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Family Ethics

Edited by Anca Gheaus (University of Sheffield)
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Subcategories:History/traditions: Family Ethics
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  1. Ellen Allewijn (2010). Do Mothers Have the Right to Bring Up Their Own Children? How Facts Do Not Determine (Dutch) Government Policy. Ethics and Education 5 (2):147-157.
    The Dutch government has a double moral message for Dutch parents. On the one hand, they expect mothers to work more hours outside the home; on the other hand, they expect parents to perform better in their parental tasks. New research shows again that in spite of all stimulation measures, Dutch women with children prefer their part-time jobs, and parents prefer not to leave their children to the responsibility of day care all week. To what extent is the government allowed (...)
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  2. Betsy Anderson & Barbara Hall (1995). Parents'Perceptions of Decision Making for Children. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 23 (1):15-19.
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  3. Anca Gheaus (2016). The Right to Parent and Duties Concerning Future Generations. Journal of Political Philosophy 24 (1).
    Several philosophers argue that individuals have an interest-protecting right to parent; specifically, the interest is in rearing children whom one can parent adequately. If such a right exists it can provide a solution to scepticism about duties of justice concerning distant future generations and bypass the challenge provided by the non-identity problem. Current children - whose identity is independent from environment-affecting decisions of current adults - will have, in due course, a right to parent. Adequate parenting requires resources. We owe (...)
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  4. Anca Gheaus (2009). Review of Harry Adams Justice for Children. Autonomy, Development and the State. [REVIEW] Metaphsychology Online 13 (34).
  5. Susanne Gibson (1995). Reasons for Having Children: Ends, Means and 'Family Values'. Journal of Applied Philosophy 12 (3):231-240.
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  6. Michael Gill, Picu Prometheus: Ethical Issues in the Treatment of Very Sick Children in Paediatric Intensive Care.
    Through a focus on one child’s extended stay in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, I raise four general questions about pediatric medicine: How should physicians communicate with parents of very sick children? How should physicians involve parents of very sick children in treatment decisions? How should care be coordinated when a child is being treated by different medical teams with rotating personnel? Should the guidelines for making judgments of medical futility and discontinuation of treatment differ when the patient is a (...)
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  7. Felix E. Goodson, Michael P. Silver, Joseph Schumaker & Bette M. Bunting (1982). Intersensory Concepts in Children. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 19 (5):259-260.
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  8. Michael C. Gottlieb (1995). Family Violence and Family Systems: Who is the Patient? Ethics and Behavior 5 (3):273 – 277.
  9. Erica Haimes (2006). Social and Ethical Issues in the Use of Familial Searching in Forensic Investigations: Insights From Family and Kinship Studies. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 34 (2):263-276.
    This article explores the socio-ethical concerns raised by the familial searching of forensic databases in criminal investigations, from the perspective of family and kinship studies. It discusses the broader implications of this expanded understanding for wider debates about identity, privacy and genetic databases.
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  10. J. Mark Halstead (1999). Moral Education in Family Life: The Effects of Diversity. Journal of Moral Education 28 (3):265-281.
    Diversity is a feature of family life which those who speak of the importance of family values should not ignore. The diversity is seen not only in the structure of families, but also in the moral values which children actually pick up in the context of the family and the way in which the transmission of values occurs. Diversity becomes a matter of public importance when the values which children develop at home are perceived to be in serious conflict with (...)
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  11. Joan Cusack Handler (forthcoming). Between Parents. Feminist Studies.
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  12. Russell Hanford & John R. Snarey (2001). Parenting Huckleberry Finn. Journal of Moral Education 30 (3):293-297.
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  13. Daniel Hart, Robert Atkins & Debra Ford (1999). Family Influences on the Formation of Moral Identity in Adolescence: Longitudinal Analyses. Journal of Moral Education 28 (3):375-386.
    A model of moral identity formation is presented. According to the model, family influences have a direct effect on moral identity development in adolescence, independent of the effects of personality, income and other factors. The model is tested using longitudinal data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (Child Sample), which is constituted of the children born to a representative sample of American women who were between the ages of 14 and 21 in 1979. In general, the results provide support (...)
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  14. Christie Hartley & Lori Watson (2012). Political Liberalism, Marriage and the Family. Law and Philosophy 31 (2):185-212.
    Can and should political liberals recognize and otherwise support legal marriage as a matter of basic justice? In this article, we offer a general account of how political liberals should evaluate the issue of whether the legal recognition of marriage is a matter of basic justice. And, we develop and examine some public reason arguments that, given the fundamental interests of citizens, could justify various forms of legal marriage in some contexts. In particular, in certain conditions, the recognition of some (...)
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  15. Govert Hartogh (2014). Comforting the Parents by Administering Neuromuscular Blockers to the Dying Child: A Conflict Between Ethics and Law? Journal of Applied Philosophy 31 (1):91-103.
    When the decision has been made to stop treatment of a newborn child with a bad prognosis, the child usually dies in a short time. Sometimes, however, gasping occurs, and although it is usually thought that this is not a sign of suffering, the parents can hardly fail to interpret it as such. Could that be a reason to administer muscle relaxants to the child? It would not harm the child and may greatly benefit the parents. So it seems the (...)
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  16. Carl Hedman (2000). Three Approaches to the Problem of Child Abuse and Neglect. Journal of Social Philosophy 31 (3):268–285.
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  17. Rachael M. Henry (1988). Cognitive, Affective and Situational Factors in Child Rearing. Journal of Moral Education 17 (2):127-147.
    Abstract The study explores cognitive, affective and situational factors in child?rearing and their relation to children's constructions of discipline and to the maturity of their social interactions. Subjects were 17 children aged between three years 10 months and four years 11 months and their mothers. Mothers? individual constructions of different classes of their own and their children's transgressions were measured using two Repertory Grids. Children's constructions and feelings about a recent conflict with parents were measured by a structured interview. Their (...)
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  18. Gail Heyman, Diem Luu & Kang Lee (2009). Parenting by Lying. Journal of Moral Education 38 (3):353-369.
    The present set of studies identifies the phenomenon of ?parenting by lying?, in which parents lie to their children as a means of influencing their emotional states and behaviour. In Study 1, undergraduates (n = 127) reported that their parents had lied to them while maintaining a concurrent emphasis on the importance of honesty. In Study 2 (n = 127), parents reported lying to their children and considered doing so to be acceptable under some circumstances, even though they also reported (...)
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  19. Joe Holland (2012). The Crisis of Family and Unions in Late Modern Global Capitalism. Journal of Catholic Social Thought 9 (1):43-58.
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  20. Annette Karmilqfj-Smith (1982). 4 Modifications in Children's. In B. De Gelder (ed.), Knowledge and Representation. Routledge & Kegan Paul 65.
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  21. Gunni Kärrby (1973). A Report on Some Studies of the Influence of Family Background Upon Moral Development. Journal of Moral Education 2 (3):263-268.
    (1973). A Report on Some Studies of the Influence of Family Background upon Moral Development. Journal of Moral Education: Vol. 2, No. 3, pp. 263-268.
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  22. Adam Kay (2012). Reasoning About Family Honour Among Two Generations of Hindu Indian-Americans. Journal of Moral Education 41 (1):79-98.
    To investigate reasoning about family honour, 128 first generation (mean age = 27.2 years) and second generation Hindu Indian-American adults (mean age = 24.7 years) were presented hypothetical scenarios in which male or female protagonists defied common Hindu customs (e.g., arranged marriage, intra-religion marriage and premarital sexual abstinence). Questions assessed beliefs about customs, connections to family honour and socio-moral orientations towards honour violations. Both generations perceived intra-religion marriage and premarital sexual abstinence to function for group identity-related reasons, such as preserving (...)
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  23. Justice M. D. Kirby (1986). Medical Technology and New Frontiers of Family Law. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 14 (3-4):113-119.
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  24. Pauline Kleingeld & Joel Anderson (2014). Justice as a Family Value: How a Commitment to Fairness is Compatible with Love. Hypatia 29 (2):320-336.
    Many discussions of love and the family treat issues of justice as something alien. On this view, concerns about whether one's family is internally just are in tension with the modes of interaction that are characteristic of loving families. In this essay, we challenge this widespread view. We argue that once justice becomes a shared family concern, its pursuit is compatible with loving familial relations. We examine four arguments for the thesis that a concern with justice is not at home (...)
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  25. Dudley Knowles (2001). Parents' Consent to the Post-Mortem Removal and Retention of Organs. Journal of Applied Philosophy 18 (3):215–227.
    Parents of children who died following complex heart surgery have recently discovered that organs were removed and retained in post-m.
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  26. Avery Kolers & Tim Bayne (2001). "Are You My Mommy?" On the Genetic Basis of Parenthood. Journal of Applied Philosophy 18 (3):273–285.
    What exactly is it that makes someone a parent? Many people hold that parenthood is grounded, in the first instance, in the natural derivation of one person's genetic constitution from the genetic constitutions of others. We refer to this view as "Geneticism". In Part I we distinguish three forms of geneticism on the basis of whether they hold that direct genetic derivation is sufficient, necessary, or both sufficient and necessary, for parenthood. Parts two through four examine three arguments for geneticism: (...)
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  27. Kristja´N. Kristja´Nsson * (2004). Empathy, Sympathy, Justice and the Child. Journal of Moral Education 33 (3):291-305.
    This essay explains and puts into theoretical perspective the rising interest in justice as an emotional virtue. Martin Hoffman's empathy theory is germane to this debate since it gives an essentially emotion?oriented account of moral development in general, as well as an explanation of the gradual bonding of empathy/sympathy with justice. While Hoffman's theory provides valuable insights into the ways in which all moral concerns, including justice, rely on and relate to the child's original capacity for empathy, it seems to (...)
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  28. Kristja´N. Kristja´Nsson * (2004). Empathy, Sympathy, Justice and the Child. Journal of Moral Education 33 (3):291-305.
    This essay explains and puts into theoretical perspective the rising interest in justice as an emotional virtue. Martin Hoffman's empathy theory is germane to this debate since it gives an essentially emotion?oriented account of moral development in general, as well as an explanation of the gradual bonding of empathy/sympathy with justice. While Hoffman's theory provides valuable insights into the ways in which all moral concerns, including justice, rely on and relate to the child's original capacity for empathy, it seems to (...)
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  29. Kathryn Kuehnle (1998). Ethics and the Forensic Expert: A Case Study of Child Custody Involving Allegations of Child Sexual Abuse. Ethics and Behavior 8 (1):1 – 18.
    Psychologists who participate as forensic evaluators in custody and visitation cases involving allegations of child sexual abuse must possess advanced assessment skills and a thorough knowledge of child development, child sexual abuse, and child interviewing techniques. This case study illustrates the types of problems that are inevitable when psychologists violate the boundaries of their role as an independent evaluator and fail to uphold their ethical obligation to be knowledgeable and competent in the area in which they profess expertise.
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  30. Will Kymlicka (1991). Review: Rethinking the Family. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Public Affairs 20 (1):77 - 97.
  31. Daniel D. Leddy (1985). Families in Need of Supervision. Criminal Justice Ethics 4 (1):19-38.
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  32. Bas Levering (2011). 'The Interests of the Child' Seen From the Child's Perspective: The Case of the Netherlands. Ethics and Education 6 (2):109-123.
    The Dutch government has decided to intervene in parents? role in bringing up their children by imposing compulsory parenting support. As such an intervention has to be legitimatised as being ?in the interests of the child?, it is important to take a closer look at this concept. First it is shown that it is not evident that the government has the right to intervene in this way. Within the ?child?parents?government? triangle three protective shells of self-determination can be distinguished. One of (...)
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  33. Benjamin H. Levi & Sharon G. Portwood (2011). Reasonable Suspicion of Child Abuse: Finding a Common Language. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 39 (1):62-69.
