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  1. Francisco Aboitiz (2001). What Determines Evolutionary Brain Growth? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (2):278-279.
    Finlay et al. address the importance of developmental constraints in brain size evolution. I discuss some aspects of this view such as the relation of brain size with processing capacity. In particular, I argue that in human evolution there must have been specific selection for increased processing capacity, and as a consequence for increased brain size.
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  2. Cameron Buckner (2013). A Property Cluster Theory of Cognition. Philosophical Psychology:1-30.
    Our prominent definitions of cognition are too vague and lack empirical grounding. They have not kept up with recent developments, and cannot bear the weight placed on them across many different debates. I here articulate and defend a more adequate theory. On this theory, behaviors under the control of cognition tend to display a cluster of characteristic properties, a cluster which tends to be absent from behaviors produced by non-cognitive processes. This cluster is reverse-engineered from the empirical tests that comparative (...)
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  3. Stephen M. Downes (2002). Some Recent Developments in Evolutionary Approaches to the Study of Human Cognition and Behavior. Biology and Philosophy 16 (5):575-94.
    In this paper I review some theoretical exchanges and empiricalresults from recent work on human behavior and cognition in thehope of indicating some productive avenues for critical engagement.I focus particular attention on methodological debates between Evolutionary Psychologists and behavioral ecologists. I argue for a broader and more encompassing approach to the evolutionarily based study of human behavior and cognition than either of these two rivals present.
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  4. Charles Efferson & Peter J. Richerson (2007). A Prolegomenon to Nonlinear Empiricism in the Human Behavioral Sciences. Biology and Philosophy 22 (1):1-33.
    We propose a general framework for integrating theory and empiricism in human evolutionary ecology. We specifically emphasize the joint use of stochastic nonlinear dynamics and information theory. To illustrate critical ideas associated with historical contingency and complex dynamics, we review recent research on social preferences and social learning from behavioral economics. We additionally examine recent work on ecological approaches in history, the modeling of chaotic populations, and statistical application of information theory.
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  5. Andreas Elpidorou (2012). Where is My Mind? Mark Rowlands on the Vehicles of Cognition. Avant 3 (1):145-160.
    Do our minds extend beyond our brains? In a series of publications, Mark Rowlands has argued that the correct answer to this question is an affirmative one. According to Rowlands, certain types of operations on bodily and worldly structures should be considered to be proper and literal parts of our cognitive and mental processes. In this article, I present and critically evaluate Rowlands' position.
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  6. Matthew Elton (1997). Cognitive Success and Exam Preparation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (1):72-73.
    Evolution is not like an exam in which pre-set problems need to be solved. Failing to recognise this point, Clark & Thornton misconstrue the type of explanation called for in species learning although, clearly, species that can trade spaces have more chances to discover novel beneficial behaviours. On the other hand, the trading spaces strategy might help to explain lifetime learning successes.
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  7. Christina E. Erneling & D. Johnson (eds.) (2005). Mind As a Scientific Object. Oxford University Press.
  8. Jonathan St B. T. Evans (2009). Does Rational Analysis Stand Up to Rational Analysis? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (1):88-89.
    I agree with Oaksford & Chater (O&C) that human beings resemble Bayesian reasoners much more closely than ones engaging standard logic. However, I have many problems with their framework, which appears to be rooted in normative rather than ecological rationality. The authors also overstate everyday rationality and neglect to account for much relevant psychological work on reasoning.
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  9. Jonathan St B. T. Evans & David E. Over (2002). The Role of Language in the Dual Process Theory of Thinking. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (6):684-685.
    Carruthers’proposals would seem to implicate language in what is known as System 2 thinking (explicit) rather than System 1 thinking (implicit) in contemporary dual process theories of thinking and reasoning. We provide outline description of these theories and show that while Carruthers’characterization of non-verbal processes as domain-specific identifies one critical feature of System 1 thinking, he appears to overlook the fact that much cognition of this type results from domain-general learning processes. We also review cognitive psychological evidence that shows that (...)
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  10. Jonathan St BT Evans (2010). Thinking Twice: Two Minds in One Brain. OUP Oxford.
    Common sense would suggest that we are in complete control of the actions we perform - that all our actions are the result of considered and conscious preparation. Yet, there are countless examples of this control breaking down, for example, in the case of phobias and compulsive actions. We can all recall those times when, in the 'heat of the moment', our actions have been very different to those that would have resulted from calm and considered reflection. In extreme moments (...)
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  11. Horacio Fabrega Jr (2005). Biological Evolution of Cognition and Culture: Off Arbib's Mirror-Neuron System Stage? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):131-132.
    Arbib offers a comprehensive, elegant formulation of brain/language evolution; with significant implications for social as well as biological sciences. Important psychological antecedents and later correlates are presupposed; their conceptual enrichment through protosign and protospeech is abbreviated in favor of practical communication. What culture “is” and whether protosign and protospeech involve a protoculture are not considered. Arbib also avoids dealing with the question of evolution of mind, consciousness, and self.
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  12. Edmund Fantino & Stephanie Stolarz-Fantino (2010). Grandparental Altruism: Expanding the Sense of Cause and Effect. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (1):22-23.
    Grandparental altruism may be partially understood in the same way as other instances of altruism. Acts of altruism often occur in a context in which the actor has a broader sense of cause and effect than is evident in more typical behavioral interactions where cause and effect appear relatively transparent. Many believe that good deeds will ultimately produce good results.
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  13. Aurelio José Figueredo, Jon A. Sefcek & Sally G. Olderbak (2009). Attachment and Life History Strategy. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (1):26-27.
    Del Giudice addresses a complex and pertinent theoretical issue: the evolutionary adaptiveness of sex differences in attachment styles in relation to life history strategy. Although we applaud Del Giudice for calling attention to the problem, we regret that he does not sufficiently specify how attachment styles serve as an integral part of a coordinate life history strategy for either sex.
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  14. W. Tecumseh Fitch, Marc Hauser, Chomsky D. & Noam (2005). The Evolution of the Language Faculty: Clarifications and Implications. Cognition 97:179-210.
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  15. Keith Frankish (2010). Evolving the Linguistic Mind. Linguistic and Philosophical Investigations 9:206-214.
  16. Ben Fraser (2013). False Advertising in Biological Markets: Partner Choice and the Problem of Reliability. In K. Sterelny, R. Joyce, B. Calcott & B. Fraser (eds.), Cooperation and its Evolution. MIT Press.
    The partner choice approach to understanding the evolution of cooperation builds on approaches that focus on partner control by considering processes that occur prior to pair or group formation. Proponents of the partner choice approach rightly note that competition to be chosen as a partner can help solve the puzzle of cooperation. I aim to build on the partner choice approach by considering the role of signalling in partner choice. Partnership formation often requires reliable information. Signalling is thus important in (...)
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  17. Debra Friedman & Michael Hechter (2010). Motivating Grandparental Investment. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (1):24-25.
    What makes the question of grandparental investment so very interesting is trying to tease out the underlying motivations. Grandparental investment is variable and grandparental altruism, if it exists at all, is also variable. Neither evolutionary theory nor rational choice theory has an easy time explaining this variation, and insight is further impeded by the absence of any compelling empirical studies designed for the purpose of testing alternative explanations of variations in grandparental investment.
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  18. Shaun Gallagher, Movement and Expression in the Development of Social Cognition.
    What kind of movement or behavior is involved in neonate imitation? What exactly is the newborn infant doing when it responds to seeing gestures on another person's face? This question is closely related to some other questions, such as whether neonate imitation is possible, and whether it is truly imitation. Piaget, of course, thought that this sort of "invisible imitation" was not possible for infants less than 8-12 months of age.
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  19. Shaun Gallagher (2008). Inference or Interaction: Social Cognition Without Precursors. Philosophical Explorations 11 (3):163 – 174.
    In this paper I defend interaction theory (IT) as an alternative to both theory theory (TT) and simulation theory (ST). IT opposes the basic suppositions that both TT and ST depend upon. I argue that the various capacities for primary and secondary intersubjectivity found in infancy and early childhood should not be thought of as precursors to later developing capacities for using folk psychology or simulation routines. They are not replaced or displaced by such capacities in adulthood, but rather continue (...)
