This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
38 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Order:
  1. Leslie Allan, Plantinga's Free Will Defence: Critical Note.
    Some atheistic philosophers have argued that God could have created a world with free moral agents and yet absent of moral evil. Using possible world semantics, Alvin Plantinga sought to defuse this logical form of the problem of evil. In this critical note, Leslie Allan examines the adequacy of Plantinga's argument that the existence of God is logically compatible with the existence of moral evil. The veracity of Plantinga's argument turns on whether his essential use of counterfactual conditionals preserves the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Peter Brian Barry (2011). Wickedness Redux. Philo 14 (2):137-160.
    Some philosophers have argued that the concepts of evil and wickedness cannot be well grasped by those inclined to a naturalist bent, perhaps because evil is so intimately tied to religious discourse or because it is ultimately not possible to understand evil, period. By contrast, I argue that evil—or, at least, what it is to be an evil person—can be understood by naturalist philosophers, and I articulate an independently plausible account of evil character.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Linda A. Bell (2009). Challenging the Genteel Supports of Atrocities: A Response to "The Atrocity Paradigm". Hypatia 24 (1):123 - 140.
    Inspired by Card's focus on atrocities, I reflect on attitudes and behaviors that buttress and support evil. Surely, the frequent anti-Semitic sermons in German churches helped to form and later to support the views of both Nazis and those who accepted and cooperated with them. Similarly, lynching, rape, and abuse occur within societies whose structures and laws reflect dominant, generally "genteel" racism and sexism and, in turn, help create perpetrators and at least somewhat sympathetic onlookers.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Peg Birmingham (2003). Holes of Oblivion: The Banality of Radical Evil. Hypatia 18 (1):80-103.
  5. Andrei A. Buckareff & Allen Plug (2013). Hell and the Problem of Evil. In Justin McBrayer & Daniel Howard-Snyder (eds.), Companion to the Problem of Evil. Wiley-Blackwell 128-143.
    The case is discussed for the doctrine of hell as posing a unique problem of evil for adherents to the Abrahamic religions who endorse traditional theism. The problem is particularly acute for those who accept retributivist formulations of the doctrine of hell according to which hell is everlasting punishment for failing to satisfy some requirement. Alternatives to retributivism are discussed, including the unique difficulties that each one faces.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Andrei A. Buckareff & Allen Plug (2005). Escaping Hell: Divine Motivation and the Problem of Hell. Religious Studies 41 (1):39-54.
    We argue that it is most rational for God, given God's character and policies, to adopt an open-door policy towards those in hell – making it possible for those in hell to escape. We argue that such a policy towards the residents of hell should issue from God's character and motivational states. In particular, God's parental love ought to motivate God to extend the provision for reconciliation with Him for an infinite amount of time.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  7. Andrei Buckareff & Allen Plug (2009). Escapism, Religious Luck, and Divine Reasons for Action. Religious Studies 45 (1):63-72.
    In our paper, ‘Escaping hell: divine motivation and the problem of hell’, we defended a theory of hell that we called ‘escapism’. We argued that given God’s just and loving character it would be most rational for God to maintain an open door policy to those who are in hell, allowing them an unlimited number of chances to be reconciled with God and enjoy communion with God. In this paper we reply to two recent objections to our original paper. The (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  8. T. Ryan Byerly (2015). What's Wrong with Satanic Temptation? In Benjamin McCraw & Robert Arp (eds.), Philosophical Approaches to the Devil. Routledge 159-68.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Laura Frances Callahan (2016). On the Problem of Paradise. Faith and Philosophy 33 (2):129-141.
    Benton, Hawthorne, and Isaacs (BHI) claim that evil must be evidence against God’s existence, because the absence of evil would be (presumably excellent) evidence for it. Their argument is obviously valid on standard Bayesian epistemology. But in addition to raising a few reasons one might doubt its premise, I here highlight the rather misleading meaning, in BHI’s argument, of evil’s being evidence against God. BHI seek to establish that if one learned simply “that there was evil,” perhaps via an oracle, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Laura Frances Callahan (2016). On the Problem of Paradise. Faith and Philosophy 2:129-141.
    Benton, Hawthorne, and Isaacs claim that evil must be evidence against God’s existence, because the absence of evil would be evidence for it. Their argument is obviously valid on standard Bayesian epistemology. But in addition to raising a few reasons one might doubt its premise, I here highlight the rather misleading meaning, in BHI’s argument, of evil ’s being evidence against God. BHI seek to establish that if one learned simply “that there was evil,” perhaps via an oracle, one would (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Subhasis Chattopadhyay (2016). Review of Paul Ricoeur's Evil: A Challenge to Philosophy and Theology. [REVIEW] Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 121 (June (6)):529-30.
    This review shows how Pierre Gisel's comments on Ricoeur are redundant; how Graham Ward gets Ricoeur's understanding of evil clearly; but then it goes on to show how both Gisel and Ward do not understand/mention the influence of St. Paul and Jürgen Moltmann on Ricoeur.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Andrea Ciceri (2011). La lettura del male radicale in Kant proposta da Italo Mancini. Rivista di Filosofia Neo-Scolastica 4 (2011):691-706.
