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  1. Peter Achinstein (1983). The Nature of Explanation. Oxford University Press.
    Offering a new approach to scientific explanation, this book focuses initially on the explaining act itself.
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  2. Hans Albert (1993). Some Remarks on Reasons in Explaining Human Action. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 7 (1):25 – 27.
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  3. Peter Alexander (1963/1992). Sensationalism And Scientific Explanation. Humanities Press.
    SENSATIONALISM 1 1. Introductory 1 2. Mach's Sensationalism 4 3. Developments of Sensationalism 22 II. THE INHERENT WEAKNESS OF SEN- SATIONALISM 25 1. The Point of Sensationalism 25 2. The Ambiguity of 'Sensation' 27 3. The Fundamental Conflict 35 4. Mistakes, Incorrigibility and Simplicity 40 III. DESCRIPTION 51 1. Describing and Descriptions 51 2. Describing in Terms of Sensations 67 IV. THE POSSIBILITY OF 'PURE' DES- CRIPTIONS 79 V. SCIENTIFIC PROBLEMS 99 VI. DESCRIPTIONS AND EXPLANATIONS 111 BIBLIOGRAPHY 142 INDEX 145 (...)
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  4. Peter Alexander (1962). Rational Behaviour and Psychoanalytic Explanation. Mind 71 (283):326-341.
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  5. Maria Alvares (2013). Explaining Actions and Explaining Bodily Movements. In G. D’Oro, A. Laitinen & C. Sandis (eds.), Reasons and Causes. Palgrave Macmillan 141-159.
  6. Jaime Garcâia Alvarez & Rafael Lazcano Gonzâalez (1997). Homenaje Al Profesor Jaime Garc'ia Alvarez En Su 65 Aniversario.
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  7. Maria Alvarez (2013). Kinds of Reasons: An Essay in the Philosophy of Action. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Understanding human beings and their distinctive rational and volitional capacities is one of the central tasks of philosophy. The task requires a clear account of such things as reasons, desires, emotions and motives, and of how they combine to produce and explain human behaviour. In Kinds of Reasons, Maria Alvarez offers a fresh and incisive treatment of these issues, focusing in particular on reasons as they feature in contexts of agency. Her account builds on some important recent work in the (...)
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  8. Maria Alvarez (2010). Reasons for Action and Practical Reasoning. Ratio 23 (4):355-373.
    This paper seeks a better understanding of the elements of practical reasoning: premises and conclusion. It argues that the premises of practical reasoning do not normally include statements such as ‘I want to ϕ’; that the reasoning in practical reasoning is the same as in theoretical reasoning and that what makes it practical is, first, that the point of the relevant reasoning is given by the goal that the reasoner seeks to realize by means of that reasoning and the subsequent (...)
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  9. Lennart Åqvist (1989). On the Logic of Causally Necessary and Sufficient Conditions: Towards a Theory of Motive-Explanations of Human Actions. [REVIEW] Erkenntnis 31 (1):43 - 75.
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  10. Thomas Atwater (1980). Theory of Action. New Scholasticism 54 (1):111-115.
  11. Robert Audi (1980). Review: Tuomela on the Explanation of Human Action. [REVIEW] Synthese 44 (2):285 - 306.
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  12. Bruce Aune (1977). Reason and Action. --. Holland, Boston, D. Reidel Pub. Co.
  13. R. J. B. (1967). Explanation and Human Action. Review of Metaphysics 21 (1):161-161.
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  14. Archie J. Bahm (1967). R. Taylor's "Action and Purpose". [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 28 (2):290.
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  15. Annette Baier (1985). Explaining the Actions of the Explainers. Erkenntnis 22 (1-3):155 - 173.
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  16. Annette Baier (1979). Action Theory. Grazer Philosophische Studien 9:185-198.
