Related categories
Subcategories:
804 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 804
Material to categorize
  1. Jose Luis Bermudez (1997). Defending Intentionalist Accounts of Self-Deception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (1):107-108.
    This commentary defends intentionalist accounts of self-deception against Mele by arguing that: (1) viewing self-deception on the model of other-deception is not as paradoxical as Mele makes out; (2) the paradoxes are not entailed by the view that self-deception is intentional; and (3) there are two problems for Mele's theory that only an intentionalist theory can solve.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Robert F. Bornstein (1997). Varieties of Self-Deception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (1):108-109.
    Mele's analysis of self-deception is persuasive but it might also be useful to consider the varieties of self-deception that occur in real-world settings. Instances of self-deception can be classified along three dimensions: implicit versus explicit, motivated versus process-based, and public versus private. All three types of self-deception have implications for the scientific research enterprise.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Peggy Desautels (1998). Psychologies of Moral Perceivers. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 22 (1):266-280.
  4. William B. Irvine (2007). On Desire: Why We Want What We Want. OUP USA.
    A married person falls deeply in love with someone else. A man of average income feels he cannot be truly happy unless he owns an expensive luxury car. A dieter has an irresistible craving for ice cream. Desires often come to us unbidden and unwanted, and they can have a dramatic impact, sometimes changing the course of our lives. In On Desire, William B. Irvine takes us on a wide-ranging tour of our impulses, wants, and needs, showing us where these (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Guy Kahane (2013). The Armchair and the Trolley: An Argument for Experimental Ethics. Philosophical Studies 162 (2):421-445.
    Ethical theory often starts with our intuitions about particular cases and tries to uncover the principles that are implicit in them; work on the ‘trolley problem’ is a paradigmatic example of this approach. But ethicists are no longer the only ones chasing trolleys. In recent years, psychologists and neuroscientists have also turned to study our moral intuitions and what underlies them. The relation between these two inquiries, which investigate similar examples and intuitions, and sometimes produce parallel results, is puzzling. Does (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. L. May, Michael Friedman & A. Clark (eds.) (1996). Mind and Morals: Essays on Ethics and Cognitive Science. MIT Press.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Mark Phelan (2012). Elements of Moral Cognition by John Mikhail. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Katinka J. P. Quintelier & Daniel M. T. Fessler (2011). Naturalizing the Normative and the Bridges Between “is” and “Ought”. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (5):266.
    Elqayam & Evans (E&E) suggest descriptivism as a way to avoid fallacies and research biases. We argue, first, that descriptive and prescriptive theories might be better off with a closer interaction between and Moreover, while we acknowledge the problematic nature of the discussed fallacies and biases, important aspects of research would be lost through a broad application of descriptivism.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Tiziano Raffaelli (1996). Utilitarian Premises and the Evolutionary Framework of Marshall's Economics. Utilitas 8 (01):89-.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. G. F. Schueler (1997). Book Review:Mind and Morals: Essays on Ethics and Cognitive Science. Larry May, Marilyn Friedman, Andy Clark. [REVIEW] Ethics 107 (2):349-.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Peter Singer (1995). Is There a Universal Moral Sense? Critical Review 9 (3):325-339.
    There is now increasing evidence for significant ?moral universals??that is, patterns of ethical principles that are recognized by virtually every human society. James Q. Wilson has assembled an engaging collection of this evidence for the existence of a ?moral sense.? At least in regard to the universality of the key features of sympathy and a sense of fairness or reciprocity, Wilson is right. Indeed, these features are even more universal than Wilson realizes: they extend to our closest nonhuman relatives as (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. David Livingstone Smith (2013). Beyond Good and Evil: Variations on Some Freudian Themes. In A. C. Bohart B. S. Held & E. Mendelowitz K. J. Schneider (eds.), Humanity's Dark Side: Evil, Destructive Experience, and Psychotherapy. American Psychological Association. 193-212.
    The paper critically interrogates the claim that Freudian theory is morally nihillistic.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Mark Timmons (1997). Will Cognitive Science Change Ethics?: Review Essay of Larry May, Marilyn Friedman & Andy Clark (Eds) Mind and Morals: Essays on Ethics and Cognitive Science. Philosophical Psychology 10 (4):531 – 540.
    This paper contains an overview of the essays contained in the Mind and morals anthology plus a critical discussion of certain themes raised in many of these essays concerning the bearing of recent work in cognitive science on the traditional project of moral theory. Specifically, I argue for the following claims: (1) authors like Virginia Held, who appear to be antagonistic toward the methodological naturalism of Owen Flanagan, Andy Clark, Paul Churchland, and others, are really in fundamental agreement with the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
Evolution of Morality
  1. Linda Abarbanell & Marc D. Hauser (2010). Mayan Morality: An Exploration of Permissible Harms. Cognition 115 (2):207-224.
