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  1. Colin Allen (1992). Mental Content and Evolutionary Explanation. Biology and Philosophy 7 (1):1-12.
    Cognitive ethology is the comparative study of animal cognition from an evolutionary perspective. As a sub-discipline of biology it shares interest in questions concerning the immediate causes and development of behavior. As a part of ethology it is also concerned with questions about the function and evolution of behavior. I examine some recent work in cognitive ethology, and I argue that the notions of mental content and representation are important to enable researchers to answer questions and state generalizations about the (...)
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  2. John Tooby Colin Allen (1996). The Evolution of Mind. In Garrison W. Cottrell (ed.), Proceedings of the Eighteenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Lawrence Erlbaum. 48.
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  3. Michael A. Arbib (2001). Co-Evolution of Human Consciousness and Language. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 929:195-220.
  4. P. Arhem & H. Liljenstrom (1997). On the Coevolution of Consciousness and Cognition. Journal of Theoretical Biology 187:601-12.
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  5. Peter Århem, Hans Liljenström & B. I. B. Lindahl (2002). Evolution of Consciousness: Report on the Agora Workshop in Sigtuna, Sweden, on 11-13 August 2001. Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (4):81-84.
    Report on the Agora Workshop, in Sigtuna, Sweden, on 11-3 August 2001, Agora for Biosystems, P.O. Box 57, SE-193 22 Sigtuna, Sweden.
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  6. Robert Arp (2013). The Evolution of Scenario Visualization and the Early Hominin Mind. In Liz Swan (ed.), Origins of Mind. 143--159.
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  7. Robert Artigiani (1988). Scientific Revolution and the Evolution of Consciousness. World Futures 25 (3):237-281.
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  8. James Mark Baldwin (1896). Consciousness and Evolution. American Naturalist.
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  9. H. B. Barlow (1987). The Biological Role of Consciousness. In Colin Blakemore & Susan A. Greenfield (eds.), Mindwaves. Blackwell.
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  10. H. B. Barlow (1980). Nature's Joke: A Conjecture on the Biological Role of Consciousness. In Brian Josephson & V. Ramach (eds.), Consciousness and the Physical World. Pergamon Press.
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  11. Ansgar Beckermann (2010). Darwin – What If Man is Only an Animal, After All? Dialectica 64 (4):467-482.
    According to Darwin, humans, just like other organisms, are not created by any special act. All organisms arise by natural processes from inanimate matter. Humans are no exception. But can it really be the case that even humans are ‘only’ animals – natural beings which (a) are completely made up of natural parts (in the end, of macro-molecules which themselves consist of atoms), and for which it is (b) true that all processes that occur within them are physico-chemical processes? In (...)
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  12. Jesse M. Bering & Dave Bjorklund (2007). The Serpent's Gift: Evolutionary Psychology and Consciousness. In Philip David Zelazo, Morris Moscovitch & Evan Thompson (eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Consciousness. Cambridge.
  13. Jesse M. Bering & Todd K. Shackelford (2004). The Causal Role of Consciousness: A Conceptual Addendum to Human Evolutionary Psychology. Review of General Psychology 8 (4):227-248.
  14. Jerome S. Bernstein (2005). Living in the Borderland: The Evolution of Consciousness and the Challenge of Healing Trauma. Brunner-Routledge.
    Living in the Borderland addresses the evolution of Western consciousness and describes the emergence of the 'Borderland,' a spectrum of reality that is beyond the rational yet is palpable to an increasing number of individuals. Building on Jungian theory, Jerome Bernstein argues that a greater openness to transrational reality experienced by Borderland personalities allows new possibilities for understanding and healing confounding clinical and developmental enigmas. In three sections, this book charts the evolution of Western consciousness, examines the psychological and clinical (...)
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  15. Martin A. Bertman (1978). "Interfaces of the Word: Studies in the Evolution of Consciousness and Society," by Walter J. Ong, S.J. Modern Schoolman 55 (4):414-416.
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  16. Colin Blakemore & Susan A. Greenfield (1987). Mindwaves: Thoughts on Intelligence, Identity, and Consciousness. Blackwell.
  17. Bruce Bridgeman (1992). On the Evolution of Consciousness and Language. Psycoloquy 3 (15).
    Psychology can be based on plans, internally held images of achievement that organize the stimulus-response links of traditional psychology. The hierarchical structure of plans must be produced, held, assigned priorities, and monitored. Consciousness is the operation of the plan-executing mechanism, enabling behavior to be driven by plans rather than immediate environmental contingencies. The mechanism unpacks a single internally held idea into a series of actions. New in this paper is the proposal that language uses this mechanism for communication, unpacking an (...)
