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  1. Robert Merrihew Adams (1990). The Knight of Faith. Faith and Philosophy 7 (4):383-395.
    The essay is about the “Preliminary Expectoration” of Kierkegaard’s Fear and Trembling. It argues that “the absurd” there refers primarily to the practical paradox that in faith (so it is claimed) one must simultaneously renounce and gladly accept a loved object. In other words it is about a problem of detachment as a feature of religious life. The paper goes on to interpret, and discuss critically, the views expressed in the book about both renunciation (infinite resignation) and the nature of (...)
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  2. Jonathan E. Adler (2005). William James and What Cannot Be Believed. The Harvard Review of Philosophy 13 (1):65-79.
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  3. Henry E. Allison (1969). Faith and Falsifiability. Review of Metaphysics 22 (3):499 - 522.
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  4. William P. Alston & Marcus B. Hester (eds.) (1992). Faith, Reason, and Skepticism: Essays. Temple University Press.
    INTRODUCTION William Alston opens this dialogue on faith, reason, and skepticism by arguing that if the belief-forming processes of a typical Christian are ...
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  5. Richard Askew (1988). On Fideism and Alvin Plantinga. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 23 (1):3 - 16.
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  6. Robert Audi (2008). Belief, Faith, and Acceptance. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 63 (1/3):87 - 102.
    Belief is a central focus of inquiry in the philosophy of religion and indeed in the field of religion itself. No one conception of belief is central in all these cases, and sometimes the term 'belief' is used where 'faith' or 'acceptance' would better express what is intended. This paper sketches the major concepts in the philosophy of religion that are expressed by these three terms. In doing so, it distinguishes propositional belief (belief that) from both objectual belief (believing something (...)
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  7. Guy Axtell (2006). Blind Man's Bluff: The Basic Belief Apologetic as Anti-Skeptical Stratagem. Philosophical Studies 130 (1):131--152.
    Today we find philosophical naturalists and Christian theists both expressing an interest in virtue epistemology, while starting out from vastly different assumptions. What can be done to increase fruitful dialogue among these divergent groups of virtue-theoretic thinkers? The primary aim of this paper is to uncover more substantial common ground for dialogue by wielding a double-edged critique of certain assumptions shared by `scientific' and `theistic' externalisms, assumptions that undermine proper attention to epistemic agency and responsibility. I employ a responsibilist virtue (...)
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  8. B. M. B. (1972). The Erosion of Faith. Review of Metaphysics 25 (4):757-757.
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  9. D. B. B. (1964). Belief and Faith. Review of Metaphysics 17 (3):481-481.
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  10. Richard L. Barber (1953). Experience, Reason and Faith. Tulane Studies in Philosophy 2:25-37.
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  11. James Beach (2013). John Bishop's Leaps of Faith: Doxastic Ventures and the Logical Equivalence of Religious Faith and Agnosticism. Religious Studies 50 (1):1-17.
    In recent essays John Bishop proposes a model of religious faith. This author notices that a so-called doxastic venture model of theistic faith is self-defeating for the following reason: a venture suggests a process with an outcome; by definition a venture into Christian faith denies itself an outcome in virtue of the transcendent character of its claims – for what is claimed cannot be settled. Taking instruction from logical positivism, I stress the nonsensical character of religious claims while attacking Bishop's (...)
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  12. Matthew A. Benton (2006). The Modal Gap: The Objective Problem of Lessing's Ditch(Es) and Kierkegaard's Subjective Reply. Religious Studies 42 (1):27-44.
    This essay expands upon the suggestion that Lessing's infamous ‘ditch’ is actually three ditches: temporal, metaphysical, and existential gaps. It examines the complex problems these ditches raise, and then proposes that Kierkegaard's Fragments and Postscript exhibit a similar triadic organizational structure, which may signal a deliberate attempt to engage and respond to Lessing's three gaps. Viewing the Climacean project in this way offers an enhanced understanding of the intricacies of Lessing's rationalist approach to both religion and historical truth, and illuminates (...)
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  13. John Bishop (2010). Faith. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  14. John Bishop (2007). Believing by Faith: An Essay in the Epistemology and Ethics of Religious Belief. Oxford University Press, Clarendon Press ;.
    Does our available evidence show that some particular religion is correct?
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  15. John Bishop (2002). Faith as Doxastic Venture. Religious Studies 38 (4):471-487.
    A ‘doxastic venture’ model of faith – according to which having faith involves believing beyond what is rationally justifiable – can be defended only on condition that such venturesome believing is both possible and ethically acceptable. I show how a development of the position argued by William James in ‘The will to believe’ can succeed in meeting these conditions. A Jamesian defence of doxastic venture is, however, open to the objection that decision theory teaches us that there can be no (...)
