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  1. Marilyn McCord Adams (1993). The Problem of Hell: A Problem of Evil for Christians. In Eleonore Stump & Norman Kretzmann (eds.), Reasoned Faith: Essays in Philosophical Theology in Honor of Norman Kretzmann. Cornell University Press.
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  2. Jan A. Aertsen (1990). The Metaphysics of Good and Evil According to Suarez. Review of Metaphysics 44 (2):420-421.
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  3. M. B. Ahern (1966). The Nature of Evil. Sophia 5 (3):35-44.
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  4. M. B. Ahern (1965). A Note on the Nature of Evil. Sophia 4 (2):17-25.
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  5. Michael Almeida & Graham Oppy (2005). Reply to Trakakis and Nagasawa. Ars Disputandi 5:5-11.
    Nick Trakakis and Yujin Nagasawa criticise the argument in Almeida and Oppy . According to Trakakis and Nagasawa, we are mistaken in our claim that the sceptical theist response to evidential arguments from evil is unacceptable because it would undermine ordinary moral reasoning. In their view, there is no good reason to think that sceptical theism leads to an objectionable form of moral scepticism. We disagree. In this paper, we explain why we think that the argument of Nagasawa and Trakakis (...)
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  6. Bill Anglin & Stewart Goetz (1982). Evil is Privation. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 13 (1):3 - 12.
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  7. Kenneth Baynes (2004). Understanding Evil. Constellations 11 (3):434-444.
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  8. Klaus Berger, Harald Herholz & Ulrich Niemann (eds.) (2008). Wer Verantwortet Das Böse in der Welt?: Naturphilosophie, Theologie Und Medizin Im Gespräch. Pustet.
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  9. Richard J. Bernstein (2002). Evil and the Temptation of Theodicy. In Simon Critchley & Robert Bernasconi (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Levinas. Cambridge University Press. 252--267.
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  10. David Birnbaum (forthcoming). God and Evil: A Unified Theodicy/Theology. Philosophy.
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  11. O. P. Brophy & Justin Marie (2011). Good and Evil Actions. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 85 (3):499-500.
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  12. David Brown (2013). The Poetics of Evil: Towards an Aesthetic Theodicy, by Philip Tallon. Faith and Philosophy 30 (2):228-231.
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  13. Todd Calder (2003). The Apparent Banality of Evil: The Relationship Between Evil Acts and Evil Character. Journal of Social Philosophy 34 (3):364–376.
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  14. Claudia Card (2004). The Atrocity Paradigm Revisited. Hypatia 19 (4):212 - 222.
    This essay reflects on issues raised by commentators regarding my book, The Atrocity Paradigm: A Theory of Evil (Oxford 2002). They are (1) Robin Schott's observation of the tension between my discussion of forgiveness and of castration fantasies; (2) Bat-Ami Bar On's questions regarding whether evil is ethical, political, or both; (3) Adam Morton's queries regarding the relative seriousness of evils and injustices; and (4) María Pía Lara's concerns regarding what is valuable in Kant's ethics.
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  15. K. J. Clark (2001). PERRY, J.-Dialogue on Good, Evil, and the Existence of God. Philosophical Books 42 (2):158-160.
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  16. Daniel Cohen (2009). Creating the Best Possible World: Some Problems From Parfit. Sophia 48 (2):143-150.
    It is sometimes argued that if God were to exist, then the actual world would be the best possible world. However, given that the actual world is clearly not the best possible world, then God doesn’t exist. In response, some have argued that the world could always be improved with the creation of new people and that there is thus no best possible world. I argue that this reasoning gives rise to an instance of Parfit’s mere addition paradox and should (...)
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  17. P. Cole (2002). Gordon Graham Evil and Christian Ethics. Journal of Applied Philosophy 19 (1):75-76.
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  18. Josep E. Corbí (2012). The Apologetics of Evil. The Case of Iago, by Richard Raatzsch. [REVIEW] My Cms 4 (33).
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  19. J. Angelo Corlett (2001). Surviving Evil: Jewish, African, and Native Americans. Journal of Social Philosophy 32 (2):207–223.
  20. Marcos Roberto Nunes Costa (2004). The problem of morality in the Manichaean cosmological and soteriologic system. Anales Del Seminario de Historia de la Filosofía 21:25-42.
    Manicheism is founded in two world originating ontological principles: Good or Light, presented by the sun and Evil or Darkness, personinified in the matter. From this ontological dualism proceeds the idea which man is not responsible to the evil he practices according to, but this-one (evil) is to be blamed to his bad nature, in other words evil is inherent to his corporal nature. Hence, strictly speaking, there is no real evil in manicheism, but only natural evil. However, paradoxally, manicheism (...)
