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  1. Alexander Agnello (2014). A Review of "Disability & Justice: The Capabilities Approach in Practice", by Christopher A. Riddle. [REVIEW] Dialogue 7:1-3.
  2. John M. Alexander (2010). Ending the Liberal Hegemony: Republican Freedom and Amartya Sen's Theory of Capabilities. Contemporary Political Theory 9 (1):5-24.
    While being generally appreciative of Sen's theory of capabilities, the point of this paper is to raise some conceptual challenges that arise in addressing entrenched conditions of power and domination from the capability paradigm. The enhancement of people's capability prospects with regard to education, employment, decent living standards and political participation can empower them to challenge various dominating conditions in society. It can also bestow a sense of self-confidence in people to stand up against discriminating practices. Yet, the objectives of (...)
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  3. John M. Alexander (2003). Capability Egalitarianism and Moral Selfhood. Ethical Perspectives 10 (1):3-21.
    Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum advocate that a person’s quality of life and equal standing in society should be evaluated in terms of capabilities rather than utility, income or resources.In this article, I critically examine the concept of the person that underpins the capability approach. I argue that the ideal of equality of capability articulates a ‘non-utilitarian’ and ‘non-liberal’ view of the self.
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  4. John B. Davis and, The Capabilities Conception of the Individual.
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  5. Carlo Argenton & Enzo Rossi (2013). Pluralism, Preferences, and Deliberation: A Critique of Sen's Constructive Argument for Democracy. Journal of Social Philosophy 44 (2):129-145.
    In this paper we argue that Sen's defence of liberal democracy suffers from a moralistic and pro-liberal bias that renders it unable to take pluralism as seriously as it professes to do. That is because Sen’s commitment to respecting pluralism is not matched by his account of how to individuate the sorts of preferences that ought to be included in democratic deliberation. Our argument generalises as a critique of the two most common responses to the fact of pluralism in contemporary (...)
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  6. Richard Arneson (2008). Egalitarianism. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  7. Richard J. Arneson (2013). From Primary Goods to Capabilities to Well-Being. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 16 (2):179-195.
    Amartya Sen?s The Idea of Justice (2009) mistakenly characterizes transcendental accounts of justice as being unable to compare non-ideal alternatives, and thus misfires as a criticism of Robert Nozick and John Rawls. In fact, Nozick?s disinterest in when rights may be overridden does not bespeak indifference to specific questions of comparative assessment, and Lockean rights do give determinate advice in everyday circumstances. Sen correctly reports that Rawls?s theory is defective at giving practical normative advice, but the basic problem is the (...)
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  8. Linda Barclay (2012). Natural Deficiency or Social Oppression? The Capabilities Approach to Justice for People with Disabilities. Journal of Moral Philosophy 9 (4):500-520.
    Theories of distributive justice are often criticised for either excluding people with disabilities from the domain of justice altogether, or casting them as deficient in personal attributes. I argue that the capabilities approach to justice is largely immune to these flaws. It has the conceptual resources to locate most of the causes of disadvantage in the interaction between a person and her environment and in doing so can characterise the disadvantages of disability in a way that avoids the imputation of (...)
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  9. Ron Beadle & Martyn Dyer-Smith (2001). On Human Capability. Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 3 (1):1 - 27.
    Ron Beadle and Martyn Dyer-Smith discuss the understanding of human capability posited by two elitist thinkers: Elliott Jaques and Ayn Rand. They review Rand's ideas in this area, present Jaques's contributions in his own field, and compare their approaches. They find that both view individuals' abilities to plan over time as a key discriminator.
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  10. Sandrine Berges (2011). Why Women Hug Their Chains: Wollstonecraft and Adaptive Preferences. Utilitas (1):72-87.
    In a recent article, Amartya Sen writes that one important influence on his theory of adaptive preferences is Wollstonecraft's account of how some women, though clearly oppressed, are apparently satisfied with their lot. Wollstonecraft's arguments have received little attention so far from contemporary political philosophers, and one might be tempted to dismiss Sen's acknowledgment as a form of gallantry. That would be wrong. Wollstonecraft does have a lot of interest to say on the topic of why her contemporaries appeared to (...)
