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  1. Marilyn McCord Adams (1993). The Problem of Hell: A Problem of Evil for Christians. In Eleonore Stump & Norman Kretzmann (eds.), Reasoned Faith: Essays in Philosophical Theology in Honor of Norman Kretzmann. Cornell University Press.
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  2. Ira N. Adler (1975). Evil and Theism: An Analytic Approach. Dissertation, New York University
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  3. Jan A. Aertsen (1990). The Metaphysics of Good and Evil According to Suarez. Review of Metaphysics 44 (2):420-421.
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  4. M. B. Ahern (1966). The Nature of Evil. Sophia 5 (3):35-44.
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  5. M. B. Ahern (1965). A Note on the Nature of Evil. Sophia 4 (2):17-25.
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  6. Michael Almeida & Graham Oppy (2005). Reply to Trakakis and Nagasawa. Ars Disputandi 5:5-11.
    Nick Trakakis and Yujin Nagasawa criticise the argument in Almeida and Oppy . According to Trakakis and Nagasawa, we are mistaken in our claim that the sceptical theist response to evidential arguments from evil is unacceptable because it would undermine ordinary moral reasoning. In their view, there is no good reason to think that sceptical theism leads to an objectionable form of moral scepticism. We disagree. In this paper, we explain why we think that the argument of Nagasawa and Trakakis (...)
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  7. Bill Anglin & Stewart Goetz (1982). Evil is Privation. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 13 (1):3 - 12.
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  8. Peter Abengre Ayorogo (1999). Openness to God: A Comparative Study of African and Western Philosophy Concerning the Problem of Evil. Dissertation, Boston College
    The crux of the problem of evil in the West consists in positing an inconsistency between the existence of the God of theism and evil. This understanding of the problem is exemplified in the works of Hume, Mill, Hartshorne, and Marx. For them, the presence of evil, understood as an obstacle, necessarily limits either the divine attribute of omnipotence or benevolent or both. ;In contrast to this understanding is that of the Gurunse's of Ghana. They contend that the co-existence of (...)
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  9. Milan Babík (2011). The Secret Future of Evil Past. [REVIEW] Political Theory 39 (6):802 - 807.
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  10. Kenneth Baynes (2004). Understanding Evil. Constellations 11 (3):434-444.
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  11. Klaus Berger, Harald Herholz & Ulrich Niemann (eds.) (2008). Wer Verantwortet Das Böse in der Welt?: Naturphilosophie, Theologie Und Medizin Im Gespräch. Pustet.
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  12. Richard J. Bernstein (2002). Evil and the Temptation of Theodicy. In Simon Critchley & Robert Bernasconi (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Levinas. Cambridge University Press. 252--267.
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  13. Toby George Betenson, The Problem of Evil as a Moral Objection to Theism.
    I argue that the problem of evil can be a moral objection to theistic belief. The thesis has three broad sections, each establishing an element in this argument. Section one establishes the logically binding nature of the problem of evil: The problem of evil must be solved, if you are to believe in God. And yet, I borrow from J. L. Mackie’s criticisms of the moral argument for the existence of God, and argue that the fundamentally evaluative nature of the (...)
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  14. David Birnbaum (forthcoming). God and Evil: A Unified Theodicy/Theology. Philosophy.
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  15. O. P. Brophy & Justin Marie (2011). Good and Evil Actions. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 85 (3):499-500.
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  16. David Brown (2013). The Poetics of Evil: Towards an Aesthetic Theodicy, by Philip Tallon. Faith and Philosophy 30 (2):228-231.
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  17. Todd Calder (2003). The Apparent Banality of Evil: The Relationship Between Evil Acts and Evil Character. Journal of Social Philosophy 34 (3):364–376.
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  18. Claudia Card (2004). The Atrocity Paradigm Revisited. Hypatia 19 (4):212 - 222.
    This essay reflects on issues raised by commentators regarding my book, The Atrocity Paradigm: A Theory of Evil (Oxford 2002). They are (1) Robin Schott's observation of the tension between my discussion of forgiveness and of castration fantasies; (2) Bat-Ami Bar On's questions regarding whether evil is ethical, political, or both; (3) Adam Morton's queries regarding the relative seriousness of evils and injustices; and (4) María Pía Lara's concerns regarding what is valuable in Kant's ethics.
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  19. K. J. Clark (2001). PERRY, J.-Dialogue on Good, Evil, and the Existence of God. Philosophical Books 42 (2):158-160.
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  20. Daniel Cohen (2009). Creating the Best Possible World: Some Problems From Parfit. Sophia 48 (2):143-150.
    It is sometimes argued that if God were to exist, then the actual world would be the best possible world. However, given that the actual world is clearly not the best possible world, then God doesn’t exist. In response, some have argued that the world could always be improved with the creation of new people and that there is thus no best possible world. I argue that this reasoning gives rise to an instance of Parfit’s mere addition paradox and should (...)
