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Subcategories:History/traditions: Family Ethics
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  1. Damian H. Adams (2013). Conceptualising a Child-Centric Paradigm. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (3):369-381.
    Since its inception, donor conception practices have been a reproductive choice for the infertile. Past and current practices have the potential to cause significant and lifelong harm to the offspring through loss of kinship, heritage, identity, and family health history, and possibly through introducing physical problems. Legislation and regulation in Australia that specifies that the welfare of the child born as a consequence of donor conception is paramount may therefore be in conflict with the outcomes. Altering the paradigm to a (...)
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  2. Ellen Allewijn (2010). Do Mothers Have the Right to Bring Up Their Own Children? How Facts Do Not Determine (Dutch) Government Policy. Ethics and Education 5 (2):147-157.
    The Dutch government has a double moral message for Dutch parents. On the one hand, they expect mothers to work more hours outside the home; on the other hand, they expect parents to perform better in their parental tasks. New research shows again that in spite of all stimulation measures, Dutch women with children prefer their part-time jobs, and parents prefer not to leave their children to the responsibility of day care all week. To what extent is the government allowed (...)
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  3. Brenda Almond (2012). Kantian Voices in the Family Values Debate. Ethics and Social Welfare 6 (2):143-156.
    One of the explanations frequently offered for current social problems is the breakdown of the family as an institution and the decline of values such as trust and responsibility that were until recently associated with it. While the philosophical position of many commentators in this area is rooted in a broadly utilitarian social philosophy, there is a case for an alternative?i.e. non-utilitarian?philosophical point of view. The essential requirement for such an alternative approach is that it accords a place to certain (...)
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  4. Brenda Almond (2010). Education for Tolerance: Cultural Difference and Family Values. Journal of Moral Education 39 (2):131-143.
    Those who would defend liberal democracy in today?s changing world face a new toleration debate. While we still want to help our children grow up to see the world from other perspectives than their own, we are no longer as sure as we were that we know what toleration means or what it entails. Where education is concerned, it seems the focus is on tolerance as an attitude?encouraging people to be tolerant?but where the public debate is concerned, the focus is (...)
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  5. Radhi H. Al‐Mabuk, Robert D. Enright & Paul A. Cardis (1995). Forgiveness Education with Parentally Love‐Deprived Late Adolescents. Journal of Moral Education 24 (4):427-444.
    Abstract Two studies with male and female college students (n = 48 in study 1, n = 45 in study 2), who judged themselves to be parentally love?deprived, engaged in a randomised, experimental and control group design focused on forgiving the parent(s). Study 1 was a 4?day workshop centring on a commitment to forgive. Study 2 was a 6?day workshop that included more of the therapeutic regimen from the Enright and the Human Development Study Group (1991) forgiveness model. Study 1 (...)
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  6. Betsy Anderson & Barbara Hall (1995). Parents'Perceptions of Decision Making for Children. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 23 (1):15-19.
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  7. David Archard (2013). Ethics, Sexual Orientation, and Choices About Children by Timothy F. Murphy, 2012 Cambridge, MA: MIT Press 200 Pp, £18.95 (Hb). [REVIEW] Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (2):187-189.
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  8. David Archard (2012). The Future of the Family. Ethics and Social Welfare 6 (2):132-142.
    Much is said about the decline of the family, often in connection with the prevalence of certain social problems. In this article I consider two kinds of fear: (i) that the traditional family is disappearing; (ii) that new forms of family emerging are, in some or other respect, not worthy of the title. In themselves, neither fear, I argue, should give rise to pressing ethical concerns as such. On fear (i): if by ?traditional family? we mean one whose adult members (...)
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  9. David Archard (2011). Choosing Tomorrow's Children: The Ethics of Selective Reproduction – By Stephen Wilkinson. Journal of Applied Philosophy 28 (1):101-104.
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  10. David Archard (1992). Rights, Moral Values and Natural Facts: A Reply to Mary Midgley on the Problem of Child-Abuse. Journal of Applied Philosophy 9 (1):99-104.
