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  1. Natalie Abrams (1978). Active and Passive Euthanasia. Philosophy 53 (204):257 - 263.
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  2. Sami Alsolamy (2014). Islamic Views on Artificial Nutrition and Hydration in Terminally Ill Patients. Bioethics 28 (2):96-99.
    Withholding and withdrawing artificial nutrition and hydration from terminally ill patients poses many ethical challenges. The literature provides little information about the Islamic beliefs, attitudes, and laws related to these challenges. Artificial nutrition and hydration may be futile and reduce quality of life. They can also harm the terminally ill patient because of complications such as aspiration pneumonia, dyspnea, nausea, diarrhea, and hypervolemia. From the perspective of Islam, rules governing the care of terminally ill patients are derived from the principle (...)
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  3. Zac Alstin (2012). Volume 22 Issue 3 - 'Apres Moi Le Deluge'. Bioethics Research Notes 22 (3):42-.
    Alstin, Zac The increasing support that euthanasia is gathering in South Australia with a new euthanasia bill about to be passed is discussed. Some of the implicit and explicit challenges and pressures that the introduction of such a bill will pose are highlighted.
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  4. Zac Alstin (2010). Apres Moi Le Deluge. Bioethics Research Notes 22 (3):42.
    Alstin, Zac The increasing support that euthanasia is gathering in South Australia with a new euthanasia bill about to be passed is discussed. Some of the implicit and explicit challenges and pressures that the introduction of such a bill will pose are highlighted.
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  5. Zac Alstin (2010). The Inherent Instability of Euthanasia. Bioethics Research Notes 22 (2):15.
    Alstin, Zac Euthanasia, which is defined as the intentional killing of another human being, is compared with the established categories of killing in self-defence or as a foreseeable consequence of medical treatment.
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  6. A. T. Altschul (1990). Euthanasia: The Good Death. Journal of Medical Ethics 16 (4):218-218.
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  7. Kumar Amarasekara & Mirko Bagaric (2004). Moving From Voluntary Euthanasia to Non-Voluntary Euthanasia: Equality and Compassion. Ratio Juris 17 (3):398-423.
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  8. Floyd Angus & Robert Burakoff (2006). The Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy Tube : Medical and Ethical Issues in Placement. In Arthur L. Caplan, James J. McCartney & Dominic A. Sisti (eds.), The Case of Terri Schiavo: Ethics at the End of Life. Prometheus Books.
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  9. Francisco Javier Ansuátegui Roig (2009). Euthanasia, Philosophy, and the Law: A Jurist's View From Madrid. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 18 (03):262-.
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  10. Jacob M. Appel (2009). Neonatal Euthanasia: Why Require Parental Consent? [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (4):477-482.
    The Dutch rules governing neonatal euthanasia, known as the Groningen Protocol, require parental consent for severely disabled infants with poor prognoses to have their lives terminated. This paper questions whether parental consent should be dispositive in such cases, and argues that the potential suffering of the neonate or pediatric patient should be the decisive factor under such unfortunate circumstances.
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  11. A. J. V. D. Arend (1998). An Ethical Perspective on Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide in the Netherlands From a Nursing Point of View. Nursing Ethics 5 (4):307-318.
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  12. Joachim Asscher (2007). Killing and Letting Die: The Similarity Criterion. Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (3):271–282.
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  13. Elvio Baccarini, Questions of Life and Death.
    The research started with a definition of the general ethical background to be applied in bioethical discussions, particularly regarding aspects of morality that have to be enforced by the community. Only those moral beliefs that can be accepted by consensus in a free discussion can be enforced. It follows that the basic principle of a well ordered society is the equality (and possible upwards extension) of the basic liberties. Therefore, whenever it is possible to respect the principle of autonomy in (...)
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  14. Sarah Bachelard (2002). On Euthanasia: Blindspots in the Argument From Mercy. Journal of Applied Philosophy 19 (2):131–140.
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  15. Robert M. Baird & Stuart E. Rosenbaum (eds.) (1989). Euthanasia: The Moral Issues. Prometheus Books.
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  16. Y. Michael Barilan & Moshe Weintraub (2001). Pantagruelism: A Rabelaisian Inspiration for Understanding Poisoning, Euthanasia and Abortion in the Hippocratic Oath and in Contemporary Clinical Practice. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 22 (3):269-286.
    Contrary to the common view, this paper suggests that the Hippocratic oath does not directly refer to the controversial subjects of euthanasia and abortion. We interpret the oath in the context of establishing trust in medicine through departure from Pantagruelism. Pantagruelism is coined after Rabelais' classic novel Gargantua and Pantagruel. His satire about a wonder herb, Pantagruelion, is actually a sophisticated model of anti-medicine in which absence of independent moral values and of properly conducted research fashion a flagrant over-medicalization of (...)
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  17. Fr Robert Barry (1987). The Case Against Active Voluntary Euthanasia. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 15 (3):161-163.
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  18. Robert Laurence Barry (1989). Medical Ethics: Essays on Abortion and Euthanasia. P. Lang.