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  11. Sandrine Berges (2007). Why the Capability Approach is Justified. Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (1):16–25.
    Sen and Nussbaum's capability approach has in the past twenty years become an increasingly popular and influential approach to issues in global justice. Its main tenet is that when assessing quality of life or asking what kind of policies will be more conducive to human development, we should look not to resources or preference satisfaction, but to what people are able to be and to do. This should then be measured against a more or less narrow conception of what any (...)
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  12. Alexandre L. Bertin & Nicolas Sirven (2006). 14 Social Capital and the Capability Approach. In Betsy Jane Clary, Wilfred Dolfsma & Deborah M. Figart (eds.), Ethics and the Market: Insights From Social Economics. Routledge 191.
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  13. M. J. Boxer (2002). Women and Human Development: The Capabilities Approach. By Martha Nussbaum. The European Legacy 7 (4):507-507.
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  14. Thom Brooks, The Capabilities Approach, Religious Practices, and the Importance of Recognition.
    When can ever be justified in banning a religious practice? This paper focusses on Martha Nussbaum's capabilities approach. Certain religious practices create a clash between capabilities where the capability to religious belief and expression is in conflict with the capability of equal status and nondiscrimination. One example of such a clash is the case of polygamy. Nussbaum argues that there may be circumstances where polygamy may be acceptable. On the contrary, I argue that the capabilities approach cannot justify polygamy in (...)
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  15. Thom Brooks (2011). A New Approach. The Philosophers' Magazine 54 (54):110-111.
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  16. Thom Brooks (2011). Respect for Nature: The Capabilities Approach. Ethics, Policy and Environment 14 (2):143 - 146.
    Ethics, Policy & Environment, Volume 14, Issue 2, Page 143-146, June 2011.
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  17. Thom Brooks & Martha C. Nussbaum (eds.) (2015). Rawls's Political Liberalism. Cup.
    Widely hailed as one of the most significant works in modern political philosophy, John Rawls's _Political Liberalism_ defended a powerful vision of society that respects reasonable ways of life, both religious and secular. These core values have never been more critical as anxiety grows over political and religious difference and new restrictions are placed on peaceful protest and individual expression. This anthology of original essays suggests new, groundbreaking applications of Rawls's work in multiple disciplines and contexts. Thom Brooks, Martha Nussbaum, (...)
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  18. Kirsten Brukamp (2001). Elements of Eudaimonia: Capabilities and Functionings. In Angela Kallhoff (ed.), Martha C. Nussbaum: Ethics and Political Philosophy: Lecture and Colloquium in Münster 2000. Distributed in North America by Transaction Publishers 4--93.
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  19. Francesco Burchi, Pasquale De Muro & Eszter Kollar (2014). Which Dimensions Should Matter for Capabilities? A Constitutional Approach. Ethics and Social Welfare 8 (3):233-247.
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  20. Simon Caney (2015). Coercion, Justification, and Inequality: Defending Global Egalitarianism. Ethics and International Affairs 29 (3):277-288.
    Michael Blake’s excellent book 'Justice and Foreign Policy' makes an important contribution to the ongoing debates about the kinds of values that should inform the foreign policy of liberal states. In this paper I evaluate his defence of the view that egalitarianism applies within the state but not globally. I discuss two arguments he gives for this claim - one appealing to the material preconditions of democracy and the other grounded in a duty to justify coercive power. I argue that (...)
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  21. Simon Caney (2009). Justice and the Distribution of Greenhouse Gas Emissions. Journal of Global Ethics 5 (2):125-146.
    The prospect of dangerous climate change requires Humanity to limit the emission of greenhouse gases. This in turn raises the question of how the permission to emit greenhouse gases should be distributed and among whom. In this article the author criticises three principles of distributive justice that have often been advanced in this context. He also argues that the predominantly statist way in which the question is framed occludes some morally relevant considerations. The latter part of the article turns from (...)