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  16. Tomas Bogardus (2013). Disagreeing with the (Religious) Skeptic. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 74 (1):5-17.
    Some philosophers believe that, when epistemic peers disagree, each has an obligation to accord the other’s assessment equal weight as her own. Other philosophers worry that this Equal-Weight View is vulnerable to straightforward counterexamples, and that it requires an unacceptable degree of spinelessness with respect to our most treasured philosophical, political, and religious beliefs. I think that both of these allegations are false. To show this, I carefully state the Equal-Weight View, motivate it, describe apparent counterexamples to it, and then (...)
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  17. Gregory Brazeal (2011). Webs of Faith as a Source of Reasonable Disagreement. Critical Review 23 (4):421-448.
    Abstract An individual's beliefs can be seen as rationally related to one another in a kind of web. These beliefs, however, may not form a single, seamless web. There may exist smaller, largely self-contained webs with few or no rational relations to the larger web. Such ?webs of faith? make it possible for reasonable deliberators to persist in a disagreement even under ideal deliberative conditions. The possibility of reasonable disagreement challenges the assumption that rationality should lead to consensus and presents (...)
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  18. L. Buchak (2012). Reasonable Faith * by John Haldane. Analysis 72 (2):413-415.
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  19. Lara Buchak (forthcoming). Rational Faith and Justified Belief. In Tim O'Connor & Laura Goins (eds.), Religious Faith and Intellectual Virtue.
    In “Can it be rational to have faith?”, it was argued that to have faith in some proposition consists, roughly speaking, in stopping one’s search for evidence and committing to act on that proposition without further evidence. That paper also outlined when and why stopping the search for evidence and acting is rationally required. Because the framework of that paper was that of formal decision theory, it primarily considered the relationship between faith and degrees of belief, rather than between faith (...)
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  20. Lara Buchak (2012). Can It Be Rational to Have Faith? In Jacob Chandler & Victoria Harrison (eds.), Probability in the Philosophy of Religion. Oxford University Press. 225.
    This paper provides an account of what it is to have faith in a proposition p, in both religious and mundane contexts. It is argued that faith in p doesn’t require adopting a degree of belief that isn’t supported by one’s evidence but rather it requires terminating one’s search for further evidence and acting on the supposition that p. It is then shown, by responding to a formal result due to I.J. Good, that doing so can be rational in a (...)
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  21. Lara Buchak (2012). Can It Be Rational to Have Faith? In Jake Chandler & Victoria Harrison (eds.), Probability in the Philosophy of Religion. Oup Oxford. 225.
  22. Andrei A. Buckareff (2009). Permissible Faith Ventures. Sophia 48 (1):85-90.
  23. Andrei A. Buckareff (2005). Can Faith Be a Doxastic Venture? Religious Studies 41 (4):435-445.
    In a recent article in this journal, John Bishop argues in defence of conceiving of Christian faith as a ‘doxastic venture’. That is, he defends the claim that, in exercising faith, agents believe beyond ‘what can be established rationally on the basis of evidence and argument’. Careful examination reveals that Bishop fails adequately to show that faith in the face of inadequate epistemic reasons for believing is, or can even be, a uniquely doxastic venture. I argue that faith is best (...)
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  24. Laura Frances Callahan & Timothy O'Connor (eds.) (2014). Religious Faith and Intellectual Virtue. Oxford University Press.
    Is religious faith consistent with being an intellectually virtuous thinker? In seeking to answer this question, one quickly finds others, each of which has been the focus of recent renewed attention by epistemologists: What is it to be an intellectually virtuous thinker? Must all reasonable belief be grounded in public evidence? Under what circumstances is a person rationally justified in believing something on trust, on the testimony of another, or because of the conclusions drawn by an intellectual authority? Can it (...)
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  25. Kelly James Clark, Religious Epistemology. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  26. Stephen Clark (2009). Understanding Faith: Religious Belief and its Place in Society. Imprint Academic.
  27. Stephen R. L. Clark (2012). Folly to the Greeks: Good Reasons to Give Up Reason. European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 4:93-113.
    A discussion of why a strong doctrine of 'reason' may not be worth sustaining in the face of modern scientific speculation, and the difficulties this poses for scientific rationality, together with comments on the social understanding of religion, and why we might wish to transcend common sense.
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  28. Philip Clayton & Steven Knapp (2011). The Predicament of Belief: Science, Philosophy, and Faith. OUP Oxford.