    The contribution examines Italo Mancini'suggestion to reread Kant's radical evil in the light of a reconsideration of the scope of reason in Kant's philosophy of religion.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Andrea Ciceri (2011). The Reading of Radical Evil in Kant Proposed by Italo Mancini. Rivista di Filosofia Neo-Scolastica 103 (4):691-705.
    The contribution examines Italo Mancini'suggestion to reread Kant's radical evil in the light of a reconsideration of the scope of reason in Kant's philosophy of religion.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. John Danaher (2014). Skeptical Theism and Divine Permission - A Reply to Anderson. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 75 (2):101-118.
    Skeptical theism (ST) may undercut the key inference in the evidential argument from evil, but it does so at a cost. If ST is true, then we lose our ability to assess the all things considered (ATC) value of natural events and states of affairs. And if we lose that ability, a whole slew of undesirable consequences follow. So goes a common consequential critique of ST. In a recent article, Anderson has argued that this consequential critique is flawed. Anderson claims (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  15. Margaret Ann Denike (2003). The Devil's Insatiable Sex: A Genealogy of Evil Incarnate. Hypatia 18 (1):10-43.
    : This paper traces the political economy of the Christian concept of "evil" incarnate and its concomitant operations of sexual abjection and the repudiation of femininity, beginning with the early church's inaugural struggles to impose its monotheistic Law against maternal paganism. With attention to how "evil" has been deployed to sanction and sanctify the persecution of scapegoats, and particularly of heretics and witches, I examine the masculinist struggles for jurisdiction and control over women.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. Mary Anne Franks (2003). Obscene Undersides: Women and Evil Between the Taliban and the United States. Hypatia 18 (1):135-156.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. Jennifer L. Geddes (2003). Banal Evil and Useless Knowledge: Hannah Arendt and Charlotte Delbo on Evil After the Holocaust. Hypatia 18 (1):104-115.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. Jennifer L. Geddes & Giorgio Agamblen (2003). Evil After Postmodernism: Postmodernism, Narratives and Ethics. Hypatia 18 (2):197-204.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. Trudy Govier (2011). Evil, Political Violence, and Forgiveness: Essays in Honor of Claudia Card. Edited by Andrea Veltman and Kathryn J.Norlock. Hypatia 26 (4):881-883.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Richard Greene & K. Silem Mohammed (eds.) (2006). The Undead and Philosophy. Open Court.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. Allan Hazlett (2012). Non-Moral Evil. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 36 (1):18-34.
    There is, I shall assume, such a thing as moral evil (more on which below). My question is whether is also such a thing as non-moral evil, and in particular whether there are such things as aesthetic evil and epistemic evil. More exactly, my question is whether there is such a thing as moral evil but not such a thing as non-moral evil, in some sense that reveals something special about the moral, as opposed to such would-be non-moral domains as (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Jeff Kochan (2016). The Eggs Speak Up: Review of Fuller's Knowledge. [REVIEW] Metascience 25 (1):12-18, 23.
    Contribution to a book symposium on Steve Fuller's _Knowledge: The Philosophical Quest in History_ (Routledge, 2015). The title reproduces the title of an essay by Hannah Arendt. Fuller uses the idea of theodicy to promote a creationist philosophy of science, according to which one is justified in breaking eggs in order to produce a divine omelette of technologically orchestrated human transcendence. The review nods to Arendt's essay, and a short story by Ursula LeGuin, in challenging this proposal.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. Jonathan L. Kvanvig (2008). ``Hell&Quot. In Jerry L. Walls (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Eschatology. Oxford: Oxford University Press 413-427.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. Michael Lacewing (2009). The Psychology of Evil: A Contribution From Psychoanalysis. In Pedro Alexis Tabensky (ed.), The Positive Function of Evil. Palgrave Macmillan
    It has often been noted that evil – by which I mean evil in human motivation and action – is difficult to understand. We find it hard to make sense of what ‘drives’ a person to commit evil. This is not because we cannot recognise or identify with some aspect of the psychology of evil; we all experience feelings of envy, spite, cruelty, and hatred. But somehow this shared experience can seem insufficient, and we are left at a loss as (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. John Lamont (2011). The Justice and Goodness of Hell. Faith and Philosophy 28 (2):152-173.
    The paper considers the objections to Christianity raised by David Lewis, which accuse Christians of immorality on the grounds of their worshipping a monstrous being who punishes finite evils by the infinite punishment of hell. It distinguishes between the objection that God is a monster because such punishment would be unjust, and the objection that even if damnation is just, God is a monster because he wills or allows the dreadful evil of hell by creating beings that can be justly (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  26. Eugene Marshall (forthcoming). Spinoza on Evil. In The History of Evil. Volume III: The History of Evil in the Early Modern Age (1450-1700). Acumen Press
  27. Eduardo Mendieta (2003). Rethinking Evil: Contemporary Perspectives (Review). Hypatia 18 (2):208-213.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. Eduardo Mendieta (2003). Book Review: Mar�a P�a Lara. Rethinking Evil: Contemporary Perspectives. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2001. [REVIEW] Hypatia 18 (2):208-213.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. Moti Mizrahi (2014). The Problem of Natural Inequality: A New Problem of Evil. Philosophia 42 (1):127-136.