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  22. Rutger J. G. Claassen (2009). Institutional Pluralism and the Limits of the Market. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 8 (4):420-447.
    This paper proposes a theory of institutional pluralism to deal with the question whether and to what extent limits should be placed on the market. It reconceives the pluralist position as it was presented by Michael Walzer and others in several respects. First, it argues that the options on the institutional menu should not be principles of distribution but rather economic mechanisms or ‘modes of provision’. This marks a shift from a distributive to a provisional logic. Second, it argues that (...)
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  23. Rutger Claassen & Marcus Düwell (2013). The Foundations of Capability Theory: Comparing Nussbaum and Gewirth. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (3):493-510.
    This paper is written from a perspective that is sympathetic to the basic idea of the capability approach. Our aim is to compare Martha Nussbaum’s capability theory of justice with Alan Gewirth’s moral theory, on two points: the selection and the justification of a list of central capabilities. On both counts, we contend that Nussbaum’s theory suffers from flaws that Gewirth’s theory may help to remedy. First, we argue that her notion of a (dignified) human life cannot fulfill the role (...)
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  24. Elena Colombetti (2011). Creating Capabilities. The Human Development Approach. [REVIEW] Philosophical News 3.
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  25. Flavio Comim & Miriam Teschl (2006). Introduction: Capabilities and Identity. Journal of Economic Methodology 13 (3):293-298.
  26. Jesús Conill (2013). The Philosophical Foundations of the Capabilities Approach. In Christopher Luetege (ed.), Handbook of the Philosophical Foundations of Business Ethics. Springer 661--674.
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  27. Diana Coole (2010). Ending the Liberal Hegemony: Republican Freedom and Amartya Sen's Theory of Capabilities. Contemporary Political Theory 9 (1):5-24.
    While being generally appreciative of Sen's theory of capabilities, the point of this paper is to raise some conceptual challenges that arise in addressing entrenched conditions of power and domination from the capability paradigm. The enhancement of people's capability prospects with regard to education, employment, decent living standards and political participation can empower them to challenge various dominating conditions in society. It can also bestow a sense of self-confidence in people to stand up against discriminating practices. Yet, the objectives of (...)
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  28. Nelarine Cornelius & Nigel Laurie (2003). Capable Management. Philosophy of Management 3 (1):3-16.
    Martha Nussbaum is one of the most prolific and distinguished philosophers in the English-speaking world. Since 1995 she has been Ernst Freund Distinguished Service Professor of Law and Ethics at the University of Chicago appointed in the Law School, Philosophy Department and Divinity School. She is an Associate in the Classics Department and the Political Science Department, an Affiliate of the Committee on Southern Asian Studies, a Board Member of the Human Rights Program and founder and Coordinator of a new (...)
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  29. Julie Custeau (2002). Martha C. Nussbaum, Women and Human Development: The Capabilities Approach Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 22 (5):349-351.
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  30. John Danaher (forthcoming). Will Life Be Worth Living in a World Without Work? Technological Unemployment and the Meaning of Life. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-24.
    Suppose we are about to enter an era of increasing technological unemployment. What implications does this have for society? Two distinct ethical/social issues would seem to arise. The first is one of distributive justice: how will the (presumed) efficiency gains from automated labour be distributed through society? The second is one of personal fulfillment and meaning: if people no longer have to work, what will they do with their lives? In this article, I set aside the first issue and focus (...)
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  31. Iris Domselaar (2009). Nussbaum's Capabilities Approach: In Need of a Moral Epistemology? Netherlands Journal of Legal Philosophy 3:186-201.
    Although Nussbaum’s “Capabilities Approach” clearly expresses a commitment to objectivity, this article argues that this commitment is rather ambiguous due to the conception of public reason it endorses. In particular, the CA cannot account for an objective justification of public reason, given certain characteristics of public reason. As a result, the CA jeopardizes the substantive aim it has set itself: to provide an objective justification for public choices regarding human capabilities and their specifications.
