Related categories
Siblings:
32 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
  1. Avinash Arya & Huey-Lian Sun (2004). Stock Option Repricing: Heads I Win, Tails You Lose. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 50 (4):297-312.
    Recent scandals at Enron, WorldCom and Global Crossing have put the ethical spotlight on corporate malfeasance as never before. However, these are the situations in which management knew that they made the wrong choice. As professor Joseph Badaracco of Harvard Business School points out, the real ethical dilemmas arise when people must choose between right and right — where both choices can be justified, yet one must be chosen over the other. Whether or not to reprice stock options represents one (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Allan S. Ashley & Simon S. M. Yang (2004). Executive Compensation and Earnings Persistence. Journal of Business Ethics 50 (4):369-382.
    Governing boards utilize executive compensation contracts in an attempt to align executive actions with corporate goals. The objective is to ensure that executive performance provides value to the organization in terms of successful outcomes. A key performance criteria typically specified in CEO compensation contracts is earnings targets. However, using earnings as a performance evaluation may be problematic because some firms exhibit robust and sustained earnings over time (high earnings persistence), and other firms, such as high growth oriented firms, exhibit weak (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Ruth Bender & Lance Moir (2006). Does 'Best Practice' in Setting Executive Pay in the UK Encourage 'Good' Behaviour? Journal of Business Ethics 67 (1):75 - 91.
    We examine how UK listed companies set executive pay, reviewing the implications of following best practice in corporate governance and examining how this can conflict with what shareholders and other stakeholders might perceive as good behaviour. We do this by considering current governance regulation in the light of interviews with protagonists in the debate, setting out the dilemmas faced by remuneration-setters, and showing how the processes they follow can lead to ethical conflicts.Current ‘best’ practice governing executive pay includes the use (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. John R. Boatright (2010). Executive Compensation : Unjust or Just Right? In George G. Brenkert & Tom L. Beauchamp (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Business Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Virginia Bodolica, Michel Magnan & Martin Spraggon (2007). Merger and Acquisition Related Determinants of Executive Compensation Arrangements' Adoption. International Journal of Business Governance and Ethics 3 (4):407-429.
    Previous research has investigated the links between Mergers and Acquisitions (M&As) and the monetary magnitude of executive compensation, but failed to inquire how the adoption of specific attributes of compensation contacts relates to M&A activities. We address this gap in the literature by examining the impacts of some M&A characteristics and acquirers' features on the adoption of executive compensation protection provisions and new Long-Term Incentive Plans (LTIPs). The study adopts a longitudinal design before after M&A deals for 80 Canadian acquiring (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. James A. Brander (2006). The Effect of Ethical Fund Portfolio Inclusion on Executive Compensation. Journal of Business Ethics 69 (4):317 - 329.
    This paper divides firms in the Standard and Poor’s 500 (S&P 500) into two groups based on inclusion in or exclusion from the Domini Social Index (DSI). Inclusion in the DSI is interpreted as a positive indicator of ethical status. Using data for the 1992–2003 period, I provide evidence that chief executive officer (CEO) compensation, other executive compensation, and director compensation tend to be lower in DSI firms than in other firms in the S&P 500. This applies to the unconditional (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Ye Cai, Hoje Jo & Carrie Pan (2011). Vice or Virtue? The Impact of Corporate Social Responsibility on Executive Compensation. Journal of Business Ethics 104 (2):159-173.
    We empirically examine the impact of corporate social responsibility (CSR) on CEO compensation using a large sample of the US firms from 1996 to 2010. We develop and test two hypotheses, the overinvestment hypothesis based on agency theory and the conflict–resolution hypothesis based on stakeholder theory. We find that the lag of CSR adversely affects both total compensation and cash compensation, after controlling for various firm and board characteristics. Our estimates show that an interquartile increase in CSR is followed by (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Linda L. Carr & Moosa Valinezhad (1994). The Role of Ethics in Executive Compensation: Toward a Contractarian Interpretation of the Neoclassical Theory of Managerial Renumeration. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 13 (2):81 - 93.
    The topic of Chief Executive Officer (CEO) compensation has been a focus of interest for many years. The purpose of this article is to explore the ethical dimensions of various generally accepted theories of CEO renumeration. We argue that a contractarian approach, based on the Kantian ethical framework, can be used to augment the existing contingent pay models.While the neoclassical economic model of the firm views the maximization of the shareholders'' wealth as the sole responsibility of top management, a contractarian (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Marjorie Chan (2009). Editorial: “Executive Compensation”. Open Ethics Journal 3 (2):40-41.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Marjorie Chan (2009). Hot Topic: “Executive Compensation”. Open Ethics Journal 3 (1):40-90.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Marjorie Chan (2009). How to Rein in Executive Compensation? Open Ethics Journal 3 (2):81-90.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Craig Cox & Sally Power (1991). Executive Pay: How Much Is Too Much? Business Ethics; The Magazine of Corporate Responsibility 5 (5):18-24.