    In this paper, I argue that there is a kind of evil, namely, the unequal distribution of natural endowments, or natural inequality, which presents theists with a new evidential problem of evil. The problem of natural inequality is a new evidential problem of evil not only because, to the best of my knowledge, it has not yet been discussed in the literature, but also because available theodicies, such the free will defense and the soul-making defense, are not adequate responses in (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. Anne Morgan (2009). Simone de Beauvoir's Ethics, the Master/Slave Dialectic, and Eichmann as a Sub-Man. Hypatia 24 (2):39 - 53.
    Simone de Beauvoir incorporates a significantly altered form of the Hegelian master/slave dialectic into "The Ethics of Ambiguity." Her ethical theory explains and denounces extreme wrongdoing, such as the mass murder of millions of Jews at the hands of the Nazis. This essay demonstrates that, in the Beauvoirean dialectic, the Nazi value system (and Hitler) was the master, Adolf Eichmann was a slave, and Jews were denied human status. The analysis counters Robin May Schott's claims that "Beauvoir portrays the attitudes (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. María Pía Lara (2004). Claudia Card's Atrocity Paradigm. Hypatia 19 (4):184-191.
    This paper deals with Claudia Card's important contributions to a theory of evil that steps out from traditional models of thinking about this problem . Instead, our author seeks to explore important elements from other theorists in order to build up her ideas of what she calls the "atrocity paradigm." This critical essay focuses mainly in the spaces where Card's conclusions need to rethink the limits and constraints of her theory.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32. Hilary Radner (2003). Book Review: Cynthia A. Freeland. The Naked and the Undead: Evil and the Appeal of Horror. Boulder: Westview Press. 2000. [REVIEW] Hypatia 18 (2):215-222.
  33. Michael C. Rea (2013). Skeptical Theism and the 'Too-Much-Skepticism' Objection. In Justin P. McBrayer & Daniel Howard-Snyder (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to The Problem of Evil. John Wiley & Sons 482-506.
    In the first section, I characterize skeptical theism more fully. This is necessary in order to address some important misconceptions and mischaracterizations that appear in the essays by Maitzen, Wilks, and O’Connor. In the second section, I describe the most important objections they raise and group them into four “families” so as to facilitate an orderly series of responses. In the four sections that follow, I respond to the objections.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. Sara Ruddick (2003). The Moral Horror of the September Attacks. Hypatia 18 (1):212 - 222.
    : I try to identify the distinct moral horror occasioned by the attacks of September 11 in order to accord them an appropriate, limited place in the ongoing history of terror and violence. I consider the agents of evil and the victims as evil constructs them. I conclude with victim stories that reveal evil by showing the goodness it violates, making us feel the bitter loss of what violence has killed, kills, and will kill again.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Samuel Shearn (2013). Moral Critique and Defence of Theodicy. Religious Studies 49 (4):439-458.
    In this essay, moral anti-theodicy is characterized as opposition to the trivialization of suffering, defined as the reinterpretation of horrendous evils in a way the sufferer cannot accept. Ambitious theodicy (which claim goods emerge from specific evils) is deemed always to trivialize horrendous evils and, because there is no specific theoretical context, also harm sufferers. Moral anti-theodicy is susceptible to two main criticisms. First, it is over-demanding as a moral position. Second, anti-theodicist opposition to least ambitious theodicies, which portray God's (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  36. Manuel Vargas (2010). Are Psychopathic Serial Killers Evil? Are They Blameworthy for What They Do? In Sarah Waller (ed.), Serial Killers and Philosophy. Blackwell
    At least some serial killers are psychopathic serial killers. Psychopathic serial killers raise interesting questions about the nature of evil and moral responsibility. On the one hand, serial killers seem to be obviously evil, if anything is. On the other hand, psychopathy is a diagnosable disorder that, among other things, involves a diminished ability to understand and use basic moral distinctions. This feature of psychopathy suggests that psychopathic serial killers have at least diminished responsibility for what they do. In this (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. Manuel Vargas (2006). Dead Serious: Evil and the Ontology of the Undead. In Richard Greene & K. Silem Mohammed (eds.), The Undead and Philosophy. Open Court
    I don’t know whether undead beings exist. I also think it is an open question whether anyone is evil in, say, the way bad guys are depicted in supernatural horror films and serial killer movies. I do think it’s nevertheless puzzling that the undead are frequently portrayed as evil in that way. I’m inclined to think that if we were to stumble across any undead they would be less likely to be evil than any random live person we stumble across. (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. Sarah Waller (ed.) (2010). Serial Killers and Philosophy. Blackwell.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography