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  1. Pamela Sue Anderson (ed.) (2010). New Topics in Feminist Philosophy of Religion: Resistance, Religion and Ethical-Political Relations.
  2. Judith Andre (2008). Burdened Virtues Virtue Ethics for Liberatory Struggles (Review). Hypatia 23 (2):pp. 193-196.
  3. Marian Barnes (2011). Abandoning Care? A Critical Perspective on Personalisation From an Ethic of Care. Ethics and Social Welfare 5 (2):153-167.
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  4. Macalester Bell (2006). Review of Lisa Tessman, Burdened Virtues: Virtue Ethics for Liberatory Struggles. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (6).
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  5. Patricia Benner (1997). A Dialogue Between Virtue Ethics and Care Ethics. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 18 (1-2).
    A dialogue between virtue and care ethics is formed as a step towards meeting Pellegrino's challenge to create a more comprehensive moral philosophy. It is also a dialogue between nursing and medicine since each practice draws on the Greek Virtue Tradition and the Judeo-Christian Tradition of care differently. In the Greek Virtue Tradition, the point of scrutiny lies in the inner character of the actor, whereas in the Judeo-Christian Tradition the focus is relational, i.e. how virtues are lived out in (...)
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  6. Sandrine Berges (2015). A Feminist Perspective on Virtue Ethics. Palgrave Macmillan.
    The writings of women philosophers have often been neglected in the discipline of virtue ethics. In this historical survey of feminist virtue ethics, Sandrine Berges redresses the balance by focusing on key writings of important women philosophers, including Perictione, Heloise, Christine de Pizan, Mary Wollstonecraft and Sophie de Grouchy. A Feminist Perspective on Virtue Ethics first applies the findings of its historical survey to questions on the ethics of care, gender and the public life, and global justice. In what follows, (...)
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  7. Charles Birch (1993). Regaining Compassion for Humanity and Nature. Chalice Press.
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  8. Peta Bowden (2006). Embodied Care: Jane Addams, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, and Feminist Ethics (Review). Hypatia 21 (3):210-214.
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  9. Peta Bowden (1997). Caring: Gender-Sensitive Ethics. Routledge.
    Caring extends and challenges recent debates over feminist ethics by taking issue with accounts of the ethics of care which try to pin down the "principles" of caring, rather than understanding the practice of caring. It explores four main caring practices: mothering, friendship, nursing and citizenship. Bowden's consideration of the differences and similarities in these working practices reveals the complexity of the ethics of caring.
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  10. Peta Bowden (1993). Theoretical Care: Feminism, Theory and Ethics. Critical Review 33:129-47.
  11. Tula Brannelly, Amohia Boulton & Allie te Hiini (2013). A Relationship Between the Ethics of Care and Māori Worldview—The Place of Relationality and Care in Maori Mental Health Service Provision. Ethics and Social Welfare (4):1-13.
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  12. Sara Brotto (2013). Etica Della Cura: Una Introduzione. Orthotes.
    Possiamo intenderci, quando parliamo di etica della cura?
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  13. Samuel A. Butler (2012). A Fourth Subject Position of Care. Hypatia 27 (2):390-406.
    Analyses of care work typically speak of three necessary roles of care: the care worker, the care recipient, and an economic provider who makes care materially possible. This model provides no place for addressing the difficult political questions care poses for liberal representative democracy. I propose to fill this space with a new caring role to connect the care unit to the political sphere, as the economic provider connects the care unit to the economic sphere. I call this role that (...)
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  14. Claudia Card (1990). Review: Caring and Evil. [REVIEW] Hypatia 5 (1):101 - 108.
    Nel Noddings, in Caring: A Feminine Approach to Ethics and Moral Education (1984), presents and develops an ethic of care as an alternative to an ethic that treats justice as a basic concept. I argue that this care ethic is unable to give an adequate account of ethical relationships between strangers and that it is also in danger of valorizing relationships in which carers are seriously abused.
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  15. Rutger Claassen (2011). The Commodification of Care. Hypatia 26 (1):43-64.
    This paper discusses the question whether care work for dependent persons (children, the elderly, and disabled persons) may be entrusted to the market; that is, whether and to what extent there is a normative justification for the “commodification of care.” It first proposes a capability theory for care that raises two relevant demands: a basic capability for receiving care and a capability for giving care. Next it discusses and rejects two objections that aim to show that market-based care undermines the (...)
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  16. Grace Clement (1996). Care, Autonomy, and Justice: Feminism and the Ethic of Care. Westview Press.
