the individual or institutional levels. This is true (...)
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  2. Laura Beeby (2011). A Critique of Hermeneutical Injustice. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 111 (3pt3):479-486.
    Recent work at the junction of epistemology and political theory focuses on the notion of epistemic injustice, the injustice of being wronged as a knower. Miranda Fricker (2007) identifies two kinds of epistemic injustice. I focus here on hermeneutical injustice in an attempt to identify a difficulty for Fricker's account. In particular, I consider the significance of background social conditions and suggest that an epistemic injustice should not rely on other forms of disadvantage to achieve its status as an injustice. (...)
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  3. Annaleigh Curtis (2013). Review of The Epistemology of Resistance: Gender and Racial Oppression, Epistemic Injustice, and Resistant Imaginations. [REVIEW] Hypatia.
  4. Miranda Fricker (2013). Epistemic Justice as a Condition of Political Freedom? Synthese 190 (7):1317-1332.
    I shall first briefly revisit the broad idea of ‘epistemic injustice’, explaining how it can take either distributive or discriminatory form, in order to put the concepts of ‘testimonial injustice’ and ‘hermeneutical injustice’ in place. In previous work I have explored how the wrong of both kinds of epistemic injustice has both an ethical and an epistemic significance—someone is wronged in their capacity as a knower. But my present aim is to show that this wrong can also have a political (...)
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  5. Miranda Fricker (2010). Replies to Alcoff, Goldberg, and Hookway on Epistemic Injustice. Episteme 7 (2):164-178.
    In this paper I respond to three commentaries on Epistemic Injustice: Power and the Ethics of Knowing. In response to Alcoff, I primarily defend my conception of how an individual hearer might develop virtues of epistemic justice. I do this partly by drawing on empirical social psychological evidence supporting the possibility of reflective self-regulation for prejudice in our judgements. I also emphasize the fact that individual virtue is only part of the solution – structural mechanisms also have an essential role (...)
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  6. Miranda Fricker (2008). On Miranda Fricker's Epistemic Injustice: Power and the Ethics of Knowing. Theoria 23 (1):69-71.
    This paper summarizes key themes from my Epistemic Injustice: Power and the Ethics of Knowing (OUP, 2007); and it gives replies to commentators.
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  7. Miranda Fricker (2008). Replies to Critics. Theoria 23 (1):81-86.
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  8. Miranda Fricker (2007). Epistemic Injustice: Power and the Ethics of Knowing. Oxford University Press.
    Fricker shows that virtue epistemology provides a general epistemological idiom in which these issues can be forcefully discussed.
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  9. Miranda Fricker (2006). Powerlessness and Social Interpretation. Episteme 3 (1-2):96-108.
    Our understanding of social experiences is central to our social understanding more generally. But this sphere of epistemic practice can be structurally prejudiced by unequal relations of power, so that some groups suff er a distinctive kind of epistemic injustice—hermeneutical injustice. I aim to achieve a clear conception of this epistemicethical phenomenon, so that we have a workable definition and a proper understanding of the wrong that it inflicts.
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  10. Miranda Fricker (2003). Epistemic Injustice and a Role for Virtue in the Politics of Knowing. Metaphilosophy 34 (1/2):154-173.
    The dual aim of this article is to reveal and explain a certain phenomenon of epistemic injustice as manifested in testimonial practice, and to arrive at a characterisation of the anti–prejudicial intellectual virtue that is such as to counteract it. This sort of injustice occurs when prejudice on the part of the hearer leads to the speaker receiving less credibility than he or she deserves. It is suggested that where this phenomenon is systematic it constitutes an important form of oppression. (...)
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  11. Miranda Fricker (1999). Epistemic Oppression and Epistemic Privilege. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 29 (Supplement):191-210.
    (1999). Epistemic Oppression and Epistemic Privilege. Canadian Journal of Philosophy: Vol. 29, Supplementary Volume 25: Civilization and Oppression, pp. 191-210.
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  12. Sanford Goldberg (2010). Comments on Miranda Fricker's Epistemic Injustice. Episteme 7 (2):138-150.
    Miranda Fricker's Epistemic Injustice is a wide-ranging and important book on a much-neglected topic: the injustice involved in cases in which distrust arises out of prejudice. Fricker has some important things to say about this sort of injustice: its nature, how it arises, what sustains it, and the unhappy outcomes associated with it for the victim and the society in which it takes place. In the course of developing this account, Fricker also develops an account of the epistemology of testimony. (...)
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  13. Polycarp Ikuenobe (1998). A Defense of Epistemic Authoritarianism in Traditional African Cultures. Journal of Philosophical Research 23:417-440.
    In this paper, I take issue with Wiredu’s characterization and criticism of the general problem of epistemic authoritarianism that he identifies in some African cultures. I then defend a plausible view of epistemic authoritarianism as a method of epistemic justification in some African cultures. I argue that both his characterization and criticism implies an affirmation of epistemic individualism and autonomy, doxastic voluntarism, and a denial of epistemic dependence. I argue against epistemic autonomy and individualism, and doxastic voluntarism, because they imply (...)
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  14. Karen Jones (2012). The Politics of Intellectual Self-Trust. Social Epistemology 26 (2):237-251.
    Just as testimony is affected by unjust social relations, so too is intellectual self-trust. I defend an account of intellectual self-trust that explains both why it is properly thought of as trust and why it is directed at the self, and explore its relationship to social power. Intellectual self-trust is neither a matter of having dispositions to rely on one?s epistemic methods and mechanisms, nor having a set of beliefs about which ones are reliable. Instead, it is a stance that (...)
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  15. Marianne Winther Jørgensen (2011). The Terms of Debate: The Negotiation of the Legitimacy of a Marginalised Perspective. Social Epistemology 24 (4):313-330.
    A growing body of knowledge within the social sciences is produced from the perspectives of marginalised groups of people, and often, western science is criticised as an accomplice in a male-dominated and/or Eurocentric hegemony where alternative voices are excluded. This article investigates the terms of debate of this kind of knowledge in the social scientific community: who can partake in this discussion, and with which kind of commitment? The empirical material is the reviews of Linda Tuhiwai Smith?s book Decolonizing methodologies. (...)
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  16. Catharina Landstroem (1994). The Boundaries of Housework. Social Epistemology 8 (2):133 – 138.
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