Related categories
Siblings:History/traditions: Faith
641 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Order:
1 — 50 / 641
  1. G. A. (1961). Great Western Mystics. Review of Metaphysics 15 (1):189-189.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. R. A. (1955). Recovery of Faith. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 9 (2):363-363.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Raziel Abelson (1961). The Logic of Faith and Belief. In Sidney Hook (ed.), Religious Experience and Truth. [New York]New York University Press 116--129.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Robert Merrihew Adams (1990). The Knight of Faith. Faith and Philosophy 7 (4):383-395.
    The essay is about the “Preliminary Expectoration” of Kierkegaard’s Fear and Trembling. It argues that “the absurd” there refers primarily to the practical paradox that in faith (so it is claimed) one must simultaneously renounce and gladly accept a loved object. In other words it is about a problem of detachment as a feature of religious life. The paper goes on to interpret, and discuss critically, the views expressed in the book about both renunciation (infinite resignation) and the nature of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  5. Robert Merrihew Adams (1987). The Virtue of Faith and Other Essays in Philosophical Theology. Oxford University Press.
    Robert Merrihew Adams has been a leader in renewing philosophical respect for the idea that moral obligation may be founded on the commands of God. This collection of Adams' essays, two of which are previously unpublished, draws from his extensive writings on philosophical theology that discuss metaphysical, epistemological, and ethical issues surrounding the concept of God--whether God exists or not, what God is or would be like, and how we ought to relate ourselves to such a being. Adams studies the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   22 citations  
  6. Robert Merrihew Adams (1984). The Virtue of Faith. Faith and Philosophy 1 (1):3-15.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  7. Jonathan E. Adler (2005). William James and What Cannot Be Believed. The Harvard Review of Philosophy 13 (1):65-79.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  8. Hartley Burr Alexander (1938). The Faith That is America. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 19 (2):119.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Hartley Burr Alexander (1931). Truth and the Faith. Philosophical Review 40 (4):402-403.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Thomas M. Alexander (2013). John Dewey's Uncommon Faith. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 87 (2):347-362.
    Dewey’s A Common Faith has been variously interpreted, both in terms of its relation to Dewey’s corpus and internally in terms of its leading ideas. I argue for its crucial relevance in understanding Dewey and undertake an analysis of the key idea of “religious experience” as an “attitude of existence.” This distinguishes religious experience from other types of qualitative experience and shows the unique place this concept has for Dewey.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Norm R. Allen Jr (2003). This Far by Faith. Free Inquiry 23 (4).
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Tiina Allik (1990). Richard Viladesau: "Answering for Faith". [REVIEW] The Thomist 54 (1):176.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Henry E. Allison (1969). Faith and Falsifiability. Review of Metaphysics 22 (3):499 - 522.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  14. William P. Alston (1997). Faith and Criticism. Faith and Philosophy 14 (2):255-259.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. William P. Alston (1994). Swinburne on Faith and Belief.". In Alan G. Padgett (ed.), Reason and the Christian Religion. Clarendon
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. William P. Alston & Marcus B. Hester (eds.) (1992). Faith, Reason, and Skepticism: Essays. Temple University Press.
    INTRODUCTION William Alston opens this dialogue on faith, reason, and skepticism by arguing that if the belief-forming processes of a typical Christian are ...
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  17. Tyson Anderson (1973). Resurrection and Radical Faith. Religious Studies 9 (2):171 - 180.
    In The Historian and the Believer Van Harvey advances the opinion that belief in the resurrection of Jesus is not necessary for radical faith in God. He supports this idea by trying to establish two things: that radical faith has no clear relation to any remote historical event, and that the idea of a resurrection of Jesus is either incredible or meaningless . I want to argue that these last two contentions are false, and that in certain quite ordinary circumstances—such (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. Maria Rosa Antognazza (2011). The Conformity of Faith with Reason in the “Discours Préliminaire” of the Theodicy. In Paul Rateau (ed.), Lectures et interprétations des Essais de théodicée de G. W. Leibniz. [Studia Leibnitiana Sonderhefte 40]. Steiner 231-245.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. Richard Askew (1988). On Fideism and Alvin Plantinga. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 23 (1):3 - 16.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  20. David Attfield (1994). Fowler's Faith Development Christian Perspectives on Faith Development. Journal of Philosophy of Education 28 (2):267–274.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. Robert Audi (2013). Rationality and Religious Commitment: An Inquiry Into Faith and Reason. Heythrop Journal 54 (2):312-315.