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  20. Peter Gärdenfors (2006). How Homo Became Sapiens: On the Evolution of Thinking. OUP Oxford.
    Our ability to think is one of our most puzzling characteristics. What it would be like to be unable to think? What would it be like to lack self-awareness? The complexity of this activity is striking. Thinking involves the interaction of a range of mental processes - attention, emotion, memory, planning, self-consciousness, free will, and language. So where did these processes arise? What evolutionary advantages were bestowed upon those with an ability to deceive, to plan, to empathize, or to understand (...)
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  21. Peter Gardenfors (2004). Does Evolution Provide a Key to the Scientific Study of Mind? The Detachment of Thought. In Christina E. Erneling & David Martel Johnson (eds.), Mind As a Scientific Object. Oxford University Press.
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  22. Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.) (2004). The Cognitive Neurosciences III. MIT Press.
    "The Cognitive Neurosciences III is a magnificent accomplishment. It covers topics trom ions to consciousness, from reflexes to social psychology. ...
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  23. Jacques Gervet, Alain Gallo, Raphael Chalmeau & Muriel Soleilhavoup (1996). Some Prerequisites for a Study of the Evolution of Cognition in the Animal Kingdom. Acta Biotheoretica 44 (1).
    A distinction is made between two definitions of animal cognition: the one most frequently employed in cognitive sciences considers cognition as extracting and processing information; a more phenomenologically inspired model considers it as attributing to a form of the outside world a significance, linked to the state of the animal. The respective fields of validity of these two models are discussed along with the limitations they entail, and the questions they pose to evolutionary biologists are emphasized. This is followed by (...)
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  24. Marco Giudicdele (2009). Human Reproductive Strategies: An Emerging Synthesis? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (1):45-67.
  25. Peter Godfrey-Smith (2005). Untangling the Evolution of Mental Representation. In António Zilhão (ed.), Evolution, Rationality, and Cognition: A Cognitive Science for the Twenty-First Century. Routledge.
    The "tangle" referred to in my title is a special set of problems that arise in understanding the evolution of mental representation. These are problems over and above those involved in reconstructing evolutionary histories in general, over and above those involved in dealing with human evolution, and even over and above those involved in tackling the evolution of other human psychological traits. I am talking about a peculiar and troublesome set of interactions and possibilities, linked to long-standing debates about the (...)
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  26. Peter Godfrey-Smith (2002). Environmental Complexity and the Evolution of Cognition. In Robert J. Sternberg & J. Kaufman (eds.), The Evolution of Intelligence. Lawrence Erlbaum. 233--249.
    One problem faced in discussions of the evolution of intelligence is the need to get a precise fix on what is to be explained. Terms like "intelligence," "cognition" and "mind" do not have simple and agreed-upon meanings, and the differences between conceptions of intelligence have consequences for evolutionary explanation. I hope the papers in this volume will enable us to make progress on this problem. The present contribution is mostly focused on these basic and foundational issues, although the last section (...)
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  27. Peter Godfrey-Smith (2002). On the Evolution of Representational and Interpretive Capacities. The Monist 85 (1):50-69.
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  28. Peter Godfrey-Smith (1996). Complexity and the Function of Mind in Nature. Cambridge University Press.
    This book explains the relationship between intelligence and environmental complexity, and in so doing links philosophy of mind to more general issues about the relations between organisms and environments, and to the general pattern of 'externalist' explanations. The author provides a biological approach to the investigation of mind and cognition in nature. In particular he explores the idea that the function of cognition is to enable agents to deal with environmental complexity. The history of the idea in the work of (...)
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  29. Marion Godman (2013). Why We Do Things Together: The Social Motivation for Joint Action. Philosophical Psychology 26 (4):588-603.
    Joint action is a growing field of research, spanning across the cognitive, behavioral, and brain sciences as well as receiving considerable attention amongst philosophers. I argue that there has been a significant oversight within this field concerning the possibility that many joint actions are driven, at least in part, by agents' social motivations rather than merely by their shared intentions. Social motivations are not directly related to the (joint) target goal of the action. Instead, when agents are mutually socially motivated (...)
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  30. Mark Greenberg (2004). Goals Versus Memes: Explanation in the Theory of Cultural Evolution. In Susan L. Hurley & Nick Chater (eds.), Perspectives on Imitation. MIT Press.