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  32. Dale Dorsey (2008). Toward a Theory of the Basic Minimum. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 7 (4):423-445.
    Many have thought that an important feature of any just society is the establishment and maintenance of a suitable basic minimum: some set of welfare achievements, resources, capabilities, and so on that are guaranteed to all. However, if a basic minimum is a plausible requirement of justice, we must have a theory — a theory of what, precisely, the state owes in terms of these basic needs or achievements and what, precisely, is the proper structure of the obligation to provide (...)
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  33. Jay Drydyk (2012). A Capability Approach to Justice as a Virtue. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (1):23-38.
    In The Idea of Justice , Amartya Sen argues for an approach to justice that is comparative and realization-based rather than transcendental and institutional. While Sen’s arguments for such an approach may not be as convincing as he thought, there are additional arguments for it, and one is that it provides a unique and valuable platform on which an account of justice as a virtue of social and political actors (including institutions and social movements) can be built. Hence new dimensions (...)
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  34. Georges Enderle (2013). The Capability Approach as Guidance for Corporate Ethics. In Christopher Luetege (ed.), Handbook of the Philosophical Foundations of Business Ethics. Springer 675--691.
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  35. Ryan Thurber Fischbeck (2014). On Henry Sidgwick's “Luxury”. Ethics 125 (1):226-228,.
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  36. James E. Foster & Christopher Handy (2008). External Capabilities. In Kaushik Basu & Ravi Kanbur (eds.), Arguments for a Better World: Essays in Honor of Amartya Sen: Volume I: Ethics, Welfare, and Measurement and Volume Ii: Society, Institutions, and Development. OUP Oxford
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  37. Benjamin Franks (2008). Power, Capability and Ableness: The Fallacy of the Vehicle Fallacy. Contemporary Political Theory 7 (3):238-258.
    Sen's capabilities are reducible to individual power. Morriss's important distinction between ability and ableness is pertinent to the correct analysis of measuring capabilities. Morriss argues reducing power to resources constitutes the vehicle fallacy. The vehicle fallacy is not a fallacy if resources are measured relationally, for example, the power of money is relative to its distribution. It follows that strategic considerations must enter into the very essence of the concept of power. While ‘resources’ in this essay are broader than Dworkin's (...)
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  38. Katy Fulfer (2013). The Capabilities Approach to Justice and the Flourishing of Nonsentient Life. Ethics and the Environment 18 (1):19-38.
    According to Martha Nussbaum’s capabilities approach (CA) to justice, a (liberal) society is just if it provides people with the means to actualize basic capabilities that are necessary for a dignified human life. In Frontiers of Justice, Nussbaum (2006) expands the CA to include sentient nonhuman animals in the sphere of justice (as opposed, for instance, to the sphere of compassion). As it does for humans, justice requires that sentient creatures have the ability to access capabilities necessary for their flourishing, (...)
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  39. Michael Garnett (2007). Ignorance, Incompetence and the Concept of Liberty. Journal of Political Philosophy 15 (4):428–446.
    What is liberty, and can it be measured? In this paper I argue that the only way to have a liberty metric is to adopt an account of liberty with specific and controversial features. In particular, I argue that we can make sense of the idea of a quantity of liberty only if we are willing to count certain purely agential constraints, such as ignorance and physical incompetence, as obstacles to liberty in general. This spells trouble for traditional ‘negative’ accounts, (...)
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  40. Katharine Gelber (2010). Freedom of Political Speech, Hate Speech and the Argument From Democracy: The Transformative Contribution of Capabilities Theory. Contemporary Political Theory 9 (3):304-324.
    Much of the most influential free speech scholarship emphasises that ‘political speech’ warrants the very highest standards of protection because of its centrality to self-governance. This central idea mitigates against efforts to justify the regulation of political speech and renders some egregiously offensive or harmful speech worthy of protection from a theoretical perspective. Yet paradoxically, in practice, in many liberal democracies such speech is routinely restricted. In this paper, I develop an argument that is compatible with both the argument from (...)