    What's wrong with high executive pay? Beyond envy, is some issue of justice or fairness at stake? And what can anyone do about it? (A lot, as it turns out.).
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. John Dobson (2011). A Moral and Economic Defense of Executive Compensation. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 30 (1-2):59-70.
    A great deal has been written in recent years about the justification, if any, for the current levels of executive compensation. The folk consensus is that the current levels of executive compensation are unjustifiably high from both a moral and an economic perspective. In the case of the former, the compensation level is unfair and unjust. And in the case of the latter, the compensation level is not in the broader interests of other stakeholders or of firm-value maximization.In this paper (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Sydney Finkelstein (2009). Why is Industry Related to CEO Compensation?: A Managerial Discretion Explanation. Open Ethics Journal 3 (2):42-56.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Julian Friedland (2010). A Fair Wage? Capping Executive Compensation. Journal of Business Ethics Education 7:129-139.
    This case study highlights some of the latest research on setting executive compensation at ethical levels. The board of directors of Spade’s, a mid-size U.S. hardware chain, considers altering the pay package of its incoming CEO to best align his interests with those of shareholders and stakeholders. Students are invited to consider various options on current trends, which seem attractive and convincing on the surface, but might present certain risks over the longer term. Five compensation components are analyzed, namely, salary (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Jared D. Harris (2009). What's Wrong with Executive Compensation? Journal of Business Ethics 85 (1):147 - 156.
    I broadly explore the question by examining several common criticisms of CEO pay through both philosophical and empirical lenses. While some criticisms appear to be unfounded, the analysis shows not only that current compensation practices are problematic both from the standpoint of distributive justice and fairness, but also that incentive pay ultimately exacerbates the very agency problem it is purported to solve.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Maria Joutsenvirta (2013). Executive Pay and Legitimacy: Changing Discursive Battles Over the Morality of Excessive Manager Compensation. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 116 (3):459-477.
    How is the (il)legitimacy of manager compensation constructed in social interaction? This study investigated discursive processes through which heavily contested executive pay schemes of the Finnish energy giant Fortum were constructed as (il)legitimate in public during 2005–2009. The critical discursive analysis of media texts identified five legitimation strategies through which politicians, journalists, and other social actors contested these schemes and, at the same time, constructed subject positions for managers, politicians, and citizens. The comparison of two debate periods surrounding the 2007–2008 (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Kiridaran Kanagaretnam, Gerald J. Lobo & Emad Mohammad (2009). Are Stock Options Grants to Ceos of Stagnant Firms Fair and Justified? Journal of Business Ethics 90 (1):137 - 155.
    Prior research has examined several ethical questions related to executive compensation. The issues that have received most attention are whether executives' pay is fair and justified by performance. Since more recent studies show that stock options grants constitute the single largest component in executive compensation, we examine the relations of these grants to economic determinants and corporate governance for firms in the stagnant stage of their lifecycle. We find that, on average, stock options grants comprise a significant portion of annual (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Robert Kolb & Jeffrey Moriarty (2011). Dialogue - CEO Compensation. Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (4):679-691.
    Must CEOs Be Saints? Contra Moriarty on CEO Abstemiousness by Robert KolbIn this journal, Jeffrey Moriarty argued that CEOs must refuse to accept compensation above the minimum compensation that will induce them to accept and per­form their jobs. Acting otherwise, he maintains, violates the CEO’s fiduciary duty, even for a CEO new to the firm. I argue that Moriarty’s conclusion rests on a failure to adequately distinguish when a person acts as a fiduciary from when she acts on her own (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Dale Kurschner (1995). Kodak's Executive Pay Plan. Business Ethics 9 (5):47-47.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Lois Schafer Mahoney & Linda Thorn (2006). An Examination of the Structure of Executive Compensation and Corporate Social Responsibility: A Canadian Investigation. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 69 (2):149 - 162.
    We explore the extent to which Boards use executive compensation to incite firms to act in accordance with social and environmental objectives (e.g., Johnson, R. and D. Greening: 1999, Academy of Management Journal 42(5), 564-578; Kane, E. J.: 2002, Journal of Banking and Finance 26, 1919-1933.). We examine the association between executive compensation and corporate social responsibility (CSR) for 77 Canadian firms using three key components of executives' compensation structure: salary, bonus, and stock options. Similar to prior research (McGuire, J., (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Ella Mae Matsumura & Jae Yong Shin (2005). Corporate Governance Reform and CEO Compensation: Intended and Unintended Consequences. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 62 (2):101 - 113.