  17. Annette Baier (1971). The Search for Basic Actions. American Philosophical Quarterly 8 (2):161 - 170.
  18. Kurt Baier (1965). Acting and Producing. Journal of Philosophy 62 (21):645-648.
  19. Hiranmoy Banerjee & Tirthanath Bandyopadhyay (eds.) (1990). Action: Explanation and Interpretation. K.P. Bagchi & Co. In Collaboration with Jadavpur University.
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  20. John A. Barker & Fred Adams (2012). Conclusive Reasons, Knowledge, and Action. Philosophical Issues 22 (1):35-52.
  21. Stephen Boulter (2009). Aquinas on Action and Action Explanation. In Constantine Sandis (ed.), New Essays on the Explanation of Action. Palgrave Macmillan
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  22. Myles Brand (1983). The Human Output System. Grazer Philosophische Studien 20:241-264.
    This paper recommends a framework for explaining largescale, complex actions. Philosophers have concentrated on simple actions — on hand raisings — far too long. Large-scale actions are the normal objects of legal and moral responsibility, as well as the kmd of activity for which the question of freedom is most pertinent. I focus on that part of the causal sequence constituting an action that begins after the decision and continues through the bodily movements: I call this part of the sequence (...)
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  23. Laurie Brown (1989). Discovering Alvarez: Selected Works of Luis W. Alvarez, with Commentary by His Students and Colleagues. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 22 (3):383-384.
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  24. John Brunero (2013). Reasons as Explanations. Philosophical Studies 165 (3):805-824.
    Can a normative reason be understood as a kind of explanation? I here consider and argue against two important analyses of reasons as explanations. John Broome argues that we can analyze reasons in terms of the concepts of explanation and ought. On his view, reasons to ϕ are either facts that explain why one ought to ϕ (what he calls “perfect reasons”) or facts that play a for-ϕ role in weighing explanations (what he calls “pro tanto reasons”). I argue against (...)
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  25. Ann Bumpus (2000). Aiming and Intending. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 30 (4):581-595.
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  26. Stephen Andrew Butterfill (2001). Two Kinds of Purposive Action. European Journal of Philosophy 9 (2):141–165.
    It is normally assumed that there is only one kind of purposive action. This article argues that there are two kinds of purposive action, which require different models of explanation. One kind of action is done without awareness of reasons; another kind of action is done because the agent is aware of reasons for that action. The argument starts by noting that philosophers disagree about what explains action. Some claim that actions are explained by impersonal facts, such as facts (...)
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  27. Norman Sydney Care (1964). Action, Explanation, and Understanding. Dissertation, Yale University
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  28. David Carr (2001). Place and Time: On the Interplay of Historical Points of View. History and Theory 40 (4):153–167.
    A historians account of a past action must take into account the agent's point of view, and that point of view may differ radically from that of the historian. This difference of points of view, I argue may extend to the very place and time of the action in question. In this paper, by exploring the spatial and temporal aspects of action, agency, and description of past action, I try to describe the interplay of points of view between historian and (...)
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  29. Peter Cataldo (1985). Actions. New Scholasticism 59 (2):244-245.
  30. David K. Chan (1995). Non-Intentional Actions. American Philosophical Quarterly 32 (2):139 - 151.
  31. Philip Clark (2014). Inescapability and the Analysis of Agency. Abstracta 7:3-15.
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  32. Randolph Clarke (1992). A Principle of Rational Explanation? Southern Journal of Philosophy 30 (3):1-12.
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  33. R. G. Collingwood (1999). The Principles of History: And Other Writings in Philosophy of History. Oxford University Press.
    Published here for the first time is much of a final and long-anticipated work on philosophy of history by the great Oxford philosopher and historian R. G. Collingwood. The original text of this uncompleted work has only recently been discovered. It is accompanied by further, shorter writings on historical knowledge and inquiry. A lengthy editorial introduction sets these writings in their context, and discusses philosophical questions to which they give rise.
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  34. J. Cottingham (2006). Review: The Will and Human Action From Antiquity to the Present Day. [REVIEW] Mind 115 (459):793-796.
  35. Giuseppina D'Oro (2000). Collingwood on Re-Enactment and the Identity of Thought. Journal of the History of Philosophy 38 (1):87-101.