    Mary Midgley asserts that my argument concerning the problem of child-abuse was inappropriately framed in the language of rights, and neglected certain pertinent natural facts. I defend the view that the use of rights-talk was both apposite and did not misrepresent the moral problem in question. I assess the status and character of the natural facts Midgley adduces in criticism of my case, concluding that they do not obviously establish the conclusions she believes they do. Finally I briefly respond to (...)
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  11. Jane Attanucci (1991). Changing Subjects: Growing Up and Growing Older. Journal of Moral Education 20 (3):317-328.
    Abstract Following a review of the changing uses of narrative in moral development research, a personal narrative from an interview with a secondary teacher, who is also a parent of an adolescent is analyzed. Without standard question interruptions, the narrator crafts an ironic tale of contradictory feelings and actions. Trust is proposed as both an affective and evidential/proof dimension of the relationship between adolescents and adults, as well as among all concerned about moral development and education.
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  12. Michael W. Austin (2007). Fundamental Interests and Parental Rights. International Philosophical Quarterly 47 (2):221-235.
    I argue for a moderate view of the justification and the extent of the moral rights of parents that avoids the extremes of both children’s liberationism and parental absolutism. I claim that parents have rights qua parents, and that these prima facie rights are grounded in certain fundamental interests that both parents and children possess, namely, psychological well-being, intimate relationships, and the freedom to pursue that which brings satisfaction and meaning to life. I also examine several issues related to public (...)
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  13. Michael W. Austin (2004). The Failure of Biological Accounts of Parenthood. Journal of Value Inquiry 38 (4):499-510.
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  14. Arza Avrahami (1995). Orientation and Behaviour of Youth in the Kibbutz: Roots in Adolescent Socialisation. Journal of Moral Education 24 (3):307-326.
    Abstract This article reviews recent research focused on kibbutz youth at that stage of life between high?school graduation and their early thirties. Their attitudes and behaviour were analysed at four biographical substages: (1) voluntary community service, (2) military service, (3) leave of absence from the kibbutz and (4) higher education. It shows that there is an association between the ability of the socialising agents in the kibbutz to develop and encourage adolescents? identity and their personal democratic resources, and the attitudes (...)
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  15. Joseph J. Ayd (1937). Communism and the Family. Modern Schoolman 14 (3):61-63.
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  16. Isaac D. Balbus (2002). Having and Raising Children: Unconventional Families, Hard Choices, Social Good (Review). Hypatia 17 (2):162-165.
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  17. Rebecca Bamford (2011). Cultural Diversity, Families, and Research Subjects. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (5):33-34.
  18. Daniela Barni, Sonia Ranieri, Eugenia Scabini & Rosa Rosnati (2011). Value Transmission in the Family: Do Adolescents Accept the Values Their Parents Want to Transmit? Journal of Moral Education 40 (1):105-121.
    This study focused on value transmission in the family and assessed adolescents? acceptance of the values their parents want to transmit to them (socialisation values), identifying some factors that may affect the level of acceptance. Specifically, actual value agreement between parents, parental agreement as perceived by adolescents, parent?child closeness and promotion of child?s volitional functioning, were considered as predictors. Participants were 381 family triads (father, mother and adolescent child) from northern Italy; the adolescents (46.2% male) were all high?school students from (...)
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  19. David Benatar (1999). The Unbearable Lightness of Bringing Into Being. Journal of Applied Philosophy 16 (2):173–180.
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  20. Miriam Ben‐Peretz & Lya Kremer (1982). Value Education as Perceived by Parents, Teachers and Pupils in Israel. Journal of Moral Education 11 (4):259-265.
    Abstract The perplexity that characterizes moral education was the motive for undertaking this study. A field selection of terminal and instrumental values served as its frame of reference. Two questions were posed by the investigators: Is there any difference in the degree of importance which parents, teachers and pupils attach to these values? Do different schools rate these values differently? A sample consisting of 531 pupils, 251 parents and 38 teachers, randomly selected from five Israeli high schools, were asked to (...)
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  21. Vera Bergelson (2013). Vice is Nice But Incest is Best: The Problem of a Moral Taboo. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 7 (1):43-59.