    Recent scandals allegedly linked to CEO compensation have brought executive compensation and perquisites to the forefront of debate about constraining executive compensation and reforming the associated corporate governance structure. We briefly describe the structure of executive compensation, and the agency theory framework that has commonly been used to conceptualize executives acting on behalf of shareholders. We detail some criticisms of executive compensation and associated ethical issues, and then discuss what previous research suggests are likely intended and unintended consequences of some (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. John J. McCall (2004). Assessing American Executive Compensation: A Cautionary Tale for Europeans. Business Ethics 13 (4):243-254.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Jeffrey Moriarty (2012). Justice in Compensation: A Defense. Business Ethics 21 (1):64-76.
    Business ethicists have written much about ethical issues in employment. Except for a handful of articles on the very high pay of chief executive officers and the very low pay of workers in overseas sweatshops, however, little has been written about the ethics of compensation. This is prima facie strange. Workers care about their pay, and they think about it in normative terms. This article's purpose is to consider whether business ethicists' neglect of the normative aspects of compensation is justified. (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Jeffrey Moriarty (2005). Do CEOs Get Paid Too Much? Business Ethics Quarterly 15 (2):257-281.
    In 2003, CEOs of the 365 largest U.S. corporations were paid on average $8 million, 301 times as much as factory workers. This paper asks whether CEOs get paid too much. Appealing to widely recognized moral values, I distinguish three views of justice in wages: the agreement view, the desert view, and the utility view. I argue that, no matter which view is correct, CEOs get paid too much. I conclude by offering two ways CEO pay might be reduced.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Donald Nichols & Chandra Subramaniam (2001). Executive Compensation: Excessive or Equitable? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 29 (4):339 - 351.
    The eighties and nineties have seen much debate about CEO compensation. Critics of CEO compensation support their contention of excessive and inequitable CEO pay based on a number of factors and premises. This paper examines the validity of these arguments. We show why many of these arguments fail to persuade, in part, because they attempt to determine propriety of CEO pay without having a definitive standard for comparison. Arguments based on comparisons between CEO pay and the pay of other individuals (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Mel Perel (2003). An Ethical Perspective on CEO Compensation. Journal of Business Ethics 48 (4):381-391.
    The controversial issue of whether Chief Executive Officer (CEO) compensation is excessive or appropriate is examined in terms of two competing claims: that CEOs are overpaid for the value they provide to an enterprise, and that CEO compensation is inherently equitable. Various arguments and perspectives on both sides of the issue are assessed. Little evidence supports the claim that CEO performance justifies very high compensation. Further, the complex interactive alliance between boards of directors and CEOs compromises rational decision-making about CEO (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Waymond Rodgers & Susana Gago (2003). A Model Capturing Ethics and Executive Compensation. Journal of Business Ethics 48 (2):189-202.
    This article develops and applies a knowledge-based framework for understanding and interpreting executive compensation under the rubric of ethical consideration. This framework classifies six major ethical considerations that reflect issues in compensation design. We emphasize that these six ethical considerations are influenced by liberty and equality concepts. This framework helps to highlight areas where executive compensation has not been well spelled out.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Lawrence A. Vitulano & S. J. Hannafey (2009). Economic, Moral, and Motivational Criteria of Executive Compensation: Recent Developments. Open Ethics Journal 3 (2):67-70.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Bruce Walters, Tim Hardin & James Schick (1995). Top Executive Compensation: Equity or Excess? Implications for Regaining American Competitiveness. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 14 (3):227 - 234.
    The debate over compensation packages for top executives is discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on the decoupling of CEO pay and organizational performance. A contrast is drawn between firms that are owner-controlled and those that are manager-controlled. Owner-controlled firms tend to be more market-driven. In manager-controlled firms, however, ownership can become diluted to the point where decisions may not always be in the best interest of shareholders. The process of determining CEO compensation packages is examined, and special attention is given (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Paul G. Wilhelm (1993). Application of Distributive Justice Theory to the CEO Pay Problem: Recommendations for Reform. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 12 (6):469 - 482.
    An ethical analysis of chief executive officer (CEO) salaries can be approached via theory on distributive justice and an examination of some corporate codes of ethics. U.S. CEO salaries are compared with their Japanese and European counterparts, and factors behind the high U.S. CEO salaries are reviewed. The negative repercussions of high pay are discussed, including feelings of unfairness, declining morale and greater cynicism found in lower level employees. Reduced research and development budgets, and downsized organizations are related to the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Klaas Woldring (1995). The Ethics of Australian Executive Remuneration Packages. Journal of Business Ethics 14 (11):937 - 947.
    This article raises the issue of growing inequalities in remuneration in Australia at a time of severe economic recession. The salary packages of the CEOs and senior managers of large Australian companies have been increased substantially in recent years often in spite of poor performance of the companies. At the same time real wages have either stagnated or, according to some researchers, have fallen in the same period. In addition unemployment has risen to unprecedented high levels (above 11%).The ethics of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation