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  1. Craig S. Abbott (1989). The Case of Debbie Revisited: A Literary Perspective. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 10 (2):99-106.
    The publication in theJournal of the American Medical Association of a narrative entitled “It's Over, Debbie,” in which a gynecology resident apparently performs euthanasia, has stirred considerable debate characterized by varying interpretations not only of the ethical issues involved but of the meaning of the text itself. Formal analysis reveals the narrative to be strikingly literary in its ambiguity, its foregrounding of its own textuality, and its dominant structure of repetition and reversal. The analysis points to features that account for (...)
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  2. Natalie Abrams (1978). Active and Passive Euthanasia. Philosophy 53 (204):257 - 263.
    This paper is divided into three sections. The first presents some examples of the killing/letting die distinction. The second draws a further distinction between what I call negative and positive cases of acting or refraining. Here I argue that the moral significance of the acting/refraining distinction is different for positive and for negative cases. In the third section I apply the above distinction to euthanasia, and argue that mercy killing should be regarded as analogous to positive rather than negative cases. (...)
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  3. P. Admiraal (1991). Is There a Place for Euthanasia. Bioethics News 10 (4):10-23.
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  4. Pieter Admiraal (1996). Euthanasia in The Netherlands. Free Inquiry 17.
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  5. Pieter Admiraal (1989). Justifiable Active Euthanasia in the Netherlands. In Robert M. Baird & Stuart E. Rosenbaum (eds.), Euthanasia: The Moral Issues. Prometheus Books 125--28.
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  6. Sami Alsolamy (2014). Islamic Views on Artificial Nutrition and Hydration in Terminally Ill Patients. Bioethics 28 (2):96-99.
    Withholding and withdrawing artificial nutrition and hydration from terminally ill patients poses many ethical challenges. The literature provides little information about the Islamic beliefs, attitudes, and laws related to these challenges. Artificial nutrition and hydration may be futile and reduce quality of life. They can also harm the terminally ill patient because of complications such as aspiration pneumonia, dyspnea, nausea, diarrhea, and hypervolemia. From the perspective of Islam, rules governing the care of terminally ill patients are derived from the principle (...)
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  7. Zac Alstin (2012). Volume 22 Issue 3 - 'Apres Moi Le Deluge'. Bioethics Research Notes 22 (3):42-.
    Alstin, Zac The increasing support that euthanasia is gathering in South Australia with a new euthanasia bill about to be passed is discussed. Some of the implicit and explicit challenges and pressures that the introduction of such a bill will pose are highlighted.
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  8. Zac Alstin (2010). Apres Moi Le Deluge. Bioethics Research Notes 22 (3):42.
    Alstin, Zac The increasing support that euthanasia is gathering in South Australia with a new euthanasia bill about to be passed is discussed. Some of the implicit and explicit challenges and pressures that the introduction of such a bill will pose are highlighted.
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  9. Zac Alstin (2010). The Inherent Instability of Euthanasia. Bioethics Research Notes 22 (2):15.
    Alstin, Zac Euthanasia, which is defined as the intentional killing of another human being, is compared with the established categories of killing in self-defence or as a foreseeable consequence of medical treatment.
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  10. A. T. Altschul (1990). Euthanasia: The Good Death. Journal of Medical Ethics 16 (4):218-218.
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  11. T. Altug & C. Karaca (forthcoming). Bayrak, I., Analgesia and Euthanasia of Animals in Research. Bioethics Congress.
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  12. Kumar Amarasekara & Mirko Bagaric (2004). Moving From Voluntary Euthanasia to Non-Voluntary Euthanasia: Equality and Compassion. Ratio Juris 17 (3):398-423.
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  13. D. W. Amundsen (1995). Suffering and the Sovereignty of God: One Evangelical's Perspective on Doctor-Assisted Suicide. Christian Bioethics 1 (3):285-313.
    This paper presents my personal convictions, as an Evangelical, regarding the absolute impropriety of doctor-assisted suicide for Christians. They have been “bought with a price” and are owned by Another. Hence, they must always strive to glorify God in their bodies, both in life and in death. Although they crave the well-being of temporal health, when they are ill seek healing or relief, and may well recoil even from the thought of suffering and dying, they should realize that their values (...)
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  14. Marcia Angell (2000). Voluntary Euthanasia Shows Compassion for the Dying. In James D. Torr (ed.), Euthanasia: Opposing Viewpoints. Greenhaven Press 46--54.
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  15. Floyd Angus & Robert Burakoff (2006). The Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy Tube : Medical and Ethical Issues in Placement. In Arthur L. Caplan, James J. McCartney & Dominic A. Sisti (eds.), The Case of Terri Schiavo: Ethics at the End of Life. Prometheus Books
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  16. Francisco Javier Ansuátegui Roig (2009). Euthanasia, Philosophy, and the Law: A Jurist's View From Madrid. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 18 (03):262-.
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  17. Jacob M. Appel (2009). Neonatal Euthanasia: Why Require Parental Consent? [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (4):477-482.
    The Dutch rules governing neonatal euthanasia, known as the Groningen Protocol, require parental consent for severely disabled infants with poor prognoses to have their lives terminated. This paper questions whether parental consent should be dispositive in such cases, and argues that the potential suffering of the neonate or pediatric patient should be the decisive factor under such unfortunate circumstances.
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  18. A. J. V. D. Arend (1998). An Ethical Perspective on Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide in the Netherlands From a Nursing Point of View. Nursing Ethics 5 (4):307-318.
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  19. Joachim Asscher (2007). Killing and Letting Die: The Similarity Criterion. Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (3):271–282.
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  20. Cynthia Anamaya Atsina (2002). Global Dialectics of Narrative Identity: Mediating the Voluntary and the Involuntary. Dissertation, University of San Francisco
    Philosophical anthropology and critical interpretive theory provide the context for this inquiry exploring aspects of self and modes of being-in-the-world. Building on the work of Paul Ricoeur and Martin Heidegger, the investigation provides insight into: an understanding of how the voluntary and the involuntary influence and shape the narrative identity of self with self and of self in relation with other---addressing the question, Who is it that we are?; an understanding of how the voluntary and the involuntary are reflected in (...)
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  21. Adejumobi Ayodele (2009). Euthanasia: Some Critical Remarks. Etica E Politica 11 (1):441-454.
    Euthanasia is generally regarded as killing in order to put an end to the unrelieved pain and suffering of a patient. Most terminal diseases are often associated with unrelieved pain and suffering, as a result advocates of euthanasia have argued for the legalization of euthanasia on the ground of compassion for the patients’ suffering. However advancement in medicine has made it possible for modern medicine to reduce pain and suffering to the barest minimum. The questions that arise from this are, (...)
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  22. Azam Golam/Golam Azam (2006). Moral Permissibility of Euthanasia: A Case Discussion From Bangladesh. The Dhaka University Studies 63 (2):157-169.
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  23. Elvio Baccarini, Questions of Life and Death.
    The research started with a definition of the general ethical background to be applied in bioethical discussions, particularly regarding aspects of morality that have to be enforced by the community. Only those moral beliefs that can be accepted by consensus in a free discussion can be enforced. It follows that the basic principle of a well ordered society is the equality (and possible upwards extension) of the basic liberties. Therefore, whenever it is possible to respect the principle of autonomy in (...)
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  24. Sarah Bachelard (2002). On Euthanasia: Blindspots in the Argument From Mercy. Journal of Applied Philosophy 19 (2):131–140.
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  25. Robert M. Baird & Stuart E. Rosenbaum (eds.) (1989). Euthanasia: The Moral Issues. Prometheus Books.
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  26. Melanie Ilene Baker (1998). The Morality of Physician-Assisted Suicide and Other Types of Voluntary Euthanasia: Dismantling the Conceptual Framework Supporting the Status Quo. Dissertation, Purdue University
    The purpose of the present study is to determine if physician-assisted suicide is ever morally justified and, if so, under what conditions. We begin with a brief introduction of the current debate surrounding the issue of physician-assisted suicide. Chapter One is devoted to establishing the sufficient conditions for an act to constitute suicide. We argue that some acts which are considered to be praiseworthy are in fact acts of suicide. We also argue that some medical practices which are currently considered (...)
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  27. Joseph L. Barbiero (1990). Request for Help. The Chesterton Review 16 (2):115-115.
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  28. R. Barcaro (1998). Eutanasia e suicidio assistito: controversie nel dibattito etico [Euthanasia and assisted suicide: Disagreements in the ethical debate]. Verifiche: Rivista Trimestrale di Scienze Umane 27 (3-4):339-348.
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  29. Rosangela Barcaro (2015). Qui décide de la dignité de mourir? [Who decides the dignity of dying?]. Arc En Ciel. La Revue de Nouveaux Droits de L’Homme (74):16-17.
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  30. Rosangela Barcaro (2014). L'éthique et les professions de la santé [Ethics and the healthcare professionals]. Arc En Ciel. La Revue de Nouveaux Droits de L’Homme (73):10.
