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  1. Howard Adelman (2009). Research on the Ethics of War in the Context of Violence in Gaza. Journal of Academic Ethics 7 (1-2):93-113.
    The paper first demonstrates the ability to provode objective data and analyses during war and then examines the need for such objective gathering of data and analysis in the context of mass violence and war, specifically in the 2009 Gaza War. That data and analysis is required to assess compliance with just war norms in assessing the conduct of the war, a framework quite distinct from human rights norms that can misapply and deform the application of norms such as proportionality (...)
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  2. Babafemi Akinrinade (2001). International Humanitarian Law and the Conflict in Sierra Leone. Notre Dame Journal of Law, Ethics and Public Policy 15 (2):391-454.
  3. Lawrence A. Alexander (1976). Self-Defense and the Killing of Noncombatants: A Reply to Fullinwider. Philosophy and Public Affairs 5 (4):408-415.
  4. Andrew Alexandra, Deane-Peter Baker & Marina Caparini (eds.) (2008). Private Military and Security Companies: Ethics, Policies and Civil-Military Relations. Routledge.
  5. Fritz Alhoff & Nicholas Evans (eds.) (forthcoming). Not Just Wars.
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  6. T. Allen (1995). Anthropology and International Intervention. Journal of Biosocial Science 27 (2):252-252.
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  7. Fritz Allhoff (ed.) (forthcoming). Not Just Wars. Routledge.
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  8. Mark J. Allman & Tobias L. Winright (2012). Growing Edges of Just War Theory: Jus Ante Bellum, Jus Post Bellum, and Imperfect Justice. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 32 (2):173-191.
  9. Andrew Altman & Christopher Heath Wellman (2008). From Humanitarian Intervention to Assassination: Human Rights and Political Violence. Ethics 118 (2):228-257.
  10. S. Andrew C. Varga (1985). "Playing God": The Ethics of Biotechnical Intervention. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 60 (2):181-195.
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  11. Larry May Andrew Forcehimes (ed.) (2012). Morality, Just Post Bellum and International Law. Cambridge University Press.
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  12. C. Varga Andrew (1985). " Playing God": The Ethics of Biotechnical Intervention. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 60 (237).
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  13. Andrei Andrianov, Victor Kanke, Ilya Kuptsov & Viktor Murogov (2015). Reexamining the Ethics of Nuclear Technology. Science and Engineering Ethics 21 (4):999-1018.
    This article analyzes the present status, development trends, and problems in the ethics of nuclear technology in light of a possible revision of its conceptual foundations. First, to better recognize the current state of nuclear technology ethics and related problems, this article focuses on presenting a picture of the evolution of the concepts and recent achievements related to technoethics, based on the ethics of responsibility. The term ‘ethics of nuclear technology’ describes a multidisciplinary endeavor to examine the problems associated with (...)
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  14. Richard Arneson, Just Warfare Theory and Noncombatant Immunity.
    ..............................................................................................101 I. The Idea of a Noncombatant ........................................................104 II. The Moral Shield Protecting Noncombatants.............................106 A. Accommodation.......................................................................107 B. Guilty Past ...............................................................................107 C. Guilty Bystander Trying to Inflict Harm .................................109 D. Guilty Bystander Disposed to Inflict Harm .............................109 E. Guilty Bystander Exulting in Anticipated Evil ........................109 F. Fault Forfeits First Doctrine in Just Warfare ...........................110 III. Noncombatants as Wrongful Trespassers ...................................110 IV. The Noncombatant Status of Captured Soldiers ........................111 V. Guerrilla Combat ..........................................................................116 VI. Morally Innocent Unjust Combatants.........................................118 VII. Should Rights Reflect What (...)
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  15. Jovan Babić, Etika Rata I „Teorija Pravednog Rata“.
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  16. Jovan Babic (2007). Non-Culpable Ignorance and Just War Theory. Filozofija I Društvo 18 (3):59-68.
    The so called ′non-culpable ignorance′ is an instrument to justify participating in a war on a defeated side, on condition that fighters sincerely believe that they are defending a just cause and had some valid reasons to believe in having a chance to win. Within the just war theory this instrument is needed to make both sides prima facie right, otherwise the theory would imply that those who lose are guilty in advance, especially if they are the weaker side. However, (...)