    Darwinian theories of culture need to show that they improve upon the commonsense view that cultural change is explained by humans? skillful pursuit of their conscious goals. In order for meme theory to pull its weight, it is not enough to show that the development and spread of an idea is, broadly speaking, Darwinian, in the sense that it proceeds by the accumulation of change through the differential survival and transmission of varying elements. It could still be the case that (...)
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  31. Walter B. Gulick (2006). Signals, Schemas, Subsidiaries, and Skills. Tradition and Discovery 33 (3):44-62.
    This essay examines Michael Polanyi’s notion of tacit knowing and seeks to clarify and elaborate upon its claims. Tacit knowing, which is conscious although inarticulate, must be distinguished from tacit processes, which are largely unconscious. Schematization is explored as a primary tacit process that humans share with all animals. This tacit process organizes and secures, in long-term memory, information of interest provided by receptors and those learned skifls conducive to survival. Human empirical knowing integrates schematized subsidiaries info articulate explicitness through (...)
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  32. Raymond Hames (2010). Grandparental Transfers and Kin Selection. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (1):26-27.
    In the analysis of intergenerational transfer, several improvements can be made. First, following kin selection theory, grandparents have kin other than grandchildren in which to invest and therefore any investigation into grandparents should take this perspective. Secondly, how transfers actually enhance the survivorship of younger relatives such as grandchildren must be better measured, especially in the ethnographic literature. Finally, the problem of indirect investments or targeting must be considered.
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  33. Valerie Gray Hardcastle (1999). Where Biology Meets Psychology: Philosophical Essays. MIT Press.
    This book is perhaps the first to open a dialogue between the two disciplines.
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  34. Marc D. Hauser & Elizabeth Spelke (2004). Evolutionary and Developmental Foundations of Human Knowledge. In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The Cognitive Neurosciences Iii. Mit Press.
    What are the brain and cognitive systems that allow humans to play baseball, compute square roots, cook soufflés, or navigate the Tokyo subways? It may seem that studies of human infants and of non-human animals will tell us little about these abilities, because only educated, enculturated human adults engage in organized games, formal mathematics, gourmet cooking, or map-reading. In this chapter, we argue against this seemingly sensible conclusion. When human adults exhibit complex, uniquely human, culture-specific skills, they draw on a (...)
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  35. Thomas T. Hills (2011). The Evolutionary Origins of Cognitive Control. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (2):231-237.
    The question of domain-specific versus domain-general processing is an ongoing source of inquiry surrounding cognitive control. Using a comparative evolutionary approach, Stout (2010) proposed two components of cognitive control: coordinating hierarchical action plans and social cognition. This article reports additional molecular and experimental evidence supporting a domain-general attentional process coordinating hierarchical action plans, with the earliest such control processing originating in the capacity of dynamic foraging behaviors—predating the vertebrate-invertebrate divergence (c. 700 million years ago). Further discussion addresses evidence required for (...)
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  36. Douglas L. Hintzman (2008). Recursive Reminding and Children's Concepts of Number. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (6):656-657.
    According to the recursive reminding hypothesis, repetition interacts with episodic memory to produce memory representations that encode experiences of reminding. These representations provide the rememberer with a basis for differentiating among the first time something happens, the second time it happens, and so on. I argue that such representations could mediate children's understanding of natural number.
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  37. Christopher Hitchcock (ed.) (2004). Contemporary Debates in Philosophy of Science. Blackwell Pub..
    Showcasing original arguments for well-defined positions, as well as clear and concise statements of sophisticated philosophical views, this volume is an ...
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  38. J. Hodges & Gregory Radick (eds.) (2003). The Cambridge Companion to Darwin. Cambridge University Press.
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  39. V. Hoesle & C. Illies (eds.) (2005). Darwin and Philosophy. Notre Dame University Press.
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  40. Henkjan Honing & Annemie Ploeger (2012). Cognition and the Evolution of Music: Pitfalls and Prospects. Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (4):513-524.
