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  1. Peter Brian Barry (2011). Wickedness Redux. Philo 14 (2):137-160.
    Some philosophers have argued that the concepts of evil and wickedness cannot be well grasped by those inclined to a naturalist bent, perhaps because evil is so intimately tied to religious discourse or because it is ultimately not possible to understand evil, period. By contrast, I argue that evil—or, at least, what it is to be an evil person—can be understood by naturalist philosophers, and I articulate an independently plausible account of evil character.
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  2. Linda A. Bell (2009). Challenging the Genteel Supports of Atrocities: A Response to "The Atrocity Paradigm". Hypatia 24 (1):123 - 140.
    Inspired by Card's focus on atrocities, I reflect on attitudes and behaviors that buttress and support evil. Surely, the frequent anti-Semitic sermons in German churches helped to form and later to support the views of both Nazis and those who accepted and cooperated with them. Similarly, lynching, rape, and abuse occur within societies whose structures and laws reflect dominant, generally "genteel" racism and sexism and, in turn, help create perpetrators and at least somewhat sympathetic onlookers.
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  3. Andrei A. Buckareff & Allen Plug (2013). Hell and the Problem of Evil. In Justin McBrayer & Daniel Howard-Snyder (eds.), Companion to the Problem of Evil. Wiley-Blackwell. 128-143.
    The case is discussed for the doctrine of hell as posing a unique problem of evil for adherents to the Abrahamic religions who endorse traditional theism. The problem is particularly acute for those who accept retributivist formulations of the doctrine of hell according to which hell is everlasting punishment for failing to satisfy some requirement. Alternatives to retributivism are discussed, including the unique difficulties that each one faces.
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  4. Andrei A. Buckareff & Allen Plug (2005). Escaping Hell: Divine Motivation and the Problem of Hell. Religious Studies 41 (1):39-54.
    We argue that it is most rational for God, given God's character and policies, to adopt an open-door policy towards those in hell – making it possible for those in hell to escape. We argue that such a policy towards the residents of hell should issue from God's character and motivational states. In particular, God's parental love ought to motivate God to extend the provision for reconciliation with Him for an infinite amount of time.
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  5. Andrei Buckareff & Allen Plug (2009). Escapism, Religious Luck, and Divine Reasons for Action. Religious Studies 45 (1):63-72.
    In our paper, ‘Escaping hell: divine motivation and the problem of hell’, we defended a theory of hell that we called ‘escapism’. We argued that given God’s just and loving character it would be most rational for God to maintain an open door policy to those who are in hell, allowing them an unlimited number of chances to be reconciled with God and enjoy communion with God. In this paper we reply to two recent objections to our original paper. The (...)
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  6. Andrea Ciceri (2011). La lettura del male radicale in Kant proposta da Italo Mancini. Rivista di Filosofia Neo-Scolastica 4 (2011):691-706.
    The contribution examines Italo Mancini'suggestion to reread Kant's radical evil in the light of a reconsideration of the scope of reason in Kant's philosophy of religion.
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  7. Andrea Ciceri (2011). The Reading of Radical Evil in Kant Proposed by Italo Mancini. Rivista di Filosofia Neo-Scolastica 103 (4):691-705.
    The contribution examines Italo Mancini'suggestion to reread Kant's radical evil in the light of a reconsideration of the scope of reason in Kant's philosophy of religion.
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  8. John Danaher (2014). Skeptical Theism and Divine Permission - A Reply to Anderson. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 75 (2):101-118.
    Skeptical theism (ST) may undercut the key inference in the evidential argument from evil, but it does so at a cost. If ST is true, then we lose our ability to assess the all things considered (ATC) value of natural events and states of affairs. And if we lose that ability, a whole slew of undesirable consequences follow. So goes a common consequential critique of ST. In a recent article, Anderson has argued that this consequential critique is flawed. Anderson claims (...)
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  9. Margaret Ann Denike (2003). The Devil's Insatiable Sex: A Genealogy of Evil Incarnate. Hypatia 18 (1):10-43.
    : This paper traces the political economy of the Christian concept of "evil" incarnate and its concomitant operations of sexual abjection and the repudiation of femininity, beginning with the early church's inaugural struggles to impose its monotheistic Law against maternal paganism. With attention to how "evil" has been deployed to sanction and sanctify the persecution of scapegoats, and particularly of heretics and witches, I examine the masculinist struggles for jurisdiction and control over women.
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  10. Trudy Govier (2011). Evil, Political Violence, and Forgiveness: Essays in Honor of Claudia Card. Edited by Andrea Veltman and Kathryn J.Norlock. Hypatia 26 (4):881-883.
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  11. Richard Greene & K. Silem Mohammed (eds.) (2006). The Undead and Philosophy. Open Court.
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  12. Allan Hazlett (2012). Non-Moral Evil. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 36 (1):18-34.