    Newcomers and more experienced feminist theorists will welcome this even-handed survey of the care/justice debate within feminist ethics. Grace Clement clarifies the key terms, examines the arguments and assumptions of all sides to the debate, and explores the broader implications for both practical and applied ethics. Readers will appreciate her generous treatment of the feminine, feminist, and justice-based perspectives that have dominated the debate.Clement also goes well beyond description and criticism, advancing the discussion through the incorporation of a broad range (...)
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  17. Mark Coeckelbergh (2007). Who Needs Empathy? A Response to Goldie's Arguments Against Empathy and Suggestions for an Account of Mutual Perspective-Shifting in Contexts of Help and Care. Ethics and Education 2 (1):61-72.
    According to an influential view, empathy has, and should have, a role in ethics, but it is by no means clear what is meant by 'empathy', and why exactly it is supposed to be morally good. Recently, Peter Goldie has challenged that view. He shows how problematic empathy is, and argues that taking an external perspective is morally superior: we should focus on the other, rather than ourselves. But this argument is misguided in several ways. If we consider conversation, there (...)
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  18. Patricia Hill Collins (1991). Black Women and Motherhood. In Virginia Held (ed.), Justice and Care.
  19. Rosie Cox (2010). Some Problems and Possibilities of Caring. Ethics, Policy and Environment 13 (2):113-130.
    . Some problems and possibilities of caring. Ethics, Place & Environment: Vol. 13, The Ethics of Care, pp. 113-130. doi: 10.1080/13668791003778800.
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  20. Deane Curtin (1991). Toward an Ecological Ethic of Care. Hypatia 6 (1):60 - 74.
    This paper argues that the language of rights cannot express distinctively ecofeminist insights into the treatment of nonhuman animals and the environment. An alternative is proposed in the form of a politicized ecological ethic of care which can express ecofeminist insights. The paper concludes with consideration of an ecofeminist moral issue: how we choose to understand ourselves morally in relation to what we are willing to count as food. "Contextual moral vegetarianism" represents a response to a politicized ecological ethic of (...)
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  21. Pamela Cushing & Tanya Lewis (2002). Negotiating Mutuality and Agency in Care-Giving Relationships with Women with Intellectual Disabilities. Hypatia 17 (3):173-193.
    : This article is an ethnographic analysis of the mutuality that is possible in relationships between caregivers and women with intellectual disabilities who live together in L'Arche homes. Creating mutuality through which both parties grow and exercise agency requires that caregivers learn to negotiate delicate power relations connected to the physics of care and to reframe dominant stereotypes of disability. This helps them to support the women with intellectual disabilities to name and achieve their desires.
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  22. Vrinda Dalmiya (2002). Why Should a Knower Care? Hypatia 17 (1):34--52.
    This paper argues that the concept of care is significant not only for ethics, but for epistemology as well. After elucidating caring as a five-step dyadic relation, I go on to show its epistemic significance within the general framework of virtue epistemology as developed by Ernest Sosa, Alvin Goldman, and Linda Zagzebski. The notions of "care-knowing" and "care-based epistemology" emerge from construing caring (respectively) as a reliabilist and responsibilist virtue.
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  23. Colin Danby (2004). Lupita's Dress: Care in Time. Hypatia 19 (4):23-48.
    : Carol Gilligan's temporally embedded caring subjects reason in terms of relationships with and forward-looking responsibilities to others, and consider how their decisions will shape future ties. Subsequent work in philosophy and economics has had difficulty developing these aspects because of an underlying social ontology that excludes them. This paper draws on a heterodox tradition, post-Keynesianism, to develop an alternative social ontology and an analysis of material life that takes time fully into account.
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  24. Victoria Davion (1993). Autonomy, Integrity, and Care. Social Theory and Practice 19 (2):161-182.
  25. Victoria Davion (1990). Pacifism and Care. Hypatia 5 (1):90 - 100.
    I argue there is no pacifist commitment implied by the practice of mothering, contrary to what Ruddick suggests. Using violence in certain situations is consistent with the goals of this practice. Furthermore, I use Ruddick's valuable analysis of the care for particular individuals involved in this practice to show why pacifism may be incompatible with caring passionately for individuals. If giving up passionate attachments to individuals is necessary for pacifist commitment as Ghandi claims, then the price is too high.
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  26. Monique Deveaux (1995). Shifting Paradigms: Theorizing Care and Justice in Political Theory. Hypatia 10 (2):115 - 119.
    The following is an introduction to a roundtable panel of the American Political Science Association meeting (Normative Political Theory Division) held September 2, 1994, in New York City. I set out some main themes in the "care/justice debate," and suggest that the impasse between care proponents and liberal, neo-Kantian thinkers is perpetuated by caricatured construals of these theories; salient differences come into relief by addressing the ethical and political applications of these moral perspectives.