    Incest is a crime in most societies. In the United States, incest is punishable in almost every state with sentences going as far as 20 and 30 years in prison, and even a life sentence. Yet the reasons traditionally proffered in justification of criminalization of incest—respecting religion and universal tradition; avoiding genetic abnormalities; protecting the family unit; preventing sexual abuse and sexual imposition; and precluding immorality—at a close examination, reveal their under- and over-inclusiveness, inconsistency or outright inadequacy. It appears that (...)
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  22. Marvin Berkowitz & John Grych (1998). Fostering Goodness: Teaching Parents to Facilitate Children's Moral Development. Journal of Moral Education 27 (3):371-391.
    Although moral development of children has long been ascribed predominantly to the effects of parenting, there has been little systematic examination of the specific nature of this relation. In this paper, we identify four foundational components of children's moral development (social orientation, self?control, compliance, self?esteem) and four central aspects of moral functioning (empathy, conscience, moral reasoning, altruism). The parenting roots of each of these eight psychological characteristics are examined, and five core parenting processes (induction, nurturance, demandingness, modelling, democratic family process) (...)
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  23. Ann Alpers Bernard Lo (1999). Avoiding Family Feuds: Responding to Surrogate Demands for Life-Sustaining Interventions. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 27 (1):74-80.
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  24. Lee Black & Kelly A. McClellan (2011). Familial Communication of Research Results: A Need to Know? Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (4):605-613.
    Research now provides participants greater indications of genetic risk for disease, even for conditions incidental to the research study. Given this development, should such information also be disclosed to the family of research participants? There has been some indication at the national level that genetic risk information can be disclosed to participants' families; however, limited attention has been given to returning research results to family. Thus, we have also incorporated the discussion surrounding the disclosure of genetic risk discovered in the (...)
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  25. Janet Boddy, Marjorie Smith & June Statham (2011). Understandings of Efficacy: Cross-National Perspectives on 'What Works' in Supporting Parents and Families. Ethics and Education 6 (2):181-196.
    The research literature on parenting support typically focuses on English-speaking countries, such as England, the United States and Australia. This article draws on a review, commissioned by the English government, which examined policies and services to support parenting in five European countries: Denmark, France, Germany, Italy and the Netherlands, and considered the evidence for effectiveness. In exploring differences between the five countries, and with England, this article raises questions about the way in which understandings of ?what works? can inform the (...)
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  26. Richard Bourne (1995). Ethical and Legal Dilemmas in the Management of Family Violence. Ethics and Behavior 5 (3):261 – 271.
    Hospital-based professionals who manage cases of family violence are often unclear about the benefits and costs of particular interventions to their clients. Operating under conditions of potential lethality, both to them and family members, clinicians often experience conflict between legal and ethical recommendations or between strategies intended to provide safety to victims of domestic (spousal) violence and those meant to protect children from abuse. This article presents a situation of family violence and the dilemmas of decision-making confronting both social worker (...)
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  27. Richard Bourne (1995). Special Section: Editor's Note: Ethical and Legal Dilemmas in the Management of Family Violence. Ethics and Behavior 5 (3):261 – 271.
    Hospital-based professionals who manage cases of family violence are often unclear about the benefits and costs of particular interventions to their clients. Operating under conditions of potential lethality, both to them and family members, clinicians often experience conflict between legal and ethical recommendations or between strategies intended to provide safety to victims of domestic (spousal) violence and those meant to protect children from abuse. This article presents a situation of family violence and the dilemmas of decision-making confronting both social worker (...)
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  28. Elizabeth Brake (2005). Fatherhood and Child Support: Do Men Have a Right to Choose? Journal of Applied Philosophy 22 (1):55–73.
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  29. Julia Brannen, Violetta Parutis, Ann Mooney & Valerie Wigfall (2011). Fathers and Intergenerational Transmission in Social Context. Ethics and Education 6 (2):155-170.
    This article takes an intergenerational lens to the study of fathers. It draws on evidence from two economic and social research council-funded intergenerational studies of fathers, one of which focused on four-generation British families and the other which included new migrant (Polish) fathers. The article suggests both patterns of change and continuity in fatherhood across the generations. It demonstrates how cultural forces and material conditions need to combine to facilitate change in fathers? exercise of agency and how social class and (...)