    There is, I shall assume, such a thing as moral evil (more on which below). My question is whether is also such a thing as non-moral evil, and in particular whether there are such things as aesthetic evil and epistemic evil. More exactly, my question is whether there is such a thing as moral evil but not such a thing as non-moral evil, in some sense that reveals something special about the moral, as opposed to such would-be non-moral domains as (...)
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  13. Jonathan L. Kvanvig (2008). ``Hell&Quot. In Jerry L. Walls (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Eschatology. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 413-427.
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  14. Michael Lacewing (2009). The Psychology of Evil: A Contribution From Psychoanalysis. In Pedro Alexis Tabensky (ed.), The Positive Function of Evil. Palgrave Macmillan.
    It has often been noted that evil – by which I mean evil in human motivation and action – is difficult to understand. We find it hard to make sense of what ‘drives’ a person to commit evil. This is not because we cannot recognise or identify with some aspect of the psychology of evil; we all experience feelings of envy, spite, cruelty, and hatred. But somehow this shared experience can seem insufficient, and we are left at a loss as (...)
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  15. Eugene Marshall (forthcoming). Spinoza on Evil. In The History of Evil. Volume III: The History of Evil in the Early Modern Age (1450-1700). Acumen Press.
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  16. Eduardo Mendieta (2003). Book Review: Mar�a P�a Lara. Rethinking Evil: Contemporary Perspectives. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2001. [REVIEW] Hypatia 18 (2):208-213.
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  17. Eduardo Mendieta (2003). Rethinking Evil: Contemporary Perspectives (Review). Hypatia 18 (2):208-213.
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  18. Moti Mizrahi (2014). The Problem of Natural Inequality: A New Problem of Evil. Philosophia 42 (1):127-136.
    In this paper, I argue that there is a kind of evil, namely, the unequal distribution of natural endowments, or natural inequality, which presents theists with a new evidential (not logical or incompatibility) problem of evil. The problem of natural inequality is a new evidential problem of evil not only because, to the best of my knowledge, it has not yet been discussed in the literature, but also because available theodicies, such the free will defense and the soul-making defense, are (...)
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  19. Anne Morgan (2009). Simone de Beauvoir's Ethics, the Master/Slave Dialectic, and Eichmann as a Sub-Man. Hypatia 24 (2):39 - 53.
    Simone de Beauvoir incorporates a significantly altered form of the Hegelian master/slave dialectic into "The Ethics of Ambiguity." Her ethical theory explains and denounces extreme wrongdoing, such as the mass murder of millions of Jews at the hands of the Nazis. This essay demonstrates that, in the Beauvoirean dialectic, the Nazi value system (and Hitler) was the master, Adolf Eichmann was a slave, and Jews were denied human status. The analysis counters Robin May Schott's claims that "Beauvoir portrays the attitudes (...)
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  20. María Pía Lara (2004). Claudia Card's Atrocity Paradigm. Hypatia 19 (4):184-191.
  21. Hilary Radner (2003). Book Review: Cynthia A. Freeland. The Naked and the Undead: Evil and the Appeal of Horror. Boulder: Westview Press. 2000. [REVIEW] Hypatia 18 (2):215-222.
  22. Sara Ruddick (2003). The Moral Horror of the September Attacks. Hypatia 18 (1):212 - 222.
    : I try to identify the distinct moral horror occasioned by the attacks of September 11 in order to accord them an appropriate, limited place in the ongoing history of terror and violence. I consider the agents of evil and the victims as evil constructs them. I conclude with victim stories that reveal evil by showing the goodness it violates, making us feel the bitter loss of what violence has killed, kills, and will kill again.
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  23. Manuel Vargas (2010). Are Psychopathic Serial Killers Evil? Are They Blameworthy for What They Do? In Sarah Waller (ed.), Serial Killers and Philosophy. Blackwell.
    At least some serial killers are psychopathic serial killers. Psychopathic serial killers raise interesting questions about the nature of evil and moral responsibility. On the one hand, serial killers seem to be obviously evil, if anything is. On the other hand, psychopathy is a diagnosable disorder that, among other things, involves a diminished ability to understand and use basic moral distinctions. This feature of psychopathy suggests that psychopathic serial killers have at least diminished responsibility for what they do. In this (...)
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  24. Manuel Vargas (2006). Dead Serious: Evil and the Ontology of the Undead. In Richard Greene & K. Silem Mohammed (eds.), The Undead and Philosophy. Open Court.
    I don’t know whether undead beings exist. I also think it is an open question whether anyone is evil in, say, the way bad guys are depicted in supernatural horror films and serial killer movies. I do think it’s nevertheless puzzling that the undead are frequently portrayed as evil in that way. I’m inclined to think that if we were to stumble across any undead they would be less likely to be evil than any random live person we stumble across. (...)
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  25. Sarah Waller (ed.) (2010). Serial Killers and Philosophy. Blackwell.
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