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  19. P. Bartmann (2003). Physician-Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: German Protestantism, Conscience, and the Limits of Purely Ethical Reflection. Christian Bioethics 9 (2-3):203-225.
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  20. L. Basta (2001). Life and Death on Your Own Terms. Prometheus Books.
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  21. M. P. Battin & T. J. Bole (1993). What If Euthanasia Were Legal? Introducing the Issue. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 18 (3):237-240.
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  22. M. Pabst Battin (2005). Ending Life: Ethics and the Way We Die. Oxford University Press.
    Margaret Pabst Battin has established a reputation as one of the top philosophers working in bioethics today. This work is a sequel to Battin's 1994 volume The Least Worst Death. The last ten years have seen fast-moving developments in end-of-life issues, from the legalization of physician-assisted suicide in Oregon and the Netherlands to furor over proposed restrictions of scheduled drugs used for causing death, and the development of "NuTech" methods of assistance in dying. Battin's new collection covers a remarkably wide (...)
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  23. Margaret Battin (2007). Right Question, But Not Quite the Right Answer: Whether There Is a Third Alternative in Choices About Euthanasia in Alzheimer's Disease. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (4):58-60.
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  24. Margaret Battin (1992). Voluntary Euthanasia and the Risks of Abuse: Can We Learn Anything From the Netherlands? Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 20 (1-2):133-143.
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  25. Carl B. Becker (1990). Buddhist Views of Suicide and Euthanasia. Philosophy East and West 40 (4):543-556.
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  26. A.-M. Begley (1998). Beneficent Voluntary Active Euthanasia: A Challenge to Professionals Caring for Terminally Ill Patients. Nursing Ethics 5 (4):294-306.
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  27. M. K. Bendiane, A.-D. Bouhnik, A. Galinier, R. Favre, Y. Obadia & P. Peretti-Watel (2009). French Hospital Nurses' Opinion About Euthanasia and Physician-Assisted Suicide: A National Phone Survey. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (4):238-244.
    Background: Hospital nurses are frequently the first care givers to receive a patient’s request for euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide (PAS). In France, there is no consensus over which medical practices should be considered euthanasia, and this lack of consensus blurred the debate about euthanasia and PAS legalisation. This study aimed to investigate French hospital nurses’ opinions towards both legalisations, including personal conceptions of euthanasia and working conditions and organisation. Methods: A phone survey conducted among a random national sample of 1502 (...)
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  28. M. Bendiane, A. Galinier, R. Favre, C. Ribiere, J.-M. Lapiana, Y. Obadia & P. Peretti-Watel (2007). French District Nurses' Opinions Towards Euthanasia, Involvement in End-of-Life Care and Nurse Patient Relationship: A National Phone Survey. Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (12):708-711.
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  29. Martin Benjamin (1995). Causation and Responsibility in Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 20 (1):431-441.
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  30. R. Bennett (2000). Drug Use in Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: Edited by Margaret P Battin and Arthur G Lipman, New York, Pharmaceutical Products Press, 1996, 360 Pages, US$36.00. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (3):222-a-223.
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  31. M. Berghs (2005). The Complexity of Nurses' Attitudes Toward Euthanasia: A Review of the Literature. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (8):441-446.
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  32. P. Berry (2000). Euthanasia--A Dialogue. Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (5):370-374.
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  33. Gilberto de Jesús Betancourt Betancourt (2011). Limitación del esfuerzo terapéutico versus eutanasia: una reflexión bioética. Humanidades Médicas 11 (2):259-273.
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  34. Nigel Biggar (2004). Aiming to Kill: The Ethics of Suicide and Euthanasia. Pilgrim Press.
    1. The traditional position and the pressures for change. The Western legal tradition -- The Christian ethical hinterland -- The exceptional value of human life -- The justification of taking human life -- Suicide -- Christian ethics, assisted suicide, and voluntary euthanasia -- The cultural pressures for change -- 2. The value of human life -- 3. The morality of acts of killing -- 4. Slippery slopes.
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  35. Hazel Biggs (2001). Euthanasia, Death with Dignity, and the Law. Hart Publishing.
    Machine generated contents note: Table of Cases xi -- Table of legislation xv -- Introduction: Medicine Men, Outlaws and Voluntary Euthanasia 1 -- 1. To Kill or not to Kill; is that the Euthanasia Question? 9 -- Introduction-Why Euthanasia? 9 -- Dead or alive? 16 -- Euthanasia as Homicide 25 -- Euthanasia as Death with Dignity 29 -- 2. Euthanasia and Clinically assisted Death: from Caring to Killing? 35 -- Introduction 35 -- The Indefinite Continuation of Palliative Treatment 38 -- (...)
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  36. J. P. Bishop (2006). Euthanasia, Efficiency, and the Historical Distinction Between Killing a Patient and Allowing a Patient to Die. Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (4):220.
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  37. J. P. Bishop (2006). Framing Euthanasia. Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (4):225-228.
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  38. Theo A. Boer (2007). Recurring Themes in the Debate About Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (3):527 - 555.