    Does it make sense - can it make sense - for someone who appreciates the explanatory power of modern science to continue believing in a traditional religious account of the ultimate nature and purpose of our universe? This book is intended for those who care about that question and are dissatisfied with the rigid dichotomies that dominate the contemporary debate. The extremists won't be interested - those who assume that science answers all the questions that matter, and those so certain (...)
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  29. Andrew Collier (2003). On Christian Belief: A Defence of a Cognitive Conception of Religious Belief in a Christian Context. Routledge.
    On Christian Belief offers a defense of realism in the philosophy of religion. It argues that religious belief--with particular reference to Christian belief--unlike any other kind of belief, is cognitive; making claims about what is real, and open to rational discussion between believers and non-believers. The author begins by providing a critique of several views which either try to describe a faith without cognitive context, or to justify believing on non-cognitive grounds. He then discusses what sense can be made of (...)
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  30. R. G. Collingwood (1968). Faith and Reason. Essays on the Philosophy of Religion. Quadrangle Books.
    Reprints selections from Religion and Philosophy (1916), Speculum Mentis (1924), and "Religion, Science and Philosophy". "Reason is Faith Cultivating Itself", "Faith and Reason", "What is the Problem of Evil", "The Devil", and "Can the New Idealism Dispend with Mysticism?".
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  31. John Cooper (2000). The Limits of the Sacred: The Epistemology of ʻabd Al-Karim Soroush. In Ronald L. Nettler, Mohamed Mahmoud & John Cooper (eds.), Islam and Modernity: Muslim Intellectuals Respond. I. B. Tauris.
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  32. Richard Creel (1994). Propositional Faith as a Mode of Belief and a Gift of God. Journal of Philosophical Research 19:243-256.
    Sorne people use “faith” to refer to an action, some to a passion, and sorne to a composite of the two. “Faith” is also sometimes used interchangeably with “belief.” This paper is an effort to identify and overcorne some of the problems caused by these facts. I pursue this end by distinguishing several meanings of “belief,” and by distinguishing actional faith, passional faith, and faithfulness from one another. I argue that much can be gained by restricting the meaning of “faith” (...)
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  33. Neal DeRoo & Brian Lightbody (eds.) (2008). The Logic of Incarnation: James K. A. Smith’s Critique of Postmodern Religion. Wipf and Stock.
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  34. Stephen Lawrence DeRose (2010). J. Bishop, Believing by Faith: An Essay in the Epistemology of Religious Belief. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 44 (1):103-106.
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  35. A. Dole (2009). Believing by Faith: An Essay in the Epistemology and Ethics of Religious Belief. Philosophical Review 118 (2):250-253.
    Preface ix Acknowledgements xi 1 Introduction: towards an acceptable fideism 1 The metaquestion: what is the issue about the ‘justifiability’ of religious belief? 4 Faith-beliefs 6 Overview of the argument 8 Glossary of special terms 18 2 The ‘justifiability’ of faith-beliefs: an ultimately moral issue 26 A standard view: the concern is for epistemic justifiability 26 The problem of doxastic control 28 The impossibility of believing at will 29 Indirect control over beliefs 30 ‘Holding true’ and ‘taking to be true’ (...)
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  36. Steven M. Duncan, Having Faith in Reason.
    An Address delivered to the Seattle G. K. Chesterton Society at the University of Washington Newman Center, May 2, 2013.
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  37. David Efird (2008). Believing by Faith: An Essay in the Epistemology and Ethics of Religious Belief - by John Bishop. Philosophical Books 49 (3):283-285.
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  38. Theodore J. Everett (2001). The Rationality of Science and the Rationality of Faith. Journal of Philosophy 98 (1):19-42.
    Why is science so rare and faith so common in human history? Traditional cultures persist because it is subjectively rational for each maturing child to defer to the unanimous beliefs of his elders, regardless of any personal doubts. Science is possible only when individuals promote new theories (which will probably be proven false) and forgo the epistemic advantages of accepting established views (which are more likely to be true). Hence, progressive science progress must rely upon the epistemic altruism of experimental (...)
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  39. Yiftach J. H. Fehige (2010). The Negation of Nonsense is Nonsense: Hilary Putnam on Science and Religion. Neue Zeitschrift Für Systematische Theologie Und Religionsphilosophie 52 (4):350-376.
    While the influential analytical philosopher Hilary Putnam has made significant contributions to philosophy of mind, philosophy of language and philosophy of science, he isn't generally regarded as a philosopher of religion or a theologian. Nonetheless, I argue that his work should be of great interest to philosophers of religion and theologians. Focusing on the relationship between science and religion, this paper explores the importance of Putnam's attempt to reconcile his anti-metaphysical stance and his commitment to a religious form of life (...)