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  21. P. Cole (2002). Gordon Graham Evil and Christian Ethics. Journal of Applied Philosophy 19 (1):75-76.
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  22. Josep E. Corbí (2012). The Apologetics of Evil. The Case of Iago, by Richard Raatzsch. [REVIEW] My Cms 4 (33).
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  23. Michael Anthony Corey (1996). Evolution and the Problem of Natural Evil: A Theological Response to Evolution-Generated Pain and Suffering That Seeks to Preserve the Divine Goodness Through the Use of a Deistic Interpretation of Modern Neo-Darwinism. Dissertation, The Union Institute
    The pain, violence and waste that is engendered by the evolutionary process--hereafter referred to as natural evil--is discussed in terms of its possible relationship to the perfectly good and all-powerful God of traditional theism. Specifically, the focus is on whether the existence of such a deity is indeed logically compatible with the existence of natural evil. ;In order to answer this question in the affirmative, the author first undertakes to demonstrate how the latest scientific evidence is strongly suggestive of an (...)
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  24. J. Angelo Corlett (2001). Surviving Evil: Jewish, African, and Native Americans. Journal of Social Philosophy 32 (2):207–223.
  25. Marcos Roberto Nunes Costa (2004). The problem of morality in the Manichaean cosmological and soteriologic system. Anales Del Seminario de Historia de la Filosofía 21:25-42.
    Manicheism is founded in two world originating ontological principles: Good or Light, presented by the sun and Evil or Darkness, personinified in the matter. From this ontological dualism proceeds the idea which man is not responsible to the evil he practices according to, but this-one (evil) is to be blamed to his bad nature, in other words evil is inherent to his corporal nature. Hence, strictly speaking, there is no real evil in manicheism, but only natural evil. However, paradoxally, manicheism (...)
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  26. C. D. (1965). Huit Essais Sur le Mal. Review of Metaphysics 18 (3):582-582.
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  27. C. D. (1964). Les Niveaux de l'Etre. Review of Metaphysics 17 (3):473-473.
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  28. Larry Elton Davis (1983). A Christian Philosophical Examination of the Picture of Evil in the Writings of J. R. R. Tolkien. Dissertation, Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary
    The Christian religious underpinnings of the writings of J. R. R. Tolkien make his works especially rewarding to theological study. The thesis of this dissertation is that the picture of evil presented in Tolkien's novels is consistent with classical Christian understandings. In particular, this dissertation seeks to establish that Tolkien's aesthetic literary presentation of evil can best be described as a mythic portrayal of the Augustinian classical Christian view of evil. ;There are several identifiable aspects of the Augustinian picture of (...)
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  29. Aaron Denlinger (2010). Ambrogio Catarino’s Doctrine of the Devil’s Fall: Christocentric Reflection on the Origin of Evil. Nova Et Vetera 8:107-124.
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  30. John Desmond (2004). Flannery O'Connor's Misfit and The Mystery of Evil. Renascence 56 (2):129-137.
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  31. Wylene Rae Wisby Detrixhe (1973). God and Evil: The Theistic Dilemma. Dissertation, Vanderbilt University
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  32. Jorge Aurelio Díaz (2006). Human Freedom Before Evil. Ideas Y Valores 55 (131):121-122.
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  33. Juan A. Estrada Díaz (2001). Teodicea y Sistemas Filosóficos: Para un cambio de modelo. Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 57 (4):683 - 709.
    O presente artigo parte do princípio de que há uma relação intrínseca entre a metafísica e a teodkeia. A primeira é um sistema que oferece sentido, inteligibilidade, verdade e universalidade. O seu pressuposto fundamental é o de Parménides e o de Hegel, ou seja, a correspondência entre ser e pensamento, a racionalidade do real e a realidade do racional. Este é o ponto de partida da teologia natural grega, do teísmo cosmológico cristão, do teísmo antropológico moderno e das filosofias do (...)
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  34. Tiphaine Dickson & Aleksandar Jokic (2006). Hear No Evil, See No Evil, Speak No Evil: The Unsightly Milosevic Case. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 19 (4):355-387.
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  35. George F. Dole (2001). Freedom & Evil: A Pilgrim's Guide to Hell. Chrysalis Books.
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  36. Paul Draper (2001). Richard Swinburne, Providence and the Problem of Evil. Noûs 35 (3):456–474.
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  37. Kirk Durston (2006). The Complexity of History and Evil: A Reply to Trakakis. Religious Studies 42 (1):87-99.
    I have presented an argument from the consequential complexity of history against certain types of evidential arguments from evil; ‘The consequential complexity of history and gratuitous evil’ Religious Studies, 36 (2000), 65–80. Nick Trakakis has responded with two objections; ‘Evil and the complexity of history: a response to Durston’ Religious Studies, 39 (2003), 451–458. He argues that the consideration of future consequences to the end of actual history may be irrelevant and, also, that one does not need detailed knowledge about (...)