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  21. C. D. (1965). Huit Essais Sur le Mal. Review of Metaphysics 18 (3):582-582.
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  22. C. D. (1964). Les Niveaux de l'Etre. Review of Metaphysics 17 (3):473-473.
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  23. John Desmond (2004). Flannery O'Connor's Misfit and The Mystery of Evil. Renascence 56 (2):129-137.
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  24. Jorge Aurelio Díaz (2006). Human Freedom Before Evil. Ideas Y Valores 55 (131):121-122.
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  25. Tiphaine Dickson & Aleksandar Jokic (2006). Hear No Evil, See No Evil, Speak No Evil: The Unsightly Milosevic Case. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 19 (4):355-387.
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  26. George F. Dole (2001). Freedom & Evil: A Pilgrim's Guide to Hell. Chrysalis Books.
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  27. Paul Draper (2001). Richard Swinburne, Providence and the Problem of Evil. Noûs 35 (3):456–474.
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  28. Kirk Durston (2006). The Complexity of History and Evil: A Reply to Trakakis. Religious Studies 42 (1):87-99.
    I have presented an argument from the consequential complexity of history against certain types of evidential arguments from evil; ‘The consequential complexity of history and gratuitous evil’ Religious Studies, 36 (2000), 65–80. Nick Trakakis has responded with two objections; ‘Evil and the complexity of history: a response to Durston’ Religious Studies, 39 (2003), 451–458. He argues that the consideration of future consequences to the end of actual history may be irrelevant and, also, that one does not need detailed knowledge about (...)
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  29. Kirk K. Durston (2005). The Failure of Type-4 Arguments From Evil, in the Face of the Consequential Complexity of History. Philo 8 (2):109-122.
    Bruce Russell has classified evidential arguments from evil into four types, one of which is the type-4 argument. Rather than begin with observations of evils that appear to be gratuitous, type-4 arguments simply begin with observations of evils. The next step, and the heart of a type-4 argument, is an abductive inference (inference to the best explanation) from those observations, to the conclusion that there is gratuitous evil. Reflection upon the consequential complexity of history, however, reveals that we have no (...)
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  30. F. E. (1980). The Seven Deadly Sins. Review of Metaphysics 33 (3):641-642.
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  31. Matthew T. Eggemeier (2012). Lévinas and Ricoeur on the Possibility of God After the End of Theodicy. Philosophy and Theology 24 (1):23-48.
    This essay examines Lévinas and Ricoeur’s criticisms of the project of theodicy and analyzes their attempts to figure an approach to God that survives the end of theodicy in terms of ethics (Lévinas) or hope (Ricoeur). In conclusion, it is argued that while both thinkers engage in the important task of disassociating God from the justificatory practices of theodicy, Ricoeur’s hope in the God of the future offers more ample resources for theological appropriation than Lévinas’s approach to God within the (...)
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  32. Nadine Elzein (2015). Freedom, Teleology, and Evil, by Stewart Goetz. Mind 124 (493):338-342.
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  33. Peter Forrest (2012). Replying to the Anti-God Challenge: A God Without Moral Character Acts Well. Religious Studies 48 (1):35 - 43.
    Several authors, including Stephen Law in this journal, have argued that the case for an evil God is (about) as strong as for a good God. In this article I take up the challenge on behalf of theists who, like Richard Swinburne, argue for an agent of unrestricted power and knowledge as the ultimate explanation of all contingent truths. I shall argue that an evil God is much less probable than a good one. I do so by (1) distinguishing the (...)
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  34. Richard Gale (1996). Some Difficulties in Theistic Treatments of Evil. In Daniel Howard-Snyder (ed.), The Evidential Argument From Evil. Indiana University Press. 206--218.
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  35. R. Geivett (1995). Evil & the Evidence for God: The Challenge of John Hick's Theodicy. Temple University Press.
    How to reconcile the existence of evil with the belief in a benevolent God has long posed a philosophical problem to the system of Christian theism. This work redress this difficulty in modern terms.
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  36. Nick Gier, God, Freedom, and Evil.
    - Whitehead The novelist is still God, since he creates. . . . What has changed is that we are no longer the gods of the Victorian image, omniscient and decree­ing; but in the new theo­logical image, with freedom our first principle, not authority. . . . There is only one good definition of God: one freedom that allows other freedoms to exist.