    What was the role of music in the evolutionary history of human beings? We address this question from the point of view that musicality can be defined as a cognitive trait. Although it has been argued that we will never know how cognitive traits evolved (Lewontin, 1998), we argue that we may know the evolution of music by investigating the fundamental cognitive mechanisms of musicality, for example, relative pitch, tonal encoding of pitch, and beat induction. In addition, we show that (...)
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  41. Christiane A. Hoppmann & Petra L. Klumb (2010). Grandparental Investment Facilitates Harmonization of Work and Family in Employed Parents: A Lifespan Psychological Perspective. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (1):27-28.
    The target article emphasizes the need to identify psychological mechanisms underlying grandparental investment, particularly in low-risk family contexts. We extend this approach by addressing the changing demands of balancing work and family in low-risk families. Taking a lifespan psychological perspective, we identify additional motivators and potential benefits of grandparental investment for grandparents themselves and for subsequent generations.
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  42. Dieneke Hubbeling (2013). Maladapting Minds: Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Evolutionary Theory. Philosophical Psychology 26 (6):932 - 936.
  43. Brad R. Huber (2010). Continuity Between Pre- and Post-Demographic Transition Populations with Respect to Grandparental Investment. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (1):28-29.
    This commentary suggests that there is more continuity in pre- and post-demographic transition populations with respect to grandparental investments than is assumed by Coall & Hertwig (C&H). Recent research employing high-quality data supports the claim that sex-biased grandparental investments are likely to exist in industrialized societies, and that the economic status of grandparents is related to their long-term fitness.
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  44. N. Humphrey (2003). The Inner Eye: Social Intelligence in Evolution. Oxford University Press.
    Easy to read, adorned with Mel Calman's brilliant illustrations, passionately argued, yet never less than scientifically profound, this book remains the...
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  45. N. Humphrey (2003). The Mind Made Flesh: Essays From the Frontiers of Psychology and Evolution. Oxford University Press.
    Nicholas Humphrey's writings about the evolution of the mind have done much to set the agenda for contemporary psychology.
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  46. Susan L. Hurley & Nick Chater (eds.) (2004). Perspectives on Imitation. MIT Press.
    These volumes provide a resource that makes this research accessible across disciplines and clarifies its importance for the social sciences and philosophy as ...
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  47. Marcus Hutter (2012). Can Intelligence Explode? Journal of Consciousness Studies 19 (1-2):143-166.
    The technological singularity refers to a hypothetical scenario in which technological advances virtually explode. The most popular scenario is the creation of super-intelligent algorithms that recursively create ever higher intelligences. It took many decades for these ideas to spread from science fiction to popular science magazines and finally to attract the attention of serious philosophers. David Chalmers' (JCS 2010) article is the first comprehensive philosophical analysis of the singularity in a respected philosophy journal. The motivation of my article is to (...)
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  48. David Martel Johnson (1988). Brutes Believe Not. Philosophical Psychology 1 (3):279-294.
    Abstract Is it plausible to claim (some) non?human animals have beliefs, on the (non?behaviourist) assumption that believing is or involves subjects? engaging in practical reasoning which takes account of meanings? Some answer Yes, on the ground that evolutionary continuities linking humans with other animals must include psychological ones. But (1) evolution does not operate?even primarily?by means of continuities. Thus species, no matter how closely related (in fact, sometimes even conspecifics) operate with very different adaptive ?tricks'; and it is plausible to (...)
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  49. Min Ju Kang & Michael Glassman (2009). Attachment Patterns of Homeless Youth: Choices of Stress and Confusion. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (1):32-33.
    This commentary explores the reproductive strategies and attachment patterns among homeless youths. Del Giudice's integrated evolutionary model is applied to a homeless youth population that must function in ecological settings of constant high risk and stress. Different reproductive needs result in different patterns of high-risk behaviors. Intervention considering the sex differences, life history, and early caregiver–child relationships is suggested.
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  50. Jonas T. Kaplan & Marco Iacoboni (2005). Listen to My Actions! Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):135-136.
    We believe that an account of the role of mirror neurons in language evolution should involve a greater emphasis on the auditory properties of these neurons. Mirror neurons in premotor cortex which respond to the visual and auditory consequences of actions allow for a modality-independent and agent-independent coding of actions, which may have been important for the emergence of language.
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