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  30. Andrea Mechanick Braverman (2012). Review of Christine Overall, Why Have Children: The Ethical Debate. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 12 (8):42 - 42.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 8, Page 42, August 2012.
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  31. Bob Brecher (2012). The Family and Neoliberalism: Time to Revive a Critique. Ethics and Social Welfare 6 (2):157-167.
    I argue that the family remains integral to neoliberal capitalism. First, I identify two tensions in the neoliberals' advocacy of the traditional family: that the ?family values? advocated run directly counter to the homo economicus of the ?free market?; and the fact that the increasingly strident rhetoric of the family belies its decreasing popularity. The implications of these tensions for how we might think of the family, I then propose, suggest that earlier critiques are worth revisiting for what they have (...)
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  32. Troyen A. Brennan (1986). Do-Not-Resuscitate Orders for the Incompetent Patient in the Absence of Family Consent. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 14 (1):13-19.
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  33. Lynn Bridgers & John R. Snarey (2003). From Father to Son: Generative Care and Gradual Conversion in William James's Writing ofThe Varieties. Journal of Moral Education 32 (4):329-340.
    Using a historical and biographical, then developmental, approach, this article examines William James's spiritual family history by reviewing key events in the life of his father, Henry James, Sr. It pays particular attention to Henry Sr's tumultuous relationship with his own father, William James of Albany, and Henry Sr's subsequent conversion to the religious thought of Emmanuel Swedenborg. James's writing of The Varieties of Religious Experience can be seen as integral to his moral and religious development; that is, it functioned (...)
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  34. Jeanne Brooks-Gunn & Mary Jane Rotheram-Borus (1994). Rights to Privacy in Research: Adolescents Versus Parents. Ethics and Behavior 4 (2):109 – 121.
    Conducting research on adolescents raises a number of ethical issues not often confronted in research on younger children. In part, these differences are due to the fact that although assent is usually not an issue, given cognitive and social competencies, the life situations and behavior of youth make it more difficult to balance rights and privacy of the adolescents. In this article, the three ethical principles of beneficence, justice, and respect for persons are discussed in terms of their application to (...)
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  35. Donald C. Bross (1983). Professional and Agency Liability for Negligence in Child Protection. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 11 (2):71-75.
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  36. Elizabeth Butler-Sloss (2004). Family and Medical Issues and the Law. Legal Ethics 7:11.
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  37. Lisa Campo-Engelstein (2013). Offering Testicular Tissue Cryopreservation to Boys: The Increasing Importance of Biological Fatherhood. American Journal of Bioethics: 13 (3):39 - 40.
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  38. Jane Caputi (1994). Unthinkable Fathering: Connecting Incest and Nuclearism. Hypatia 9 (2):102 - 122.
    The examination of cultural productions with nuclear themes reveals the regular recurrence of the theme of incestuous fatherhood. Connections include a nuclear-father figure, one who threatens dependents while purportedly protecting them; the desecration of the future; the betrayal of trust; insidious long-term effects after initial harm; the shattering of safety; the cult of secrecy, aided by psychological defenses of denial, numbing, and splitting (in both survivor and perpetrator); the violation of life-preservative taboos; and survival.
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  39. Wendy Chavkin, Vicki Breitbart & Paul H. Wise (1994). Finding Common Ground: The Necessity of an Integrated Agenda for Women's and Children's Health. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 22 (3):262-269.
  40. M. J. Cherry (2012). Building Social and Economic Capital: The Family and Medical Savings Accounts. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 37 (6):526-544.
    Despite the well-documented social, economic, and adaptive advantages for young children, adolescents, and adults, the traditional family in the West is in decline. A growing percentage of men and women choose not to be bound by the traditional moral and social expectations of marriage and family life. Adults are much more likely than in the past to live as sexually active singles, with a concomitant increase in forms of social isolation as well as in the number of children born outside (...)