    Anthropologists have provided rich field descriptions of the norms and conventions governing behavior and interactions in small-scale societies. Here, we add a further dimension to this work by presenting hypothetical moral dilemmas involving harm, to a small-scale, agrarian Mayan population, with the specific goal of exploring the hypothesis that certain moral principles apply universally. We presented Mayan participants with moral dilemmas translated into their native language, Tseltal. Paralleling several studies carried out with educated subjects living in large-scale, developed nations, the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Zed Adams (2007). The Evolution of Morality by Joyce, Richard. [REVIEW] Ethics 117 (2).
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Zed Adams (2007). Frans de Waal, Primates and Philosophers: How Morality Evolved:Primates and Philosophers: How Morality Evolved. Ethics 117 (3):552-555.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Zed Adams (2007). Richard Joyce, The Evolution of Morality. [REVIEW] Ethics 117 (2):363-369.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Nicholas Agar (2002). Agar's Review of Katz. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 17 (1):123-139.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Max Albert & Hannes Rusch, Indirect Reciprocity, Golden Opportunities for Defection, and Inclusive Reputation. MAGKS Discussion Paper Series in Economics.
    In evolutionary models of indirect reciprocity, reputation mechanisms can stabilize cooperation even in severe cooperation problems like the prisoner’s dilemma. Under certain circumstances, conditionally cooperative strategies, which cooperate iff their partner has a good reputation, cannot be invaded by any other strategy that conditions behavior only on own and partner reputation. The first point of this paper is to show that an evolutionary version of backward induction can lead to a breakdown of this kind of indirectly reciprocal cooperation. Backward induction, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. J. McKenzie Alexander, Reconciling Morality with the Theory of Rational Choice Via Evolution.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. J. McKenzie Alexander (2007). The Structural Evolution of Morality. Cambridge University Press.
    It is certainly the case that morality governs the interactions that take place between individuals. But what if morality exists because of these interactions? This book argues for the claim that much of the behaviour we view as 'moral' exists because acting in that way benefits each of us to the greatest extent possible, given the socially structured nature of society. Drawing upon aspects of evolutionary game theory, the theory of bounded rationality, and computational models of social networks, it shows (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. J. McKenzie Alexander (2000). Evolutionary Explanations of Distributive Justice. Philosophy of Science 67 (3):490-516.
    Evolutionary game theoretic accounts of justice attempt to explain our willingness to follow certain principles of justice by appealing to robustness properties possessed by those principles. Skyrms (1996) offers one sketch of how such an account might go for divide-the-dollar, the simplest version of the Nash bargaining game, using the replicator dynamics of Taylor and Jonker (1978). In a recent article, D'Arms et al. (1998) criticize his account and describe a model which, they allege, undermines his theory. I sketch a (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Richard D. Alexander (1993). Biological Considerations in the Analysis of Morality. In Matthew Nitecki & Doris Nitecki (eds.), Evolutionary Ethics. Suny Press. 163--196.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Douglas Allchin (2009). The Evolution of Morality. Evolution 2 (4):590-601.
    Here, in textbook style, is a concise biological account of the evolution of morality. It addresses morality on three levels: moral outcomes (behavioral genetics), moral motivation or intent (psychology and neurology), and moral systems (sociality). The rationale for teaching this material is addressed in Allchin (2009). Classroom resources (including accompanying images and video links) and a discussion of teaching strategies are provided online at: http://EvolutionOfMorality.net.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Douglas Allchin (2009). Teaching the Evolution of Morality: Status and Resources. Evolution 2 (4):629-635.
    Recent studies now provide a relatively robust explanation of how moral behavior evolved, perhaps not just in humans. An analysis of current biology textbooks shows that they fail to address this critical topic fully. Here, I survey resources—books, images, and videos—that can guide educators in meeting the challenge of teaching the biology of morality.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Colin Allen & Marc Bekoff (2005). Animal Play and the Evolution of Morality: An Ethological Approach. Topoi 24 (2):125-135.
    In this paper we argue that there is much to learn about “wild justice” and the evolutionary origins of morality – behaving fairly – by studying social play behavior in group-living mammals. Because of its relatively wide distribution among the mammals, ethological investigation of play, informed by interdisciplinary cooperation, can provide a comparative perspective on the evolution of ethical behavior that is broader than is provided by the usual focus on primate sociality. Careful analysis of social play reveals rules of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Fritz Allhoff (2009). The Evolution of the Moral Sentiments and the Metaphysics of Morals. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 12 (1):97 - 114.