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  37. Andrew Gleeson (forthcoming). On Letting Go of Theodicy: Marilyn McCord Adams on God and Evil. Sophia:1-12.
    Marilyn McCord Adams agrees with D. Z. Phillips that instrumental theodicy is a moral failure, and that sceptical theists and others are guilty of ignoring what we know now (in this life) about the moral reality of horrendous evils to speculate about unknown ways these evils might be made sense of. In place of theodicy, Adams advocates ‘the logic of compensation’ for the victims of evil, a postmortem healing of divine intimacy with God. This goes so deep, she believes, that (...)
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  38. Vasil Gluchman (2008). Literature as Philosophical Theodicy. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 26:43-50.
    The author discusses issues of evil in Doležal’s Tragoedia (1791) influenced by Leibniz’s Theodicy (1710). Despite the fact that, in Doležal’s work, emphasis is placed on theological and religious aspects, he was able to be above too strict a theological-religious scope of the contemporary interpretation of Adam and Eve’s sin and he was even able to find a number of positive features and values that emerged for man from the origin of evil and sin. Finally, we can say that Doležal’s (...)
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  39. Stewart Goetz (2011). Freedom, Teleology, and Evil. European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 3 (2):460 - 465.
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  40. G. Graham (2006). Review: The Roots of Evil. [REVIEW] Mind 115 (460):1133-1135.
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  41. Amir Hamed (2007). Mal y Neomal: Rudimentos de Geoidiocia. Amuleto.
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  42. Robin Harwood (2000). A Review of Nonbelief and Evil by Theodore M. Drange. [REVIEW] Philosophical Inquiry 22 (1-2):135-139.
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  43. William Hasker (2011). Of Natural Evil. In Ken Perszyk (ed.), Molinism: The Contemporary Debate. Oup Oxford. 281.
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  44. Daniel M. Haybron (ed.) (2002). Earth’s Abominations: Philosophical Studies of Evil. Rodopi.
    This book philosophically explores a wide range of subjects relating to evil and human wickedness, including the nature of evil, explaining evil, evil and moral responsibility, and responding to evil.
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  45. Agnes Heller (2011). On Evils, Evil, Radical Evil and the Demonic. Critical Horizons 12 (1):15-27.
    This article explores the problem of evil from a post-metaphysical position. Distinguishing between good and evil remains no less a pressing task in a world after the "death of God".
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  46. Jill Graper Hernandez (2013). The Anxious Believer: Macaulay's Prescient Theodicy. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 73 (3):175-187.
    Recent feminists have critiqued G.W. Leibniz’s Theodicy for its effort to justify God’s role in undeserved human suffering over natural and moral evil. These critiques suggest that theodicies which focus on evil as suffering alone obfuscate how to thematize evil, and so they conclude that theodicies should be rejected and replaced with a secularized notion of evil that is inextricably tied to the experiences of the victim. This paper argues that the political philosophy found in the writings of Catherine Macaulay (...)
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  47. M. A. Hernandez (2009). A New Approach on the Long-Standing Problem of Evil: Maria Pia Lara, Narrating Evil: A Postmetaphysical Theory of Reflective Judgment (New York: Columbia University Press, 2007), 230 Pp. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Social Criticism 35 (3):357-362.
    In recent years, discussion on evil as a philosophical problem has increased. However, there is a tendency to see this problem from an aesthetic point of view, to frame it in theodicy's plot, or even to suggest silence in front of those extreme forms of evil that are linked to specific episodes, such as totalitarianism or ethnic cleansing. This review article focuses on María Pía Lara's development of a postmetaphysical theory of evil in her book Narrating Evil. The main purpose (...)
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  48. Mario Alfredo Hernández (2009). A New Approach on the Long-Standing Problem of Evil: María Pía Lara, Narrating Evil: A Postmetaphysical Theory of Reflective Judgment (New York: Columbia University Press, 2007), 230 Pp. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Social Criticism 35 (3):357-362.
    In recent years, discussion on evil as a philosophical problem has increased. However, there is a tendency to see this problem from an aesthetic point of view, to frame it in theodicy's plot, or even to suggest silence in front of those extreme forms of evil that are linked to specific episodes, such as totalitarianism or ethnic cleansing. This review article focuses on María Pía Lara's development of a postmetaphysical theory of evil in her book Narrating Evil. The main purpose (...)
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  49. John Hick (1966). Evil and the God of Love. Macmillan.
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  50. James Higgins (2013). The Root of All Evil. Heythrop Journal 54 (6):n/a-n/a.
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