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  18. Selmer Bringsjord & Ron Noel (2002). Why Did Evolution Engineer Consciousness? In James H. Fetzer (ed.), Consciousness Evolving. John Benjamins.
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  19. J. Brockman (ed.) (1998). The Reality Club, Vol. III. Prentice-Hall.
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  20. John Brockman (ed.) (2006). Intelligent Thought: Science Versus the Intelligent Design Movement. Vintage.
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  21. Irina-Gabriela Buda (2009). Consciousness and Evolution. Forum Philosophicum: International Journal for Philosophy 14 (2).
    I analyse some of the key evolutionary issues that arise in the study of consciousness from a bio-philosophical point of view. They all seem to be related to the fact that phenomenality has a special status: it is a very complex feature, apparently more than biological, it is hard to define because of the plurality of its displays and it is difficult to study with classic evolutionary tools . Giving an answer to the question "is consciousness an adaptive trait?" thus (...)
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  22. Ann B. Butler, Paul R. Manger, B. I. B. Lindahl & Peter Århem (2005). Evolution of the Neural Basis of Consciousness: A Bird-Mammal Comparison. Bioessays 27 (9):923-936.
    The main objective of this essay is to validate some of the principal, currently competing, mammalian consciousness-brain theories by comparing these theories with data on both cognitive abilities and brain organization in birds. Our argument is that, given that multiple complex cognitive functions are correlated with presumed consciousness in mammals, this correlation holds for birds as well. Thus, the neuroanatomical features of the forebrain common to both birds and mammals may be those that are crucial to the generation of both (...)
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  23. A. G. Cairns-Smith (1996). Evolving the Mind: On the Nature of Matter and the Origin of Consciousness. Cambridge University Press.
    Evolving the Mind has two main themes: how ideas about the mind evolved in science; and how the mind itself evolved in nature. The mind came into physical science when it was realised, first, that it is the activity of a physical object, a brain, which makes a mind; and secondly, that our theories of nature are largely mental constructions, artificial extensions of an inner model of the world which we inherited from our distant ancestors. From both of these perspectives, (...)
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  24. William Calvin, The Evolution of Consciousness.
    I will actually talk mostly about evolutionary processes in the brain as we think about what to say next; I'll be happy to answer questions later, however, about how this system we call consciousness itself evolved on the usual evolutionary time scale of the ice ages.
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  25. William H. Calvin (1991). The Ascent of Mind: Ice Age Climates and the Evolution of Intelligence. Bantam Books.
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  26. Peter Carruthers (2000). The Evolution of Consciousness. In Peter Carruthers & A. Chamberlain (eds.), Evolution and the Human Mind. Cambridge University Press. 254.
    How might consciousness have evolved? Unfortunately for the prospects of providing a convincing answer to this question, there is no agreed account of what consciousness is. So any attempt at an answer will have to fragment along a number of different lines of enquiry. More fortunately, perhaps, there is general agreement that a number of distinct notions of consciousness need to be distinguished from one another; and there is also broad agreement as to which of these is particularly problematic - (...)
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  27. Peter Carruthers & A. Chamberlain (eds.) (2000). Evolution and the Human Mind. Cambridge University Press.
    This volume of essays offers an interdisciplinary examination of the evolution of the human mind.
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  28. Stephen R. L. Clark (2002). Nothing Without Mind. In James H. Fetzer (ed.), Consciousness Evolving. John Benjamins.
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  29. R. W. Coan (1989). Alternative Views on the Evolution of Consciousness. Journal of Human Psychology 29:167-99.
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  30. A. Combs & S. Krippner (1999). Spiritual Growth and the Evolution of Consciousness: Complexity, Evolution, and the Farther Reaches of Human Nature. International Journal of Transpersonal Studies 18 (1):9-19.
    The question of whether evolutionary theories provide a useful approach to investigating the highest potentials of human consciousness and spiritual growth is addressed. Finding one-dimensional models overly simplistic, we have proposed a three-level model in which "states of mind" , "states of consciousness" , and "structures of consciousness" share a hierarchical relationship. States of consciousness contextualize various states of mind and structures of consciousness contextualize states of consciousness. Our model draws upon the "grand evolutionary synthesis," a phrase used in some (...)
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  31. Allan Combs (1996). The Radiance of Being: Complexity, Chaos, and the Evolution of Consciousness. Paragon House.