    So-called evolutionary error theorists, such as Michael Ruse and Richard Joyce, have argued that naturalistic accounts of the moral sentiments lead us to adopt an error theory approach to morality. Roughly, the argument is that an appreciation of the etiology of those sentiments undermines any reason to think that they track moral truth and, furthermore, undermines any reason to think that moral truth actually exists. I argue that this approach offers us a false dichotomy between error theory and some form (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Fritz Allhoff (2003). Evolutionary Ethics From Darwin to Moore. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 25 (1):51 - 79.
    Evolutionary ethics has a long history, dating all the way back to Charles Darwin.1 Almost immediately after the publication of the Origin, an immense interest arose in the moral implications of Darwinism and whether the truth of Darwinism would undermine traditional ethics. Though the biological thesis was certainly exciting, nobody suspected that the impact of the Origin would be confined to the scientific arena. As one historian wrote, 'whether or not ancient populations of armadillos were transformed into the species that (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Keith Ansell-Pearson (2014). Morality and the Philosophy of Life in Guyau and Bergson. Continental Philosophy Review 47 (1):59-85.
    In this essay I examine the contribution a philosophy of life is able to make to our understanding of morality, including our appreciation of its evolution or development and its future. I focus on two contributions, namely, those of Jean-Marie Guyau and Henri Bergson. In the case of Guyau I show that he pioneers the naturalistic study of morality through a conception of life; for him the moral progress of humanity is bound up with an increasing sociability, involving both the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Larry Arnhart (2001). Thomistic Natural Law as Darwinian Natural Right. Social Philosophy and Policy 18 (1):1-33.
    The publication in 1975 of Edward O. Wilson's Sociobiology provoked a great controversy, for in that work Wilson claimed that ethics was rooted in human biology. On the first page of the book, he asserted that our deepest intuitions of right and wrong are guided by the emotional control centers of the brain, which evolved via natural selection to help the human animal exploit opportunities and avoid threats in the natural environment. In 1998, the publication of Wilson's Consilience renewed the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Larry Arnhart (1998). The New Darwinian Naturalism in Political Theory. Zygon 33 (3):369-393.
  19. Francisco Ayala (2010). What the Biological Sciences Can and Cannot Contribute to Ethics. In Francisco José Ayala & Robert Arp (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Philosophy of Biology. Wiley-Blackwell Pub..
    The question whether ethical behavior is biologically determined may refer either to the capacity for ethics (i.e., the proclivity to judge human actions as either right or wrong), or to the moral norms accepted by human beings for guiding their actions. I herein propose: (1) that the capacity for ethics is a necessary attribute of human nature; and (2) that moral norms are products of cultural evolution, not of biological evolution. Humans exhibit ethical behavior by nature because their biological makeup (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Francisco Ayala (2006). Biology to Ethics: An Evolutionist's View of Human Nature. In Giovanni Boniolo & Gabriele De Anna (eds.), Evolutionary Ethics and Contemporary Biology. Cambridge University Press. 141--158.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Francisco J. Ayala (2010). The Biological Foundations of Ethics. Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 66 (3):523 - 537.
    Erect posture and large brain are two of the most significant anatomical traits that distinguish us from nonhuman primates. But humans are also different from chimpanzees and other animals, and no less importantly, in their behavior, both as individuals and socially. Distinctive human behavioral attributes include tool-making and technology; abstract thinking, categorizing, and reasoning; symbolic (creative) language; self-awareness and death-awareness; science, literature, and art; legal codes, ethics and religion; complex social organization and political institutions. These traits may all be said (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Francisco J. Ayala (1987). The Biological Roots of Morality. Biology and Philosophy 2 (3):235-252.
    The question whether ethical behavior is biologically determined may refer either to thecapacity for ethics (e.i., the proclivity to judge human actions as either right or wrong), or to the moralnorms accepted by human beings for guiding their actions. My theses are: (1) that the capacity for ethics is a necessary attribute of human nature; and (2) that moral norms are products of cultural evolution, not of biological evolution.Humans exhibits ethical behavior by nature because their biological makeup determines the presence (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Francisco José Ayala (1967). Man in Evolution: A Scientific Statement and Some Theological and Ethical Implications. The Thomist 31:1-20.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Giovanni Felice Azzone (2003). The Dual Biological Identity of Human Beings and the Naturalization of Morality. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 25 (2):211 - 241.