    Can it be rational to be religious? Robert Audi gives a persuasive positive answer through an account of rationality and a rich, nuanced understanding of what religious commitment means. It is not just a matter of belief, but of emotions and attitudes such as faith and hope, of one's outlook on the world, and of commitment to live in certain ways.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Robert Audi (2011). Faith, Faithfulness, and Virtue. Faith and Philosophy 28 (3):294-309.
    The concept of faith is central in the philosophy of religion, and the concept of virtue is central in ethics. Both can be clarified by exploring their relationshipswith each other and their connection with conduct, reasons for action, and the good. One important question is whether faith is a virtue. Answering this requires at least a partial account of what constitutes faith and of what makes a characteristic a virtue. The answer also depends on whether we are speaking of religious (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. Robert Audi (2008). Belief, Faith, and Acceptance. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 63 (1/3):87 - 102.
    Belief is a central focus of inquiry in the philosophy of religion and indeed in the field of religion itself. No one conception of belief is central in all these cases, and sometimes the term 'belief' is used where 'faith' or 'acceptance' would better express what is intended. This paper sketches the major concepts in the philosophy of religion that are expressed by these three terms. In doing so, it distinguishes propositional belief (belief that) from both objectual belief (believing something (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  24. Robert Audi (1991). Faith, Belief, and Rationality. Philosophical Perspectives 5:213-239.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  25. Yuval Avnur (2012). Mere Faith and Entitlement. Synthese 189 (2):297-315.
    The scandal to philosophy and human reason, wrote Kant, is that we must take the existence of material objects on mere faith . In contrast, the skeptical paradox that has scandalized recent philosophy is not formulated in terms of faith, but rather in terms of justification, warrant, and entitlement. I argue that most contemporary approaches to the paradox (both dogmatist/liberal and default/conservative) do not address the traditional problem that scandalized Kant, and that the status of having a warrant (or justification) (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. Guy Axtell (2006). Blind Man's Bluff: Examining the Basic Belief Apologetic. Philosophical Studies 130 (1):131--152.
    Today we find philosophical naturalists and Christian theists both expressing an interest in virtue epistemology, while starting out from vastly different assumptions. What can be done to increase fruitful dialogue among these divergent groups of virtue-theoretic thinkers? The primary aim of this paper is to uncover more substantial common ground for dialogue by wielding a double-edged critique of certain assumptions shared by `scientific' and `theistic' externalisms, assumptions that undermine proper attention to epistemic agency and responsibility. I employ a responsibilist virtue (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  27. B. M. B. (1972). The Erosion of Faith. Review of Metaphysics 25 (4):757-757.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. D. B. B. (1964). Belief and Faith. Review of Metaphysics 17 (3):481-481.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. F. E. B. (1960). Ways of Faith. Review of Metaphysics 14 (1):177-177.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. G. B. (1958). After Utopia, The Decline of Political Faith. Review of Metaphysics 11 (3):517-517.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. R. J. B. (1968). The Essence of Faith According to Luther. Review of Metaphysics 21 (4):749-750.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32. Julian Baggini (2003). Faith on Trial. Think 2 (4):81-84.
    Julian Baggini's inspector Gore is puzzled by Abraham's faith in God, which, Gore suspects, boils down to a form of mental illness.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Masoumeh Bahram (2011). A Comparative Study Of ‘Faith’ From Kierkegaard’s And Rumi’s Perspective. Transcendent Philosophy Journal 12:69-92.
    This paper analyses and compares the ideas of Kierkegaard and Rumion faith and love. After outlining the very divergent historicalcontexts in which these two thinkers set forth their ideas, the studythen identifies and explains the main and additional secondarykeywords related to the concepts of faith and love. This includes thethree stages of existentialism, as differently expressed by Kierkegaardand Rumi. The similarity in their thinking is described, as is also thedissimilarity in their lives, contexts and modes of contemplation.Finally, both the ideas (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. Richard Lee Baker (1988). By the Eyes of Faith Alone: Faith, Reason, and Design in David Hume's "Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion". Dissertation, The University of Texas at Austin
    In my dissertation, I try to solve the many philosophical and historical riddles that have swirled around Hume's Dialogues. ;The philosophical riddles concern the Argument from Design, and its general adequacy as an argument; the historical riddles concern Hume's own position on that Argument, as well as his position on religious belief in general. The latter have heretofore evaded solution because the Dialogues is a dramatic fiction in which Hume nowhere appears or announces his own beliefs. The former have proved (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Renford Bambrough (1992). Reason and Faith—I. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 31:23-32.