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  31. Rosangela Barcaro (2001). The Loss of the Sense of Illness: Euthanasia and the Right to Die. In Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka & Evandro Agazzi (eds.), Life Interpretation and the Sense of Illness Within the Human Condition. Kluwer Academic Publishers 147-152.
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  32. Rosangela Barcaro (2001). The Right to Die Debate: A Survey. Global Bioethics 14 (1): 85-90.
    In the present article the concept of the right to die will be analyzed in English and American literature between 1990 and 1994.
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  33. Rosangela Barcaro (1996). A proposito del diritto di morire [On the right to die debate]. Bioetica 4 (3):499-510.
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  34. Rosangela Barcaro & Paolo Becchi (2011). La filosofia di fronte ai limiti della vita: i problemi della bioetica [Philosophy and the borders of life: some bioethical problems]. In La ricerca del sapere. 3. Da Schopenhauer alla filosofia contemporanea, edited by Santino Mele. 643-660.
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  35. Y. Michael Barilan & Moshe Weintraub (2001). Pantagruelism: A Rabelaisian Inspiration for Understanding Poisoning, Euthanasia and Abortion in the Hippocratic Oath and in Contemporary Clinical Practice. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 22 (3):269-286.
    Contrary to the common view, this paper suggests that the Hippocratic oath does not directly refer to the controversial subjects of euthanasia and abortion. We interpret the oath in the context of establishing trust in medicine through departure from Pantagruelism. Pantagruelism is coined after Rabelais' classic novel Gargantua and Pantagruel. His satire about a wonder herb, Pantagruelion, is actually a sophisticated model of anti-medicine in which absence of independent moral values and of properly conducted research fashion a flagrant over-medicalization of (...)
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  36. Fr Robert Barry (1987). The Case Against Active Voluntary Euthanasia. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 15 (3):161-163.
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  37. Robert Barry (1985). Linacre Center: "Euthanasia and Clinical Practice". [REVIEW] The Thomist 49 (3):487.
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  38. Robert Laurence Barry (1989). Medical Ethics: Essays on Abortion and Euthanasia. P. Lang.
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  39. P. Bartmann (2003). Physician-Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: German Protestantism, Conscience, and the Limits of Purely Ethical Reflection. Christian Bioethics 9 (2-3):203-225.
    In this essay I shall describe and analyse the current debate on physician assisted suicide in contemporary German Protestant church and theology. It will be shown that the Protestant Church in Germany together with her Roman Catholic sister church has a specific and influential position in the public discussion: The two churches counting the majority of the population in Germany among their members tend to “organize” a social and political consensus on end-of-life questions. This cooperation is until now very successful: (...)
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  40. Archna Barua (1996). A Note On--Euthanasia and the Contemporary Debate. Indian Philosophical Quarterly 23 (3-4):467-472.
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  41. L. Basta (2001). Life and Death on Your Own Terms. Prometheus Books.
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  42. M. P. Battin & T. J. Bole (1993). What If Euthanasia Were Legal? Introducing the Issue. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 18 (3):237-240.
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  43. M. Pabst Battin (2005). Ending Life: Ethics and the Way We Die. Oxford University Press.
    Margaret Pabst Battin has established a reputation as one of the top philosophers working in bioethics today. This work is a sequel to Battin's 1994 volume The Least Worst Death. The last ten years have seen fast-moving developments in end-of-life issues, from the legalization of physician-assisted suicide in Oregon and the Netherlands to furor over proposed restrictions of scheduled drugs used for causing death, and the development of "NuTech" methods of assistance in dying. Battin's new collection covers a remarkably wide (...)
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  44. Margaret Battin (2007). Right Question, But Not Quite the Right Answer: Whether There Is a Third Alternative in Choices About Euthanasia in Alzheimer's Disease. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (4):58-60.
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  45. Margaret Battin (1992). Voluntary Euthanasia and the Risks of Abuse: Can We Learn Anything From the Netherlands? Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 20 (1-2):133-143.
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  46. Margaret P. Battin (1989). Seven Caveats Concerning the Discussion of Euthanasia in Holland. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 34 (1):73-77.
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  47. T. L. Beauchamp & A. I. Davidson (1979). The Definition of Euthanasia. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 4 (3):294-312.
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  48. Tom L. Beauchamp & Seymour Perlin (1981). Ethical Issues in Death and Dying. Philosophy and Rhetoric 14 (2):132-133.
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  49. Tom L. Beauchamp & L. Walters (forthcoming). Euthanasia and the Prolongation of Life. Contemporary Issues in Bioethics.
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  50. D. Beck (2004). Is Terminal Sedation Medically Useful or Replaceable? Ethik in der Medizin 16:334-341.
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