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  17. Jovan Babić (1995). War as a phenomenon and as a practice. Theoria 38 (2):7-34.
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  18. Alain Badiou (2006). Polemics. Verso.
    PT. 1. PHILOSOPHY AND CIRCUMSTANCES: Introduction -- Philosophy and the question of war today: 1. On September 11 2001: philosophy and the 'War against terrorism' -- 2. Fragments of a public journal on the American war against Iraq -- 3. On the war against Serbia: who strikes whom in the world today? -- The 'democratic' fetish and racism: 4. On parliamentary 'democracy': the French presidential elections of 2002 -- 5. The law on the Islamic headscarf -- 6. Daily humiliation -- (...)
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  19. Helmut David Baer & Joseph E. Capizzi (2005). Just War Theories Reconsidered: Problems with Prima Facie Duties and the Need for a Political Ethic. Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (1):119-137.
    This essay challenges a "meta-theory" in just war analysis that purports to bridge the divide between just war and pacifism. According to the meta-theory, just war and pacifism share a common presumption against killing that can be overridden only under conditions stipulated by the just war criteria. Proponents of this meta-theory purport that their interpretation leads to ecumenical consensus between "just warriors" and pacifists, and makes the just war theory more effective in reducing recourse to war. Engagement with the new (...)
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  20. John Baker Jr (2005). Competing Paradigms of Constitutional Power in "The War on Terrorism". Notre Dame Journal of Law, Ethics and Public Policy 19 (1):5-32.
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  21. Deane‐Peter Baker (2015). Epistemic Uncertainty and Excusable Wars. Philosophical Forum 46 (1):55-69.
  22. Etienne Balibar (2008). What's in a War? (Politics as War, War as Politics). Ratio Juris 21 (3):365-386.
    Abstract. This paper combines reflections on the current "state of war" in the Middle East with an epistemological discussion of the meaning and implications of the category "war" itself, in order to dissipate the confusions arising from the idea of a "War on Terror." The first part illustrates the insufficiency of the ideal type involved in dichotomies which are implicit in the naming and classifications of wars. They point nevertheless to a deeper problem which concerns the antinomic character of a (...)
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  23. Spencer Baraki (2011). The New Humanitarian Precedent. The Lyceum 1 (1):5-21.
    Explores the history and background of "humanitarian" intervention with regards to Libya.
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  24. A. D. Barder & F. Debrix (2011). Agonal Sovereignty: Rethinking War and Politics with Schmitt, Arendt and Foucault. Philosophy and Social Criticism 37 (7):775-793.
    The notion of biopolitical sovereignty and the theory of the state of exception are perspectives derived from Carl Schmitt’s thought and Michel Foucault’s writings that have been popularized by critical political theorists like Giorgio Agamben and Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri of late. This article argues that these perspectives are not sufficient analytical points of departure for a critique of the contemporary politics of terror, violence and war marked by a growing global exploitation of bodies, tightened management of life, and (...)
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  25. Banu Bargu (2013). Human Shields. Contemporary Political Theory 12 (4):277.
    In recent decades, we have witnessed the emergence of new forms of warfare, which are characterized by asymmetry, irregularity and the cybernetization of weaponry. Waged from a distance, these wars have created the impression of decorporealization and low risk, at least for one of the contending parties. In contrast, the same asymmetric conflicts have been sites in which the human body has been utilized as a novel and lethal weapon. Although much scholarly attention has been paid to suicide attackers who (...)
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  26. Tarak Barkawi (2002). Organising Violence in World Politics: A Review Essay. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 5 (1):101-120.
  27. Christian Barry (2011). A Challenge to the Reigning Theory of the Just War. International Affairs 87 (2):457-466.
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  28. Saba Bazargan (forthcoming). Defensive Killing, by Frowe, Helen. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-4.