    What is the difference between reason and faith? The question is framed in what I would call ‘the treacherous singular’. The structure of the question implies a particular form of answer and makes other assumptions about notions that occur in the same region of our network of thoughts and understandings. If I were happy to play this game I might reply in kind by offering a simple formula purporting to sum up my own answers to the cluster of questions that (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. Judith A. Barad (1992). Consent the Means to an Active Faith According to St. Thomas Aquinas.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. Richard L. Barber (1953). Experience, Reason and Faith. Tulane Studies in Philosophy 2:25-37.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. Michael Barnwell (2009). De Casu Diaboli: An Examination of Faith and Reason Via a Discussion of the Devil’s Sin. Saint Anselm Journal 6 (2):1-8.
    Although De Casu Diaboli is not a traditional locus for a discussion of faith and reason, it is nonetheless subtly permeated by this topic in two ways. The first concerns Anselm’s general strategy for answering the student’s questions regarding the cause of the devil’s first sin. Anselm ends by claiming the devil willed incorrectly for no other cause than that his will so willed. Anselm thus ultimately calls upon the student to have faith in the mysterious, libertarian self-determining power of (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. D. C. Barrett (1988). Faith and the Existence of God: Faith and Rationality. Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 24:135-143.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. E. P. Barrow (1907). Trust, Faith, Belief, Creed. Hibbert Journal 6:425.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. J. D. Bastable (1965). Belief and Faith. Philosophical Studies 14:254-256.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. Terence James Bateman, Elements of the Prayer of St. Benedict as a Foundation for an Epistemology of Faith.
    A dynamic interpretation of the Prayer of St. Benedict provides a methodology for understanding and explicating Christian faith consistent with enduring elements in the theological tradition and meaningful to the contemporary milieu. Within the overarching structure of the Prayer as a meta-paradigm, are three subsidiary paradigms that describe characteristics of approaches to faith. The structure, content, and intention of the Prayer reveal these to be experiential, critical, and transcendental. Wisdom is asserted as integrating and orienting the discussion, which is a (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. Pierre Bayle (1963). The Great Contest of Faith and Reason. New York, Ungar.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44. James Beach (2014). John Bishop's Leaps of Faith: Doxastic Ventures and the Logical Equivalence of Religious Faith and Agnosticism. Religious Studies 50 (1):101-117.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. James Beach (2013). John Bishop's Leaps of Faith: Doxastic Ventures and the Logical Equivalence of Religious Faith and Agnosticism. Religious Studies 50 (1):1-17.
    In recent essays John Bishop proposes a model of religious faith. This author notices that a so-called doxastic venture model of theistic faith is self-defeating for the following reason: a venture suggests a process with an outcome; by definition a venture into Christian faith denies itself an outcome in virtue of the transcendent character of its claims – for what is claimed cannot be settled. Taking instruction from logical positivism, I stress the nonsensical character of religious claims while attacking Bishop's (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. Burnham P. Beckwith (1986). The Effect of Intelligence on Religious Faith. Free Inquiry 6:46-53.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47. James Beilby (2002). The Relationship Between Faith and Evidence in St. Augustine. Sophia 41 (1):19-32.
    There has been much debate in both theological and philosophical circles over the matter of evidentialism—that is, whether an individual must augment or supplement their belief in God with evidences supportive of that belief. However, what has been (for the most part) lacking is a discussion which endeavors to integrate theological and philosophical desiderata. In this paper I will suggest that the framework for such a discussion can be found in the work of St. Augustine—in particular, in the way he (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. Michael Bell (2008). Modes of Faith: Secular Surrogates for Lost Religious Belief. [REVIEW] Clio 38 (1):110-113.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. Piers Benn (2006). Is Atheism a Faith Position? Think 5 (13):25-34.
    In a recent issue of Think , Brenda Watson suggested that atheism is also a ‘faith position’. Here, Piers Benn looks more closely at this often-made suggestion.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50. Bruce Ellis Benson (2007). Pious Nietzsche: Decadence and Dionysian Faith. Indiana University Press.
    Bruce Ellis Benson puts forward the surprising idea that Nietzsche was never a godless nihilist, but was instead deeply religious. But how does Nietzsche affirm life and faith in the midst of decadence and decay? Benson looks carefully at Nietzsche's life history and views of three decadents, Socrates, Wagner, and Paul, to come to grips with his pietistic turn. Key to this understanding is Benson's interpretation of the powerful effect that Nietzsche thinks music has on the human spirit. Benson claims (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 641