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  41. Pablo Gilabert (2013). The Capability Approach and the Debate Between Humanist and Political Perspectives on Human Rights. A Critical Survey. Human Rights Review 14 (4):299-325.
    This paper provides a critical exploration of the capability approach to human rights (CAHR) with the specific aim of developing its potential for achieving a synthesis between “humanist” or “naturalistic” and “political” or “practical” perspectives in the philosophy of human rights. Section II presents a general strategy for achieving such a synthesis. Section III provides an articulation of the key insights of CAHR (its focus on actual realizations given diverse circumstances, its pluralism of grounds, its emphasis on freedom of choice, (...)
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  42. Lorenzo Greco (2005). Martha C. Nussbaum, Capacità personale e democrazia sociale (Reggio Emilia: Diabasis, 2003). [REVIEW] Filosofia Politica 19 (2):307-308.
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  43. Peter Higgins, Audra King & April Shaw (2008). What is Poverty? In Rebecca Whisnant & Peggy DesAutels (eds.), Global Feminist Ethics: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory. Rowman & Littlefield
    Invoking three desiderata (empirical adequacy, conceptual precision, and sensitivity to social positioning), this paper argues that poverty is best understood as the deprivation of certain human capabilities. It defends this way of conceiving of poverty against standard alternatives: lack of income, lack of resources, inequality, and social exclusion.
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  44. Keith Hyams (2009). A Just Response to Climate Change: Personal Carbon Allowances and the Normal-Functioning Approach. Journal of Social Philosophy 40 (2):237-256.
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  45. Ramona Ilea (2012). "Review of" Creating Capabilities: The Human Development Approach". [REVIEW] Essays in Philosophy 13 (1):23.
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  46. Norbert Jomann, Frauke A. Kurbacher & Christian Suhm (2001). Universal Capabilities Vs. Cultural Relativism: Nussbaum's Capabilities Approach Under Discussion. In Angela Kallhoff (ed.), Martha C. Nussbaum: Ethics and Political Philosophy: Lecture and Colloquium in Münster 2000. Distributed in North America by Transaction Publishers 4--65.
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  47. R. Kamtekar (2002). Sex and Social Justice; Women and Human Development: The Capabilities Approach. Philosophical Review 111 (2):262-270.
  48. J. Paul Kelleher (2013). Capabilities Versus Resources. Journal of Moral Philosophy 10 (4):151-171.
    What is the correct metric of distributive justice? Proponents of the capability approach claim that distributive metrics should be articulated in terms of individuals’ effective abilities to achieve important and worthwhile goals. Defenders of resourcism, by contrast, maintain that metrics should instead focus on the distribution of external resources. This debate is now more than three decades old, and it has produced a vast and still growing literature. The present paper aims to provide a fresh perspective on this protracted debate. (...)
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  49. Mikko Koria (2009). On Innovation and Capability. Philosophy of Management 7 (2):77-87.
    While innovation is recognised as a key driver of economic growth and competitiveness, less attention has been given to the study of the underpinning capability to be innovative, which is here taken to be the ability to successfully exploit new external knowledge. This conceptual paper examines the parallels between innovation theory in the administrative context and Amartya Sen’s capability approach, a wide vision of human potential and development. It is argued that applying Sen’s approach in this fashion enables a novel (...)
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  50. Iain Law & Heather Widdows (2008). Conceptualising Health: Insights From the Capability Approach. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 16 (4):303-314.
    This paper suggests the adoption of a ‘capability approach’ to key concepts in healthcare. Recent developments in theoretical approaches to concepts such as ‘health’ and ‘disease’ are discussed, and a trend identified of thinking of health as a matter of having the capability to cope with life’s demands. This approach is contrasted with the WHO definition of health and Boorse’s biostatistical account. We outline the ‘capability approach’, which has become standard in development ethics and economics, and show how existing work (...)
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