  29. Saba Bazargan (forthcoming). Non-Combatant Immunity and War-Profiteering. In Helen Frowe & Lazar Seth (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Ethics and War. Oxford University Press
    The principle of noncombatant immunity prohibits warring parties from intentionally targeting noncombatants. I explicate the moral version of this view and its criticisms by reductive individualists; they argue that certain civilians on the unjust side are morally liable to be lethally targeted to forestall substantial contributions to that war. I then argue that reductivists are mistaken in thinking that causally contributing to an unjust war is a necessary condition for moral liability. Certain noncontributing civilians—notably, war-profiteers—can be morally liable to be (...)
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  30. Saba Bazargan (2014). Defensive Wars and the Reprisal Dilemma. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 93 (3):583-601.
    I address a foundational problem with accounts of the morality of war that are derived from the Just War Tradition. Such accounts problematically focus on ‘the moment of crisis’: i.e. when a state is considering a resort to war. This is problematic because sometimes the state considering the resort to war is partly responsible for wrongly creating the conditions in which the resort to war becomes necessary. By ignoring this possibility, JWT effectively ignores, in its moral evaluation of wars, certain (...)
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  31. Saba Bazargan (2013). Peter A. French, War and Moral Dissonance. Journal of Moral Philosophy 10 (1):116-119.
  32. Saba Bazargan (2013). Complicitous Liability in War. Philosophical Studies 165 (1):177-195.
    Jeff McMahan has argued against the moral equivalence of combatants (MEC) by developing a liability-based account of killing in warfare. On this account, a combatant is morally liable to be killed only if doing so is an effective means of reducing or eliminating an unjust threat to which that combatant is contributing. Since combatants fighting for a just cause generally do not contribute to unjust threats, they are not morally liable to be killed; thus MEC is mistaken. The problem, however, (...)
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  33. Saba Bazargan (2013). Morally Heterogeneous Wars. Philosophia 41 (4):959-975.
    According to “epistemic-based contingent pacifism” a) there are virtually no wars which we know to be just, and b) it is morally impermissible to wage a war unless we know that the war is just. Thus it follows that there is no war which we are morally permitted to wage. The first claim (a) seems to follow from widespread disagreement among just war theorists over which wars, historically, have been just. I will argue, however, that a source of our inability (...)
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  34. Saba Bazargan (2011). The Permissibility of Aiding and Abetting Unjust Wars. Journal of Moral Philosophy 8 (4):513-529.
    Common sense suggests that if a war is unjust, then there is a strong moral reason not to contribute to it. I argue that this presumption is mistaken. It can be permissible to contribute to an unjust war because, in general, whether it is permissible to perform an act often depends on the alternatives available to the actor. The relevant alternatives available to a government waging a war differ systematically from the relevant alternatives available to individuals in a position to (...)
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  35. Endre Begby (2012). Collective Responsibility for Unjust Wars. POLITICS 32 (2):100-108.
    This article argues against Anna Stilz's recent attempt to solve the problem of citizens' collective responsibility in democratic states. I show that her solution could only apply to state actions that are (in legal terminology) unjustified but excusable. Stilz's marquee case – the 2003 invasion of Iraq – does not, I will argue, fit this bill; nor, in all likelihood, does any other case in recorded history. Thus, this article concludes, we may allow that Stilz's argument offers a theoretically cogent (...)
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  36. Daniel M. Bell Jr (1997). The Violence of Love: Latin American Liberationists in Defense of the Tradition of Revolutionary Violence.”. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 8 (1):17-36.
  37. Alex J. Bellamy (2004). Motives, Outcomes, Intent and the Legitimacy of Humanitarian Intervention. Journal of Military Ethics 3 (3):216-232.
    During the 1990s, international society increasingly recognised that states who abuse their citizens in the most egregious ways ought to lose their sovereign inviolability and be subject to humanitarian intervention. The emergence of this norm has given renewed significance to the debate concerning what it is about humanitarian intervention that makes it legitimate. The most popular view is that it is humanitarian motivations that legitimise intervention. Others insist that humanitarian outcomes are more important that an actor's motivations, pointing for instance (...)
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  38. Raymond A. Belliotti (1995). Are All Modern Wars Morally Wrong? Journal of Social Philosophy 26 (2):17-31.