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  32. Allan Combs (1993). The Evolution of Consciousness: A Theory of Historical and Personal Transformation. World Futures 38 (1):43-62.
    (1993). The Evolution of consciousness: A theory of Historical and personal transformation. World Futures: Vol. 38, Theoretical Achievements and Practical Applications of General Evolutionary Theory, pp. 43-62.
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  33. Allan Combs & Sally Goerner (1997). The Evolution of Consciousness as a Self-Organizing Information System in the Society of Other Such Systems. World Futures 50 (1):609-616.
    (1997). The evolution of consciousness as a self‐organizing information system in the society of other such systems. World Futures: Vol. 50, No. 1-4, pp. 609-616.
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  34. Michael C. Corballis (2007). The Evolution of Consciousness. In Philip David Zelazo, Morris Moscovitch & Evan Thompson (eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Consciousness. Cambridge. 571--595.
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  35. Rodney M. J. Cotterill (2001). Evolution, Cognition and Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 8 (2):3-17.
    It is suggested that the evolutionary advantage of consciousness lies in its mediating the acquisition of novel context-specific reflexes, particularly when the context has temporally varying components. Such acquisition is conjectured to require evaluation of feedback stimuli evoked by the animal's self-paced probing of its environment, or by memories of the outcome of previous such probings, and the evaluation is postulated to be predicated on attention. It is argued that such an approach automatically incorporates sensation into the phenomenon, sensation arising (...)
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  36. Rodney M. J. Cotterill (2000). Did Consciousness Evolve From Self-Paced Probing of the Environment, and Not From Reflexes? Brain and Mind 1 (2):283-298.
    It is suggested that the anatomical structures whichmediate consciousness evolved as decisiveembellishments to a (non-conscious) design strategypresent even in the simplest monocellular organisms.Consciousness is thus not the pinnacle of ahierarchy whose base is the primitive reflex, becausereflexes require a nervous system, which the monocelldoes not possess. By postulating that consciousness isintimately connected to self-paced probing of theenvironment, also prominent in prokaryotic behavior,one can make mammalian neuroanatomy amenable todramatically simple rationalization.
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  37. J. H. Crook (1980). The Evolution of Human Consciousness. Oxford University Press.
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  38. Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi (2004). Materialism and the Evolution of Consciousness. In Tim Kasser & Allen D. Kanner (eds.), Psychology and Consumer Culture: The Struggle for a Good Life in a Materialistic World. American Psychological Association. 91-106.
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  39. Daniel C. Dennett (1988). The Evolution of Consciousness. In J. Brockman (ed.), The Reality Club, Vol. Iii. Prentice-Hall. 3--99.
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  40. Daniel C. Dennett (1986). Julian Jaynes' Software Archaeology. Canadian Psychology 27:149-54.
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  41. L. Dewart (1989). Evolution and Consciousness: The Role of Speech in the Origin and Development of Human Nature. University of Toronto Press.
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  42. Matthew Donald (1995). The Neurobiology of Human Consciousness: An Evolutionary Approach. Neuropsychologia 33:1087-1102.
  43. Merlin Donald (2001). A Mind So Rare: The Evolution of Human Consciousness. W.W. Norton.
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  44. Joseph E. Earley (2002). The Social Evolution of Consciousness. Journal of Humanistic Psychology 42 (1):107-132.
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  45. John C. Eccles (1992). Evolution of Consciousness. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Usa 89:7320-24.
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  46. John C. Eccles (1990). Evolution of the Brain: Creation of the Self. New York: Routledge.
    Sir John Eccles, a distinguished scientist and Nobel Prize winner who has devoted his scientific life to the study of the mammalian brain, tells the story of...
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  47. John C. Eccles (ed.) (1978). Mind and Brain. Paragon House.
  48. David B. Edelman (2007). Consciousness Without Corticocentrism: Beating an Evolutionary Path. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (1):91-92.
    Merker's approach allows the formulation of an evolutionary view of consciousness that abandons a dependence on structural homology – in this case, the presence of a cerebral cortex – in favor of functional concordance. In contrast to Merker, though, I maintain that the emergence of complex, dynamic interactions, such as those which occur between thalamus and cortex, was central to the appearance of consciousness. (Published Online May 1 2007).
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  49. Chad Engelland (forthcoming). Heidegger and the Human Difference. Journal of the American Philosophical Association 1.
  50. James H. Fetzer (ed.) (2002). Consciousness Evolving. John Benjamins.
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