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  27. Josephine Donovan (1996). Attention to Suffering: A Feminist Caring Ethic for the Treatment of Animals. Journal of Social Philosophy 27 (1):81-102.
  28. Speranta Dumitru (2015). Existe-t-il une féminisation de la migration internationale ?‪ Féminisation de la migration qualifiée et invisibilité des diplômes. Hommes Et Migrations 1311 (3):31-41.
    La « féminisation de la migration internationale » constitue la nouvelle formule magique de nombreuses études migratoires. Or, depuis un demi-siècle, la part des femmes dans la migration internationale n’a pas vraiment augmenté. En revanche, les femmes représentent aujourd’hui plus de la moitié des migrants diplômés de l’enseignement supérieur dans les pays de l’OCDE. Pourtant, cette féminisation de la migration qualifiée est moins souvent discutée. Comme si les diplômes des femmes migrantes devaient rester aussi invisibles dans la recherche que sur (...)
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  29. Daniel Engster (2006). Care Ethics and Animal Welfare. Journal of Social Philosophy 37 (4):521–536.
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  30. Daniel Engster (2005). Rethinking Care Theory: The Practice of Caring and the Obligation to Care. Hypatia 20 (3):50-74.
    : Care theorists have made significant gains over the past twenty-five years in establishing caring as a viable moral and political concept. Nonetheless, the concept of caring remains underdeveloped as a basis for a moral and political philosophy, and there is no fully developed account of our moral obligation to care. This article advances thinking about caring by developing a definition of caring and a theory of obligation to care sufficient to ground a general moral and (...)
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  31. Ann Ferguson (2014). Feminist Love Politics: Romance, Care, and Solidarity. In Love--A Question for Feminism in the Twenty-First Century.
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  32. Chris Frakes (2010). When Strangers Call: A Consideration of Care, Justice, and Compassion. Hypatia 25 (1):79 - 99.
    How ought we to respond to strangers in imminent need? Many people suggest that we need justice to temper the partiality of care. In this paper 1 argue that neither care nor justice adequately motivates attention to the suffering of strangers. Rather, a different virtue, compassion grounded in equanimity, is required. I demonstrate that the virtue of compassion alhws the agent to sustain her engagement with suffering strangers without sacrificing her own flourishing.
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  33. Ellen Freeberg (2004). The Subject of Care: Feminist Perspectives on Dependency. Contemporary Political Theory 3 (3):358.
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  34. Sara T. Fry (1989). The Role of Caring in a Theory of Nursing Ethics. Hypatia 4 (2):88 - 103.
    The development of nursing ethics as a field of inquiry has largely relied on theories of medical ethics that use autonomy, beneficence, and/or justice as foundational ethical principles. Such theories espouse a masculine approach to moral decision-making and ethical analysis. This paper challenges the presumption of medical ethics and its associated system of moral justification as an appropriate model for nursing ethics. It argues that the value foundations of nursing ethics are located within the existential phenomenon of human caring within (...)
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  35. Marie Garrau (2009). Le care entre dépendance et domination : l’interêt de la théorie néorépublicaine pour penser une « caring society ». Les Ateliers de l'Éthique / the Ethics Forum 4 (2):25-42.
    L’éthique du care est confrontée à un problème qui a des allures de paradoxe : bien que sa politisation paraisse nécessaire, l’éthique du care ne semble pas pouvoir trouver en elle-même les ressources suffisantes à la formulation d’une théorie politique compréhensive. Il ne semble pas exister de théorie politique du care à part entière. Cet article examine la fécondité d’un rapprochement entre éthique du care et théorie néorépublicaine de la non-domination. Le résultat, non négligeable, serait de garantir des formes importantes (...)
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  36. Anca Gheaus (2010). The Heart of Justice: Care Ethics and Political Theory, by Daniel Engster. [REVIEW] European Journal of Philosophy 18 (4):619-623.
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  37. Anca Gheaus (2010). Is Unconditional Forgiveness Ever Good? In Pamela Sue Anderson (ed.), New Topics in Feminist Philosophy of Religion: Resistance, Religion and Ethical-Political Relations.
    Forgiveness is a compelling Christian ideal. By contrast, to many philosophers it is not clear that forgiveness should be endorsed as a moral requirement; some argue that unconditional forgiveness is morally wrong. Those who are required to exercise forgiveness can feel that their own dignity and moral worthiness is diminished by such requirement if insignificant recognition was given to the harms they suffered as victims. This is particularly significant when thinking about women’s lives. Forgiveness and justice occasion particularly painful quandaries (...)