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  41. Marsha H. Cohen (1995). Ethical Issues in Discharge Planning for Vulnerable Infants and Children. Ethics and Behavior 5 (1):1 – 13.
    Discharge planning for vulnerable infants and children is a collaborative, inter-disciplinary, decision-making activity that is grounded in the ethical complexities of clinical practice. Although it is a psychosocial intervention that frequently causes moral distress for professionals and has the potential to inflict harm on children and their families, the process has received little attention from ethicists. An ongoing study of the transition of technology-dependent children from hospital to home suggests that the ethical issues embedded in the discharge-planning process may be (...)
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  42. Michael Collingridge & Seumas Miller (1997). Filial Responsibility and the Care of the Aged. Journal of Applied Philosophy 14 (2):119–128.
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  43. Norman Daniels (1985). Family Responsibility Initiatives and Justice Between Age Groups. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 13 (4):153-159.
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  44. Z. E. E. der & Inez de Beaufort (2011). Preconception Care: A Parenting Protocol. A Moral Inquiry Into the Responsibilities of Future Parents Towards Their Future Children. Bioethics 25 (8):451-457.
    In the Netherlands fertility doctors increasingly formulate protocols, which oblige patients to quit their unhealthy lifestyle before they are admitted to IVF procedures. We argue that moral arguments could justify parenting protocols that concern all future parents. In the first part we argue that want-to-be parents have moral responsibilities towards their future children to prevent them from harm by diminishing or eliminating risk factors before as well as during the pregnancy. This is because of the future children's potential to become (...)
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  45. J. Duncan M. Derrett (1985). Honour Thy Father and Thy Mother…' a Comment on Rosenthal's 'The Filial Art. Journal of Applied Philosophy 2 (2):281-282.
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  46. Nicholas Dixon (1995). The Friendship Model of Filial Obligations. Journal of Applied Philosophy 12 (1):77-87.
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  47. Daniel A. Dombrowski (1994). The Politics of Ethology. Critical Review 8 (3):359-369.
    While the academic discussion of gender and family issues often adopts the contractarian and consensual approach of liberalism, the work of Stephen R. L. Clark provides an interesting contrast. Clark turns to ethology as a guide to modes of social existence congruent with our evolutionary nature. Although an Aristotelian, Clark is not a sexist in arguing that household life is more important than what moderns call ?political? life. Clark is premature, however, in accusing liberals who defend the rights of individuals (...)
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  48. John Drayton (2011). Organ Retention and Bereavement: Family Counselling and the Ethics of Consultation. Ethics and Social Welfare 5 (3):227-246.
    Taking organisational responses to the ?organ retention scandals? in the United Kingdom and Australia as a starting point, this paper considers the role of social welfare workers within the medico-legal system. Official responses to the inquiries of the late 1990s have focused on issues of consent and process-transparency, leaving unaddressed concerns expressed by the bereaved about the impact of organ retention on both their experience of grief and on the deceased themselves. A review of grief and embodiment literature suggests that (...)
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  49. Yuval Dror (1995). The Kibbutz Children's Society‐‐Ideal and Reality. Journal of Moral Education 24 (3):273-288.
    Abstract This article examines the Kibbutz children's society as an ideal and as it is in reality. Following an account of the vision and theory of the children's society four case studies are reported. Two are historical: the local children's society founded in Kibbutz Ein Harod in 1924; and the attempt by Zisling of Ein Harod to found a national children's society on the basis of local models. The other two are contemporary and relate to studies in the early 1990s (...)
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  50. Sue Dumbleton (2013). Goodies and Baddies: Equivocal Thoughts About Families Using an Autoethnographic Approach to Explore Some Tensions Between Service Providers and Families of People with Learning Disabilities. Ethics and Social Welfare 7 (3):282-292.
    This paper will explore the power of history in affecting contemporary caring practice. Drawing on the author's personal experience as a social worker, researcher and parent of a daughter with learning disabilities, the article will consider the ways in which the experience of (and to an extent, nostalgia for) the ?heady days? of de-institutionalisation continues to influence staff perceptions about their work. In doing so, this article will critique normative notions of choice and control that are at the heart of (...)
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