    In the United States, the implementation of a successful system of mandated reporting of suspected child abuse continues to be plagued by the absence of a clear standard for when one must report. All 50 states of the U.S. have laws requiring certain individuals to report suspected child abuse. However, at present, there are variable thresholds for mandated reporting and no clear consensus on how existing thresholds should be interpreted. Because “child abuse” is often present as a possible etiology for (...)
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  34. Hon-Lam Li (2013). Engelhardt on the Family. International Journal of Chinese and Comparative Philosophy of Medicine (153-160).
    Tristram Engelhardt, Jr. offers erudite and compelling arguments for the view that all families should try to realize the traditional family. Although I tend to agree with him from my personal standpoint, I doubt that this view can be justified to those with whom we are in reasonable disagreement about the family. I make three critical points. First, though Engelhardt stops short of saying that the state should encourage people to form traditonal families, or discourage those who do not, some (...)
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  35. Hon-Lam Li (2013). Engelhardt on the Family. International Journal of Chinese and Comparative Philosophy of Medicine (153-160).
    Tristram Engelhardt, Jr. offers erudite and compelling arguments for the view that all families should try to realize the traditional family. Although I tend to agree with him from my personal standpoint, I doubt that this view can be justified to those with whom we are in reasonable disagreement about the family. I make three critical points. First, though Engelhardt stops short of saying that the state should encourage people to form traditonal families, or discourage those who do not, some (...)
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  36. Marisha B. Liss (1994). Child Abuse: Is There a Mandate for Researchers to Report? Ethics and Behavior 4 (2):133 – 146.
    During the past 20 years, states have increasingly expanded the lists of individuals who are obligated to report their suspicions of child abuse and neglect. These legal requirements are juxtaposed with ethical considerations in research and professional practice. The ethical issues include the obligation to maintain both confidentiality of information provided by human participants and the safety and protection of these participants. This article reviews the types of state child abuse reporting statutes and outlines the categories of mandated reporters. I (...)
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  37. Reginald A. Litz & Nick Turner (2013). Sins of the Father's Firm: Exploring Responses to Inherited Ethical Dilemmas in Family Business. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 113 (2):297-315.
    How do individuals respond when they perceive that their family business has been built upon unethical business conduct? Drawing on an expanded version of Hirschman’s typology of generic responses to declining situations (Exit, Voice and Loyalty: Responses to Decline in Firms, Organizations, and States, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA, 1970), which includes responses of Exit, Voice, Loyalty, and Neglect, we offer a model that predicts probability of intended response behavior as a function of normative obligation (i.e., what one perceives ought (...)
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  38. Susan Lollis, Geraldine van Engen, Louise Burns, Katherine Nowack & Hildy Ross (1999). Sibling Socialisation of Moral Orientation: 'Share with Me!' 'No, It's Mine!'. Journal of Moral Education 28 (3):339-357.
    Sibling socialisation of moral orientation was investigated in 40 dual-parent families with two children, aged 2 and 4 years. Of particular interest were: (a) the prevalence of use of care and justice moral orientations by the children during real-life dilemmas with siblings, (b) the ability of the children to combine both care and justice orientations in resolving the dilemmas, and (c) the presence of sex differences in the use of the two orientations. Data consisted of transcripts of sibling interactions during (...)
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  39. Mianna Lotz (2004). Childhood Obesity and the Question of Parental Liberty. Journal of Social Philosophy 35 (2):288–303.
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  40. Meg Luxton (1997). Nothing Natural About It: The Contradictions of Parenting. In Hilde Lindemann (ed.), Feminism and Families. Routledge 162--181.
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  41. Janet Malek (2013). Use or Refuse Reproductive Genetic Technologies: Which Would a 'Good Parent' Do? Bioethics 27 (2):59-64.
    A number of authors have objected to potential parents' use of reproductive genetic technologies on the grounds that the use of these technologies reflects a morally problematic attitude toward parenting. More specifically, proponents of this view have argued that such a choice is inconsistent with the unconditional acceptance that lies at the heart of praiseworthy parental attitudes. This paper offers a rebuttal of this view by arguing that it is possible for a parent to exhibit unconditional acceptance of the child (...)