  39. Yitzhak Benbaji (2010). Dehumanization, Lesser Evil and the Supreme Emergency Exemption. Diametros 23:5-21.
    Many believe that if the indiscriminate bombings of German cities at the beginning of World War II were necessary for preventing unlimited spread of Nazism, then the bombings were justified. For, the outcome, in which innocent Germans living in Nazi Germany are killed, was not as bad as the outcome in which the Nazis inflict ethnic cleansing and enslavement on a massive scale. Recently, however, Daniel Statman has advanced a powerful case against this type of justification. I aim in this (...)
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  40. Bobby Benedicto (2013). Reimagining the Intervention Narrative: Complicity, Globalization, and Humanitarian Discourse. Budhi: A Journal of Ideas and Culture 9 (1):105-117.
  41. Debra B. Bergoffen (2008). The Just War Tradition: Translating the Ethics of Human Dignity Into Political Practices. Hypatia 23 (2):pp. 72-94.
    This essay argues that the ambiguities of the just war tradition, sifted through a feminist critique, provides the best framework currently available for translating the ethical entitlement to human dignity into concrete feminist political practices. It offers a gendered critique of war that pursues the just war distinction between legitimate and illegitimate targets of wartime violence and provides a gendered analysis of the peace which the just war tradition obliges us to preserve and pursue.
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  42. Adam J. Berinsky, Assuming the Costs of War: Events, Elites, and American Public Support for Military Conflict.
    Many political scientists and policymakers argue that unmediated events - the successes and failures on the battlefield - determine whether the mass public will support military excursions. The public supports war, the story goes, if the benefits of action outweigh the costs of conflict. Other scholars contend that the balance of elite discourse influences public support for war. I draw upon survey evidence from World War II and the current war in Iraq to come to a common conclusion regarding public (...)
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  43. Alyssa R. Bernstein (2007). Kant on Rights and Coercion in International Law: Implications for Humanitarian Military Intervention. Philosophy 38 (2):237.
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  44. Geoffrey Best (1982). International Humanitarian Law. In Geoffrey L. Goodwin (ed.), Ethics and Nuclear Deterrence. St. Martin's Press
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  45. Ian Birchall (1999). On Humanitarian Bombing. Radical Philosophy 97.
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  46. Robin Blackburn (2002). The Imperial Presidency, the War on Terrorism, and the Revolutions of Modernity. Constellations 9 (1):3-33.
    It is inherent in the concept of a terrorist act that it aims at an effect very much larger than the direct physical destruction it causes. Proponents of what used to be called the 'propaganda of the deed' also believed that in the illuminating glare of terror the vulnerability of a corrupt ...
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  47. Iason P. Blahuta (2013). Of Noncombatants in Iust War Theory and Terrorism1. In Fritz Allhoff, Nicholas Evans & Adam Henschke (eds.), Routledge Handbook of Ethics and War: Just War Theory in the 21st Century. Routledge 253.
  48. Jacob Blair (2008). Tensions in a Certain Conception of Just War as Law Enforcement. Res Publica 14 (4):303-311.
    Many just war theorists (call them traditionalists) claim that just as people have a right to personal self-defense, so nations have a right to national-defense against an aggressive military invasion. David Rodin claims that the traditionalist is unable to justify most defensive wars against aggression. For most aggressive states only commit conditional aggression in that they threaten to kill or maim the citizens of the nation they are invading only if those citizens resist the occupation. Most wars, then, claimed to (...)
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  49. Luc Boltanski (2005). The Legitimacy of Humanitarian Actions and Their Media Representation: The Case of France. Ethical Perspectives 7 (1):3-16.
    The question of humanitarian action appeared in France in the public arena at the beginning of the 1990s, almost twenty years after the creation of `Médecins sans frontières' by Bernard Kouchner and Xavier Emmanuelli. The humanitarian debate in France developed in a political context marked by two essential features: on the one hand, the bureaucratization of humanitarian actions with its own secretary of state, an office occupied by Bernard Kouchner between 1988 and 1993 and, on the other hand, the war (...)
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  50. Joseph Boyle (2006). Traditional Just War Theory and Humanitarian Intervention. In Terry Nardin & Melissa Williams (eds.), Humanitarian Intervention. New York University Press 31--38.
1 — 50 / 390