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  40. Alfred Freddoso (2004). Christian Faith as a Way of Life. In William Mann (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Religion. Blackwell Pub..
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  41. Roe Fremstedal (2012). Kierkegaard's Double Movement of Faith and Kant's Moral Faith. Religious Studies 48 (2):199 - 220.
    The present article deals with religious faith by comparing the so-called double movement of faith in Kierkegaard to Kant's moral faith. Kierkegaard's double movement of faith and Kant's moral faith can be seen as providing different accounts of religious faith, as well as involving different solutions to the problem of realizing the highest good. The double movement of faith in Fear and Trembling provides an account of the structure of faith that helps us make sense of what Kierkegaard means by (...)
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  42. Alice Fulton (2007). Appendix A. Cascade Experiment. In Karen Michelle Barad (ed.), Meeting the Universe Halfway: Quantum Physics and the Entanglement of Matter and Meaning. Duke University Press.
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  43. Philippe Gagnon (2011). Penser la science et la foi par la passion de la recherche. À propos de Chercheurs en science, chercheurs de sens. Laval Théologique et Philosophique 67 (1):149-154.
    This critical notice was occasioned by the reading of a recent monograph, published at the end of 2009, which features a dialogue and a mutual critical assessment of the work of a microbiologist, also a priest from the Mission de France, and an astrophysicist who was agnostic. The book inquires into the motivations of scientific research, looks at the quest for a Creator behind the said work when done by a believer, and tries to retrieve the spiritual presuppositions that would (...)
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  44. R. Douglas Geivett & Brendan Sweetman (eds.) (1992). Contemporary Perspectives on Religious Epistemology. Oxford University Press.
    This unique textbook--the first to offer balanced, comprehensive coverage of all major perspectives on the rational justification of religious belief--includes twenty-four key papers by some of the world's leading philosophers of religion. Arranged in six sections, each representing a major approach to religious epistemology, the book begins with papers by noted atheists, setting the stage for the main theistic responses--Wittgensteinian Fideism, Reformed epistemology, natural theology, prudential accounts of religious beliefs, and rational belief based in religious experience--in each case offering a (...)
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  45. Daniel Howard-Snyder, The Skeptical Christian.
    This essay is a detailed study of William P. Alston’s view on the nature of Christian faith, which I assess in the context of three problems: the problem of the skeptical Christian, the problem of faith and reason, and the problem of the trajectory. Although Alston intended his view to solve these problems, it does so only superficially. Fortunately, we can distinguish Alston’s view, on the one hand, from his illustrations of his view, on the other hand. I argue that, (...)
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  46. Daniel Howard-Snyder (2014). Faith. In Robert Audi (ed.), The Cambridge Dictionary of Philosophy, 3rd edition. Cambridge.
    A brief article on faith as a psychological attitude.
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  47. Daniel Howard-Snyder (2013). Propositional Faith: What It is and What It is Not. American Philosophical Quarterly 50 (4):357-372.
    Reprinted in Philosophy of Religion: An Anthology, Wadsworth 2013, 6th edition, with an additional section entitled, "Reasons for the Common View," eds Michael Rea and Louis Pojman. What is propositional faith? At a first approximation, we might answer that it is the psychological attitude picked out by standard uses of the English locution “S has faith that p,” where p takes declarative sentences as instances, as in “He has faith that they’ll win”. Although correct, this answer is not nearly as (...)
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  48. Daniel Howard-Snyder (2013). Schellenberg on Propositional Faith. Religious Studies (2):181-194.
    This paper assesses J. L. Schellenberg’s account of propositional faith and, in light of that assessment, sketches an alternative that avoids certain objections and coheres better with Schellenberg’s aims.
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  49. Jeff Jordan (2008). John Bishop Believing by Faith: An Essay in the Epistemology and Ethics of Religious Belief. (Oxford:Clarendon Press, 2007). Pp. XII+250. £35.00; $65.00 (Hbk). ISBN 978 0 19 920554. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 44 (2):238-242.
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  50. Anthony Kenny (2007). Knowledge, Belief, and Faith. Philosophy 82 (3):381-397.
    Is belief in God reasonable? Richard Dawkins is right to say that traditional arguments for the existence of God are flawed; but so is his own disproof of the existence of God, and there are gaps in neo-Darwinian explanations of the origin of language, of life, and of the universe. The rational response is neither theism nor atheism but agnosticism. Faith in a creed is no virtue, but mere belief in God may be reasonable even if false.
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