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  1. Mitchell Aboulafia (2001). The Cosmopolitan Self: George Herbert Mead and Continental Philosophy. Illinois University Press.
    This important volume appreciably advances the dialogue between continental thought and classical American philosophy.
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  2. Judith Andre (2013). Open Hope as a Civic Virtue. Social Philosophy Today 29:89-100.
    Hope as a virtue is an acquired disposition, shaped by reflection; as a civic virtue it must serve the good of the community. Ernst Bloch and Lord Buddha offer help in constructing such a virtue. Using a taxonomy developed by Darren Webb I distinguish open hope from goal-oriented hope, and use each thinker to develop the former. Bloch and Buddha are very different (and notoriously obscure; I do not attempt an exegesis). But they share a metaphysics of change, foundational for (...)
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  3. Arthur James Balfour (1878). The Philosophy of Ethics. Mind 3 (9):67-86.
  4. Dietrich Böhler & Boris Rähme (2004). Karl-Otto Apel. In Gisela Riescher (ed.), Politische Theorie der Gegenwart in Einzeldarstellungen. Von Adorno bis Young. Alfred Kröner Verlag.
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  5. H. G. Callaway (2000). Review: Susan Haack, Manifesto of a Passionate Moderate, Unfashionable Essays. [REVIEW] Erkenntnis 53 (3):407-414.
    Susan Haack presents a striking and appealing figure in contemporary Anglo-American philosophy. In spite of British birth and education, she appears to bridge the gap between analytic philosophy and American pragmatism, with its more diverse influences and sources. Well known for her writings in the philosophy of logic and epistemology, she fuses something of the hard-headed debunking style of a Bertrand Russell with a lively interest in Peirce, James and Dewey.
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  6. Hugh Chandler, Can There Be Conflict Between Conscience and Self-Love?
    Ethical dualists hold that we have good reason to pursue our own happiness and good reason to pursue moral goodness. It would seem that there is a potential conflict here. On the other hand there have been those who deny even the possibility of conflict, whether or not there is a God and an afterlife. Rawls seems to say, or hint, that this was Butlers’ view, and Kant, according to at least one person, argued that there cannot be conflict here. (...)
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  7. Ruth Chang (2001). Review: Two Conceptions of Reasons for Action. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 62 (2):447 - 453.
    On a ‘comparative’ conception of practical reasons, reasons are like ‘weights’ that can make an action more or less rational. Bernard Gert adopts instead a ‘toggle’ conception of practical reasons: something counts as a reason just in case it alone can make some or other otherwise irrational action rational. I suggest that Gert’s conception suffers from various defects, and that his motivation for adopting this conception – his central claim that actions can be rational without there being reasons for them (...)
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  8. T. D. J. Chappell (ed.) (2009). The Problem of Moral Demandingness: New Philosophical Essays. Palgrave Macmillan.
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  9. John Charvet (1993). S. L. Hurley, Natural Reasons: Personality and Polity, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1989, Pp. Xii + 462. Utilitas 5 (02):321-.
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  10. Shlomo Cohen, Conversations on Ethics.
    In his book, Conversations on Ethics, Alex Voorhoeve interviews eleven prominent moral philosophers about central aspects of their views as well as about their intellectual development.1 In their order of appearance, these are: Frances Kamm, Peter Singer, Daniel Kahneman, Philippa Foot, Alasdair MacIntyre, Ken Binmore, Allan Gibbard, Thomas Scanlon, Bernard Williams, Harry Frankfurt, and David Velleman. The book is both richly instructive and delightful to read. Voorhoeve has a sophisticated command of his interlocutorsʼ philosophical views, and his questions often (...)
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  11. Rory J. Conces (2000). Review of The Dalai Lama, Ethics for the New Millennium. [REVIEW] International Third World Studies Journal and Review 11:49-51.
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  12. Stephen Cooke (forthcoming). Perpetual Strangers: Animals and the Cosmopolitan Right. Political Studies.
    In this article I propose a cosmopolitan approach to animal rights based upon Kant's right of universal hospitality. Many approaches to animal rights buttress their arguments by finding similarities between humans and non-human animals; in this way they represent or resemble ethics of partiality. In this article I propose an approach to animal rights that initially rejects similarity approaches and is instead based upon the adoption of a cosmopolitan mindset acknowledging and respecting difference. Furthermore, and in agreement with Martha Nussbaum, (...)