    During the past four decades, the Netherlands played a leading role in the debate about euthanasia and assisted suicide. Despite the claim that other countries would soon follow the Dutch legalization of euthanasia, only Belgium and the American state of Oregon did. In many countries, intense discussions took place. This article discusses some major contributions to the discussion about euthanasia and assisted suicide as written by Nigel Biggar (2004), Arthur J. Dyck (2002), Neil M. Gorsuch (2006), and John Keown (2002). (...)
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  39. Boris Böhm & Norbert Haase (eds.) (2007). Täterschaft, Strafverfolgung, Schuldentlastung: Ärztebiografien Zwischen Nationalsozialistischer Gewaltherrschaft Und Deutscher Nachkriegsgeschichte. Leipziger Universitätsverlag.
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  40. David Boonin (ed.) (2004). What's Wrong?: Applied Ethicists and Their Critics. Oxford University Press.
    What's Wrong?: Applied Ethicists and Their Critics is a thorough and engaging introduction to applied ethics that covers virtually all of the issues in the field. Featuring more than ninety-five articles, it addresses standard topics--such as abortion, euthanasia, capital punishment, world hunger, and animal rights--and also delves into cutting-edge areas like cloning, racial profiling, same-sex marriage, prostitution, and slave reparations. The volume includes seminal essays by prominent philosophers (Robert Nozick, James Rachels, Peter Singer, and Judith Jarvis Thomson) alongside work by (...)
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  41. David Boonin (2000). How to Argue Against Active Euthanasia. Journal of Applied Philosophy 17 (2):157–168.
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  42. Vernon J. Bourke (1980). Life and Death with Liberty and Justice: A Contribution to the Euthanasia Debate. By Germain Grisez and Joseph M. Boyle, Jr. [REVIEW] The Modern Schoolman 57 (3):259-261.
  43. K. M. Boyd (1994). Euthanasia and Other Medical Decisions Concerning the End of Life. Journal of Medical Ethics 20 (3):198-199.
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  44. Joseph Boyle (2004). Medical Ethics and Double Effect: The Case of Terminal Sedation. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 25 (1):51-60.
    The use of terminal sedation to control theintense discomfort of dying patients appearsboth to be an established practice inpalliative care and to run counter to the moraland legal norm that forbids health careprofessionals from intentionally killingpatients. This raises the worry that therequirements of established palliative care areincompatible with moral and legal opposition toeuthanasia. This paper explains how thedoctrine of double effect can be relied on todistinguish terminal sedation from euthanasia. The doctrine of double effect is rooted inCatholic moral casuistry, but (...)
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  45. Melvin J. Brandon (1992). Book Review:Suicide and Euthanasia: Historical and Contemporary Themes. Baruch A. Brody. [REVIEW] Ethics 102 (2):412-.
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  46. I. Brassington (2006). Killing People: What Kant Could Have Said About Suicide and Euthanasia but Did Not. Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (10):571-574.
    An agent who takes his own life acts in violation of the moral law, according to Kant; suicide, and, by extension, assisted suicide are therefore wrong. By a similar argument, and with a few important exceptions, killing is wrong; implicitly, then, voluntary euthanasia is also wrong. Kant's conclusions are uncompelling and his argument in these matters is undermined on considering other areas of his thought. Kant, in forbidding suicide and euthanasia, is conflating respect for persons and respect for people, and (...)
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  47. L. Brits, L. Human, L. Pieterse, P. Sonnekus & G. Joubert (2009). Opinions of Private Medical Practitioners in Bloemfontein, South Africa, Regarding Euthanasia of Terminally Ill Patients. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (3):180-182.
    The aim of this study was to determine the opinions of private medical practitioners in Bloemfontein, South Africa, regarding euthanasia of terminally ill patients. This descriptive study was performed amongst a simple random sample of 100 of 230 private medical practitioners in Bloemfontein. Information was obtained through anonymous self-administered questionnaires. Written informed consent was obtained. 68 of the doctors selected completed the questionnaire. Only three refused participation because they were opposed to euthanasia. Respondents were mainly male (74.2%), married (91.9%) and (...)
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  48. Dan W. Brock (1993). Life and Death: Philosophical Essays in Biomedical Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    How should modern medicine's dramatic new powers to sustain life be employed? How should limited resources be used to extend and improve the quality of life? In this collection, Dan Brock, a distinguished philosopher and bioethicist and co-author of Deciding for Others (Cambridge, 1989), explores the moral issues raised by new ideals of shared decision making between physicians and patients. The book develops an ethical framework for decisions about life-sustaining treatment and euthanasia, and examines how these life and death decisions (...)
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  49. Dan W. Brock (1992). Voluntary Active Euthanasia. Hastings Center Report 22 (2):10-22.
    This article references the following linked citations. If you are trying to access articles from an off-campus location, you may be required to first logon via your library web site to access JSTOR. Please visit your library's website or contact a librarian to learn about options for remote access to JSTOR.
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  50. Jonathan E. Brockopp (ed.) (2003). Islamic Ethics of Life: Abortion, War, and Euthanasia. University of South Carolina Press.
    o ne -taking -Life ana Oavmg .Life The Islamic Context Jonathan E. Brockopp The great ethicists of the western world, Augustine, Aquinas, Kant, and others, ...
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