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  38. Anca Gheaus (2009). How Much of What Matters Can We Redistribute? Love, Justice, and Luck. Hypatia 24 (4):68-90.
    By meeting needs for individualized love and relatedness, the care we receive deeply shapes our social and economic chances and therefore represents a form of luck. Hence, distributive justice requires a fair distribution of care in society. I look at different ways of ensuring this and argue that full redistribution of care is beyond our reach. I conclude that a strong individual morality informed by an ethics of care is a necessary complement of well-designed institutions.
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  39. Anca Gheaus (2009). The Challenge of Care to Idealizing Theories of Distributive Justice. In Lisa Tessman (ed.), Feminist Ethics and Social and Political Philosophy: Theorizing the Non-Ideal. Springer 105--119.
    The ideal of distributive justice as a means of ensuring fair distribution of social opportunities is a cornerstone of contemporary feminist theory. Feminists from various disciplines have developed arguments to support the redistribution of the work of care through institutional mechanisms. I discuss the limits of such distribution under the conditions of theories that do not idealize human agents as independent beings. People’s reliance on care, understood as a response to needs, is pervasive and infuses almost all human interaction. I (...)
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  40. Anca Gheaus (2005). Review of Eva Feder Kittay Love's Labor. [REVIEW] The Romanian Journal of Society and Politics 5 (1):173-7.
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  41. Carol Gilligan (2014). Moral Injury and the Ethic of Care: Reframing the Conversation About Differences. Journal of Social Philosophy 45 (1):89-106.
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  42. Carol Gilligan (1995). Hearing the Difference: Theorizing Connection. Hypatia 10 (2):120 - 127.
    Hearing the difference between a patriarchal voice and a relational voice defines a paradigm shift: a change in the conception of the human world. Theorizing connection as primary and fundamental in human life leads to a new psychology, which shifts the grounds for philosophy and political theory. A crucial distinction is made between a feminine ethic of care and a feminist ethic of care. Voice, relationship, resistance, and women become central rather than peripheral in this reframing of the human world.
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  43. Roger S. Gottlieb (2002). The Tasks of Embodied Love: Moral Problems in Caring for Children with Disabilities. Hypatia 17 (3):225 - 236.
    Neither secular moral theory nor religious ethics have had much place for persons in need of constant physical help and cognitive support, nor for those who provide care for them. Writing as the father of a fourteen-year-old daughter with multiple disabilities, I will explore some of moral issues that arise here, both from the point of view of the disabled child and from that of the child's caretaker(s).
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  44. Lorenzo Greco (ed.) (2012). Hume e l’etica contemporanea, Section “Nodi” of Iride 25(67) (2012): 537-615. Il Mulino.
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  45. Lorenzo Greco (2011). Michael Slote, Moral Sentimentalism (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010). [REVIEW] Rivista di Filosofia 102 (1):163-65.
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  46. Lorenzo Greco (2010). Harry G. Frankfurt, Catturati dall'amore (Reggio Emilia: Diabasis, 2009). [REVIEW] Rivista di Filosofia 101 (2):298-99.
  47. Lorenzo Greco (2008). Joan C. Tronto, Confini morali. Un argomento politico per l'etica della cura. [REVIEW] la Cultura 46 (3):426-28.
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  48. Raja Halwani (2003). Care Ethics and Virtue Ethics. Hypatia 18 (3):161-192.
    : The paper argues that care ethics should be subsumed under virtue ethics by construing care as an important virtue. Doing so allows us to achieve two desirable goals. First, we preserve what is important about care ethics (for example, its insistence on particularity, partiality, emotional engagement, and the importance of care to our moral lives). Second, we avoid two important objections to care ethics, namely, that it neglects justice, and that it contains no mechanism by which care can be (...)
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  49. Maurice Hamington (2009). Liberté, Égalité, Sororité: How Care Ethics Informs Social Justice. Social Philosophy Today 25:123-135.
    When theorists first struggled to define and distinguish care ethics from other moral theories, many chose to sharply differentiate it from justice. Now that care ethics has matured as a field, theorists no longer characterize care and justice as purely oppositional, giving rise to new questions about how the two moral concepts relate to one another. This article suggests that care ethics contributes to a richer social morality than traditional justice approaches in at least four areas: metaphysics, epistemology, psychology, and (...)
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  50. Maurice Hamington (2009). The Ethics of Care and Empathy. By Michael Slote. Hypatia 24 (1):196-199.
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