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  42. Janet Malek & Judith Daar (2012). The Case for a Parental Duty to Use Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for Medical Benefit. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (4):3-11.
    This article explores the possibility that there is a parental duty to use preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for the medical benefit of future children. Using one genetic disorder as a paradigmatic example, we find that such a duty can be supported in some situations on both ethical and legal grounds. Our analysis shows that an ethical case in favor of this position can be made when potential parents are aware that a possible future child is at substantial risk of inheriting (...)
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  43. Ron Mallon (1999). Political Liberalism, Cultural Membership, and the Family. Social Theory and Practice 25 (2):271-297.
  44. Rita Manning (2011). Punishing the Innocent: Children of Incarcerated and Detained Parents. Criminal Justice Ethics 30 (3):267-287.
    About 2 million minor children in the U.S. have at least one parent incarcerated for criminal offenses. There are about 33,000 undocumented persons detained by Immigration and Customs Enforcement in jails and federal detention centers around the country, and 79% of the minor children of these detainees are U.S. citizens. There are few government programs that measure and respond to the harm caused to these children by the incarceration and detention of their parents, and the negative effects on these children (...)
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  45. Marc C. Marchese, Gregory Bassham & Jack Ryan (2002). Work-Family Conflict: A Virtue Ethics Analysis. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 40 (2):145 - 154.
    Work-family conflict has been examined quite often in human resources management and industrial/organizational psychology literature. Numerous statistics show that the magnitude of this employment issue will continue to grow. As employees attempt to balance work demands and family responsibilities, organizations will have to decide to what extent they will go to minimize this conflict. Research has identified numerous negative consequences of work-family stressors for organizations, for employees and for employees' families. There are however many options to reduce this strain, each (...)
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  46. Kevin Marjoribanks (1996). Family Socialisation and Children's School Outcomes: An Investigation of a Parenting Model. Educational Studies 22 (1):3-11.
    The study investigated relationships between the dimensions of a parenting model and children's school outcomes. Also, a bioecological model was examined which proposes that proximal parenting processes have the general effect of mediating relationships between distal social contexts and children's outcomes, while advantageous individual characteristics enhance associations between proximal family processes and children's characteristics. Data were collected from 900 11 year‐old Australian children and their parents. The findings suggest that: a parenting model defined by parents’ aspirations, parenting practices, and parenting (...)
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  47. Gareth B. Matthews (1985). Parents and Children: The Ethics of the Family by Jeffrey Blustein. Journal of Philosophy 82 (6):330-332.
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  48. James McBain (2013). Reproductive Reasons and Procreative Duty. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 27 (1):67-74.
    Debates on procreative liberty usually surround the issue of whether it is permissible to not bring a child into existence. However, some argue that, under certain conditions, there is an obligation to bring a child (or even as many children as possible) into existence. This position, I will call the procreative duty stance, is argued for in two general ways—obligations arising from the extinction of the human species and obligations arising from personal reasons which override the reluctance of a potential (...)
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  49. Kevin McGovern (2010). Adoption Is Better Than Abortion. Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 16 (1):4.
    McGovern, Kevin When a girl or woman has an unplanned pregnancy, her choices are to keep the child, to give the child for adoption, or to have an abortion. The best outcome is any situation which allows her to keep and successfully raise the child. When this is not possible, this article argues that modern open adoption is a better outcome for both the woman and her child than abortion. In making this argument, this article reviews the complex social history (...)
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  50. Michael S. Merry (2007). The Well-Being of Children, the Limits of Paternalism, and the State: Can Disparate Interests Be Reconciled? Ethics and Education 2 (1):39-59.
    For many, it is far from clear where the prerogatives of parents to educate as they deem appropriate end and the interests of their children, immediate or future, begin. In this article I consider the educational interests of children and argue that children have an interest in their own well-being. Following this, I will examine the interests of parents and consider where the limits of paternalism lie. Finally, I will consider the state's interest in the education of children and discuss (...)
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