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  38. Kirk K. Durston (2005). The Failure of Type-4 Arguments From Evil, in the Face of the Consequential Complexity of History. Philo 8 (2):109-122.
    Bruce Russell has classified evidential arguments from evil into four types, one of which is the type-4 argument. Rather than begin with observations of evils that appear to be gratuitous, type-4 arguments simply begin with observations of evils. The next step, and the heart of a type-4 argument, is an abductive inference (inference to the best explanation) from those observations, to the conclusion that there is gratuitous evil. Reflection upon the consequential complexity of history, however, reveals that we have no (...)
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  39. F. E. (1980). The Seven Deadly Sins. Review of Metaphysics 33 (3):641-642.
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  40. Matthew T. Eggemeier (2012). Lévinas and Ricoeur on the Possibility of God After the End of Theodicy. Philosophy and Theology 24 (1):23-48.
    This essay examines Lévinas and Ricoeur’s criticisms of the project of theodicy and analyzes their attempts to figure an approach to God that survives the end of theodicy in terms of ethics (Lévinas) or hope (Ricoeur). In conclusion, it is argued that while both thinkers engage in the important task of disassociating God from the justificatory practices of theodicy, Ricoeur’s hope in the God of the future offers more ample resources for theological appropriation than Lévinas’s approach to God within the (...)
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  41. Nadine Elzein (2015). Freedom, Teleology, and Evil, by Stewart Goetz. Mind 124 (493):338-342.
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  42. Bernard Charles Farr, Theodicy : A Critique and a Proposal.
    This thesis explores possibilities that arise from regarding theodicy as the activity of descriptive understanding of Christian belief and practice as found in the classical theistic framework. First, any theodicy as an activity is analysed in terms of the role of philosophy, the place of epistemology, the basis of theology, and the taking of an apologetic stance. It is then argued that traditional approaches to theodicy suffer from methodological weaknesses which derive from formulating theodicy in terms of unbelief, and from (...)
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  43. Ignatius Formica (1948). Nels F. S. Ferre. Evil and the Christian Faith. [REVIEW] The Thomist 11:253.
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  44. Peter Forrest (2012). Replying to the Anti-God Challenge: A God Without Moral Character Acts Well. Religious Studies 48 (1):35 - 43.
    Several authors, including Stephen Law in this journal, have argued that the case for an evil God is (about) as strong as for a good God. In this article I take up the challenge on behalf of theists who, like Richard Swinburne, argue for an agent of unrestricted power and knowledge as the ultimate explanation of all contingent truths. I shall argue that an evil God is much less probable than a good one. I do so by (1) distinguishing the (...)
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  45. Richard Gale (1996). Some Difficulties in Theistic Treatments of Evil. In Daniel Howard-Snyder (ed.), The Evidential Argument From Evil. Indiana University Press. 206--218.
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  46. R. Geivett (1995). Evil & the Evidence for God: The Challenge of John Hick's Theodicy. Temple University Press.
    How to reconcile the existence of evil with the belief in a benevolent God has long posed a philosophical problem to the system of Christian theism. This work redress this difficulty in modern terms.
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  47. Nick Gier, God, Freedom, and Evil.
    - Whitehead The novelist is still God, since he creates. . . . What has changed is that we are no longer the gods of the Victorian image, omniscient and decree­ing; but in the new theo­logical image, with freedom our first principle, not authority. . . . There is only one good definition of God: one freedom that allows other freedoms to exist.
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  48. Andrew Gleeson (2015). On Letting Go of Theodicy: Marilyn McCord Adams on God and Evil. Sophia 54 (1):1-12.
    Marilyn McCord Adams agrees with D. Z. Phillips that instrumental theodicy is a moral failure, and that sceptical theists and others are guilty of ignoring what we know now about the moral reality of horrendous evils to speculate about unknown ways these evils might be made sense of. In place of theodicy, Adams advocates ‘the logic of compensation’ for the victims of evil, a postmortem healing of divine intimacy with God. This goes so deep, she believes, that eventually victims will (...)
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  49. Vasil Gluchman (2008). Literature as Philosophical Theodicy. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 26:43-50.
    The author discusses issues of evil in Doležal’s Tragoedia (1791) influenced by Leibniz’s Theodicy (1710). Despite the fact that, in Doležal’s work, emphasis is placed on theological and religious aspects, he was able to be above too strict a theological-religious scope of the contemporary interpretation of Adam and Eve’s sin and he was even able to find a number of positive features and values that emerged for man from the origin of evil and sin. Finally, we can say that Doležal’s (...)
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  50. Stewart Goetz (2011). Freedom, Teleology, and Evil. European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 3 (2):460 - 465.
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