    The last two centuries have been the centuries of the discovery of the cell evolution: in the XIX century of the germinal cells and in the XX century of two groups of somatic cells, namely those of the brain-mind and of the immune systems. Since most cells do not behave in this way, the evolutionary character of the brain-mind and of the immune systems renders human beings formed by two different groups of somatic cells, one with a deterministic and another (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Elizabeth Baeten (2012). Another Defense of Naturalized Ethics. Metaphilosophy 43 (5):533-550.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Elizabeth Baeten (2004). Evolution and Ethics: Together Again? Studies in Practical Philosophy 4 (2):3-22.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Julian Baggini (1998). Darwin and Ethics. The Philosophers' Magazine 4:49-49.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Stephen W. Ball (1995). Gibbard's Evolutionary Theory of Rationality and its Ethical Implications. Biology and Philosophy 10 (2):129-180.
    Gibbard''s theory of rationality is evolutionary in terms of its result as well as its underpinning argument. The result is that judgments about what is rational are analyzed as being similar to judgments of morality — in view of what Darwin suggests concerning the latter. According to the Darwinian theory, moral judgments are based on sentiments which evolve to promote the survival and welfare of human societies. On Gibbard''s theory, rationality judgments should be similarly regarded as expressing emotional attachments to (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Stephen W. Ball (1992). Morality Among Nations: An Evolutionary View. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 7 (3):361-377.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Stephen W. Ball (1988). Evolution, Explanation, and the Fact/Value Distinction. Biology and Philosophy 3 (3):317-348.
    Though modern non-cognitivists in ethics characteristically believe that values are irreducible to facts, they nevertheless believe that values are determined by facts, viz., those specified in functionalist, explanatory theories of the evolutionary origin of morality. The present paper probes the consistency of this position. The conventionalist theories of Hume and Harman are examined, and are seen not to establish a tight determinative reduction of values to facts. This result is illustrated by reference to recent theories of the sociobiological mechanisms involved (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Terence Ball (1981). Book Review:Darwinism and Human Affairs. Richard D. Alexander. [REVIEW] Ethics 92 (1):161-.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Albert G. A. Balz (1926). Evolution in Morals or the Evolution of Morals? Journal of Philosophy 23 (13):337-348.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Jonathan Barrett (1991). Really Taking Darwin and the Naturalistic Fallacy Seriously: An Objection to Rottschaefer and Martinsen. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 6 (4):433-437.
    Out of a concern to respect the naturalistic fallacy, Ruse (1986) argues for the possibility of causal, but not justificatory, explanations of morality in terms of evolutionary processes. In a discussion of Ruse's work, Rottschaefer and Martinsen (1990) claim that he erroneously limits the explanatory scope of evolutionary concepts, because he fails to see that one can have objective moral properties without committing either of two forms of the naturalistic fallacy, if one holds that moral properties supervene on non-moral properties. (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. L. A. Barricelli (1997). The Interaction Between Morality and Society--Its Evolutionary Mechanism. Journal of Human Values 3 (2):173-180.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Patrick Bateson (1989). Does Evolutionary Biology Contribute to Ethics? Biology and Philosophy 4 (3):287-301.
    Human propensities that are the products of Darwinian evolution may combine to generate a form of social behavior that is not itself a direct result of such pressure. This possibility may provide a satisfying explanation for the origin of socially transmitted rules such as the incest taboo. Similarly, the regulatory processes of development that generated adaptations to the environment in the circumstances in which they evolved can produce surprising and sometimes maladaptive consequences for the individual in modern conditions. These combinatorial (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Nicolas Baumard, Jean-Baptiste André & Dan Sperber (2013). A Mutualistic Approach to Morality: The Evolution of Fairness by Partner Choice. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (1):59-122.
    What makes humans moral beings? This question can be understood either as a proximate question or as an ultimate question. The question is about the mental and social mechanisms that produce moral judgments and interactions, and has been investigated by psychologists and social scientists. The question is about the fitness consequences that explain why humans have morality, and has been discussed by evolutionary biologists in the context of the evolution of cooperation. Our goal here is to contribute to a fruitful (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Nicolas Baumard, Jean-Baptiste André & Dan Sperber (2013). Partner Choice, Fairness, and the Extension of Morality. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (1):102-122.
    Our discussion of the commentaries begins, at the evolutionary level, with issues raised by our account of the evolution of morality in terms of partner-choice mutualism. We then turn to the cognitive level and the characterization and workings of fairness. In a final section, we discuss the degree to which our fairness-based approach to morality extends to norms that are commonly considered moral even though they are distinct from fairness.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 804