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  13. Claudio Corradetti (2010). Rights. In Richard Corrigan (ed.), Ethics: A University Guide.
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  14. Lachlan Doughney (2012). Ayn Rand and Deducing 'Ought' From 'Is'. Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 12 (1):151-168.
    The article discusses how and why philosopher Ayn Rand attempted to deduce an ought conclusion from only is premises. It contends that Rand did attempt to deduce what one ought and ought not do from what is or is not the case. It argues that Rand attempted to provide a universally objective unshakable normative moral claim, that people ought to act in accordance with her value and virtue system.
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  15. Martin Drenthen (2011). 'Reading Ourselves Through the Land: Landscape Hermeneutics and Ethics of Place. In Forrest Clingerman Clingerman & Mark Dixon (eds.), 'Reading ourselves through the land: landscape hermeneutics and ethics of place', in: F. Clingerman & M. Dixon (Eds.): Placing Nature on the Borders of Religion, Philosophy, and Ethics. Ashgate.
    In this text, I discuss the environmental education project "Legible Landscape", which aims to teach inhabitants to read their landscape and develop a closer, more engaged relationship to place. I show that the project's semiotic perspective on landscape legibility tends to hamper the understanding of the moral dimension of reading landscapes, and argue that a hermeneutical perspective is better suited to acknowledge the way that readers and texts are intimately connected.
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  16. Robert M. Ellis (2011). A New Buddhist Ethics. Lulu.com.
    This book is a survey of practical moral issues applying the Middle Way (as developed in 'A Theory of Moral Objectivity') as the basis of 'Buddhist' Ethics. No appeal is made to Buddhist traditions or scriptures, but instead the Middle Way is applied consistently as a universal philosophical and practical principle to suggest the direction of resolutions to moral debates. Practical ethics topics covered include sexual ethics, medical ethics, environmental ethics, animals, violence, the arts, scientific issues and political ethics.
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  17. Eva Erman (2005). Human Rights and Democracy: Discourse Theory and Human Rights Institutions. Ashgate.
    This volume explores the relationship between human rights and democracy within both the theoretical and empirical field.
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  18. Roberto Frega (2011). Le perfectionisme à l'épreuve du pragmatisme. Dialogue 50 (1):1-22.
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  19. Christopher Freiman (2012). Why Poverty Matters Most: Towards a Humanitarian Theory of Social Justice. Utilitas 24 (01):26-40.
    Sufficientarians claim that what matters most is that people have enough. I develop and defend a revised sufficientarian conception of justice. I claim that it furnishes the best specification of a general humanitarian ideal of social justice: our main moral concern should be helping those who are badly off in absolute terms. Rival humanitarian views such as egalitarianism, prioritarianism and the difference principle face serious objections from which sufficientarianism is exempt. Moreover, a revised conception of sufficientarianism can meet the most (...)
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  20. Jon Garthoff (2012). Review of Christian Miller (Ed.), The Continuum Companion to Ethics. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Review.
  21. Jon Garthoff (2011). Meriting Concern and Meriting Respect. Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 5 (2).
  22. Jon Garthoff (2011). Review of Alex Voorhoeve, Conversations on Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Moral Philosophy 8 (4).
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  23. Alan Gewirth (1960). Meta-Ethics and Normative Ethics. Mind 69 (274):187-205.
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  24. Allan Gibbard (1995). Review: Why Theorize How to Live with Each Other? [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 55 (2):323 - 342.
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  25. Pablo Gilabert (2005). Should Discourse Ethics Do Without a Principle of Universalization? Philosophical Forum 36 (2):183–191.
  26. Grant Gillett (2009). The Subjective Brain, Identity, and Neuroethics. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (9):5-13.
    The human brain is subjective and reflects the life of a being-in-the-world-with-others whose identity reflects that complex engaged reality. Human subjectivity is shaped and in-formed (formed by inner processes) that are adapted to the human life-world and embody meaning and the relatedness of a human being. Questions of identity relate to this complex and dynamic reality to reflect the fact that biology, human ecology, culture, and one's historic-political situation are inscribed in one's neural network and have configured its architecture so (...)
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  27. Holly S. Goldman (1978). Doing the Best One Can. In Alvin Goldman & Jaegwon Kim (eds.), Values and Morals. Reidel. 185--214.
  28. Patricia Greenspan (2010). Making Room for Options: Moral Reasons, Imperfect Duties, and Choice. Social Philosophy and Policy 27 (2):181-205.
    The notion of an “imperfect” obligation or duty, which most of us associate with Kantian ethics, affords a way of mitigating morality’s demands, while recognizing moral obligation as “binding” or inescapable, in Kant’s terms – something an agent cannot get out of just by appealing to ends or priorities of her own.2 Understood as duties of indeterminate content, imperfect duties such as the charitable duty to aid those in need leave leeway for personal choice – of whom to aid and (...)
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  29. Chris Heathwood (2007). Book Note on Mark Timmons, Moral Theory. [REVIEW] Ethics 117:797-98.
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  30. Ingeborg Heidemann (1961). Das problem der allgemeingültigkeit in der ethik. Kant-Studien 52 (1-4):33-42.
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  31. Laurent Jaffro (2007). Berkeley's Criticism of Shaftesbury's Moral Theory in Alciphron III. In Stephen H. Daniel (ed.), Reexamining Berkeley's Philosophy.
  32. Klemens Kappel (2002). Against Hegemonism in Moral Theory. Utilitas 14 (02):219-.
    What I call hegemonism holds that a satisfactory moral theory must in a fairly direct way guide action. This, the hegemonist believes, provides a constraint on moral theorizing. We should not accept moral theories which cannot in the proper sense guide us. There are two alternatives to hegemonism. One is motivational indirection, which is the idea that while agents remain motivated by a moral theory, they may be only indirectly motivated. The other is non-hegemonism, which holds that a correct moral (...)
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  33. P. J. Kelly (1996). Introduction. Utilitas 8 (03):261-.
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  34. Eran Klein (2011). Is There a Need for Clinical Neuroskepticism? Neuroethics 4 (3):251-259.
    Clinical neuroethics and neuroskepticism are recent entrants to the vocabulary of neuroethics. Clinical neuroethics has been used to distinguish problems of clinical relevance arising from developments in brain science from problems arising in neuroscience research proper. Neuroskepticism has been proposed as a counterweight to claims about the value and likely implications of developments in neuroscience. These two emergent streams of thought intersect within the practice of neurology. Neurologists face many traditional problems in bioethics, like end of life care in the (...)
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  35. Hugh LaFollette (ed.) (2013). The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
  36. Hugh LaFollette (2007). The Practice of Ethics. Blackwell Pub..
    The Practice of Ethics is an outstanding guide to the burgeoning field of applied ethics, and offers a coherent narrative that is both theoretically and pragmatically grounded for framing practical issues. Discusses a broad range of contemporary issues such as racism, euthanasia, animal rights, and gun control. Argues that ethics must be put into practice in order to be effective. Draws upon relevant insights from history, psychology, sociology, law and biology, as well as philosophy. An excellent companion to LaFollette's authoritative (...)
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  37. Hugh LaFollette (ed.) (2000/2001). The Blackwell Guide to Ethical Theory. Blackwell.
    This volume is arguably the most ambitious and authoritative survey of ethical theory available today.
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  38. Arto Laitinen, Social Equality, Recognition, and Preconditions of Good Life. Social Inequality Today.
    In this paper I analyze interpersonal and institutional recognition and discuss the relation of different types of recognition to various principles of social justice (egalitarianism, meritarianism, legitimate favouritism, principles of need and free exchange). Further, I try to characterize contours of good autonomous life, and ask what kind of preconditions it has. I will distinguish between five kinds of preconditions: psychological, material, cultural, intersubjective and institutional. After examining what the role of recognition is among such preconditions, and how they figure (...)
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  39. Hallvard Lillehammer (2010). Scanlon on Intention and Permissibility. Analysis 70 (3):578 - 585.
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  40. Bryan Lueck (2014). On Cosmopolitanisms. In Lucian Stone (ed.), Iranian Identity and Cosmopolitanism: Spheres of Belonging. Bloomsbury. 159-175.
  41. Joel Marks (2000). Moral Moments: Very Short Essays on Ethics. University Press of America.
    Very short essays, including op-ed articles, about ethical situations and issues in everyday life.
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  42. Christopher J. G. Meacham (2012). Person-Affecting Views and Saturating Counterpart Relations. Philosophical Studies 158 (2):257-287.
    In Reasons and Persons, Parfit (1984) posed a challenge: provide a satisfying normative account that solves the Non-Identity Problem, avoids the Repugnant and Absurd Conclusions, and solves the Mere-Addition Paradox. In response, some have suggested that we look toward person-affecting views of morality for a solution. But the person-affecting views that have been offered so far have been unable to satisfy Parfit's four requirements, and these views have been subject to a number of independent complaints. This paper describes a person-affecting (...)
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  43. Michael A. Menlowe (2005). Robert George, in Defense of Natural Law, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2001, Pp. 343. Utilitas 17 (1):119-121.
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  44. Thaddeus Metz (2007). Toward an African Moral Theory. Journal of Political Philosophy 15 (3):321–341.
    In this article I articulate and defend an African moral theory, i.e., a basic and general principle grounding all particular duties that is informed by sub-Saharan values commonly associated with talk of "ubuntu" and cognate terms that signify personhood or humanness. The favoured interpretation of ubuntu is the principle that an action is right insofar as it respects harmonious relationships, ones in which people identify with, and exhibit solidarity toward, one another. I maintain that this is the most defensible moral (...)
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  45. Tim Mulgan (2003). Liam Murphy, Moral Demands in Nonideal Theory, New York, Oxford University Press, 2000, Pp. Viii + 168. Utilitas 15 (01):113-.
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  46. Rekha Nath (forthcoming). Two Wrong Don't Make a Right: A Critique of Virgina Held's Deontological Justification of Terrorism. Social Theory and Practice.
    Virginia Held argues that terrorism can be justified in some instances. But unlike standard, consequentialist justifications, hers is deontological. This paper critically examines her argument. It explores how the values of fairness, responsibility, and desert can serve to justify acts of terrorism. In doing so, two interpretations of her account are considered: a responsibility-insensitive and a responsibility-sensitive interpretation. On the first, her argument collapses into a consequentialist justification. On the second, it relies on an implausible conception of responsibility. Either way, (...)
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  47. Richard Norman (2000). Applied Ethics: What is Applied to What? Utilitas 12 (02):119-.
    This paper criticizes the conception of applied ethics as the top-down application of a theory to practical issues. It is argued that a theory such as utilitarianism cannot override our intuitive moral perceptions. We cannot be radically mistaken about the kinds of considerations which count as practical reasons, and it is the task of theoretical ethics to articulate the basic kinds of considerations which we appeal to in practical discussions. Dworkin's model of doing ethics is used to illustrate the appropriate (...)
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  48. Seungbae Park (2014). Cultural Relativism and the Theory of Relativity. Filosofija. Sociologija 25 (1):44-51.
    Cornea (2012) argues that I (2011) was wrong to use the analogy between morality and motion to defend cultural relativism. I reply that the analogy can be used to clarify what cultural relativism asserts and how a cultural relativist can reply to the criticisms against it. Ockham’s Razor favours the relativist view that there are no moral truths, and hence no culture is better than another. Contrary to what Cornea claims, cultural relativism does not entail that we cannot protect ourselves (...)
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  49. Thomas Søbirk Petersen (2003). Egalitarianism and Repugnant Conclusions. Danish Yearbook of Philosophy 38:115-125.
    Most philosophers discuss the Repugnant Conclusion as an objection to total utilitarianism. But this focus on total utilitarianism seems to be one-sided. It conceals the important fact that other competing moral theories are also subject to the Repugnant Conclusion. The primary aim of this paper is to demonstrate that versions of egalitarianism are subject to the Repugnant Conclusion and other repugnant conclusions.
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  50. Martin Peterson & Sven Ove Hansson (2005). Equality and Priority. Utilitas 17 (3):299-309.
    This article argues that, contrary to the received view, prioritarianism and egalitarianism are not jointly incompatible theories in normative ethics. By introducing a distinction between weighing and aggregating, the authors show that the seemingly conflicting intuitions underlying prioritarianism and egalitarianism are consistent. The upshot is a combined position, equality-prioritarianism, which takes both prioritarian and egalitarian considerations into account in a technically precise manner. On this view, the moral value of a distribution of well-being is a product of two factors: the (...)
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