  36. Jonathan Dancy (2009). Action, Content, and Inference. In P. M. S. Hacker, Hans-Johann Glock & John Hyman (eds.), Wittgenstein and Analytic Philosophy: Essays for P.M.S. Hacker. Oxford University Press
  37. Jonathan Dancy (2009). Action in Moral Metaphysics. In Constantine Sandis (ed.), New Essays on the Explanation of Action. Palgrave Macmillan
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  38. Arthur C. Danto (1979). Causality, Representations, and the Explanation of Actions. Tulane Studies in Philosophy 28:1-19.
  39. Donald Davidson (1970). Mental Events. In L. Foster & J. W. Swanson (eds.), Experience and Theory. Humanities Press 79-101.
  40. Ulrich Diehl (2012). Jaspers on Drives, Wants and Volitions. Jahrbuch der Österreichischen Karl-Jaspers-Gesellschaft 25:101-125.
    In § 6 of his General Psychopathology (1st edition 1913) Jaspers distinguished between drives, wants and volitions as three different and irreducible kinds of motivational phenomena which are involved in human decision making and which may lead to successful actions. He has characterized the qualitative differences between volitions in comparison with basic vital drives and emotional wants such as being (a.) intentional, (b.) content-specific and (b.) directed towards concrete objects and actions as goals. Furthermore, Jaspers has presented and discussed three (...)
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  41. Paul Joseph Dietl (1964). Explanation and Action: An Examination of the Controversy Between Hume and Some of His Contemporary Critics. Dissertation, Indiana University
  42. R. E. Dowling (1967). 'Can an Action Have Many Descriptions?'? Inquiry 10 (1-4):447-448.
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  43. William H. Dray (1979). Laws and Explanation in History. Greenwood Press.
  44. C. J. Ducasse (1925). Explanation, Mechanism, and Teleology. Journal of Philosophy 22 (6):150-155.
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  45. Antony Duff (1980). Desire, Duty and Moral Absolutes. Philosophy 55 (212):223 - 238.
    Philosophers have often claimed that the requirements of morality have an absolute and categorical status. Other values may be relative to the agent's ends, other imperatives hypothetical on his desires: their requirements must be justified by relating the action enjoined to the attainment of those ends or desires, and can be avoided by being shown to be incompatible with them. But the requirements of morality bind us whatever our ends or desires might be: they are not to be justified by (...)
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  46. Denis Dutton (1984). Understanding Human Action. Philosophical Books 25 (1):38-41.
  47. Paul Egré (forthcoming). Intentional Action and the Semantics of Gradable Expressions (On the Knobe Effect). In B. Copley & F. Martin (eds.), Causation in Grammatical Structures. Oxford University Press
    This paper examines an hypothesis put forward by Pettit and Knobe 2009 to account for the Knobe effect. According to Pettit and Knobe, one should look at the semantics of the adjective “intentional” on a par with that of other gradable adjectives such as “warm”, “rich” or “expensive”. What Pettit and Knobe’s analogy suggests is that the Knobe effect might be an instance of a much broader phenomenon which concerns the context-dependence of normative standards relevant for the application of gradable (...)
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  48. Carlos Moya Espí (1998). Reason and Causation in Davidson's Theory of Action Explanation. Critica 30 (89):29-43.
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  49. G. F. Schueler (2003). Reasons and Purposes: Human Rationality and the Teleological Explanation of Action. Oxford University Press Uk.
    People do things for reasons. But philosophers have disagreed sharply about how 'reasons explanations' of actions actually work and hence about their implications for human freedom and autonomy. The dominant view in contemporary philosophy is the idea that the beliefs and desires that constitute our reasons for acting simply cause us to act as we do.Fred Schueler seeks to replace such causal views, arguing that they leave out two essential elements of these explanations. Reasons explanations are inherently teleological in the (...)
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  50. Luca Ferrero (2009). Action. In John Shand (ed.), Central Issues of Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell 137-151.
1 — 50 / 309