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  1. William Aiken (1990). Famine and Distribution. Journal of Philosophy 87 (11):642-643.
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  2. William Aiken & Hugh LaFollette (eds.) (1995). World Hunger and Morality. Prentice-Hall.
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  3. Christian Barry & Scott Wisor (2013). Global Poverty. In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
  4. Yiwei Cheng (2012). An Analysis of the Main Causes of the Holodomor. Constellations 3 (2).
    The 1932-33 Ukrainian Famine has always been a very controversial topic in Ukrainian history. Scholars generally blame Stalin and his rural collectivization policy. The lack of agricultural machinery, ineffective organization and the awkward relations between the village officials and local peasants all contributed to the famine. By using both Ukrainian and Western documents, this paper is devoted to the analyzing of the main causes of the famine.
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  5. Stephen R. L. Clark (1999). Living High and Letting Die: Our Illusion of Innocence by Peter Unger. Oxford University Press: New York & Oxford, 1996, 199pp; ISBN 0195075897 £35.00; 0195108590 £13.50. [REVIEW] Philosophy 74 (1):122-139.
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  6. Robert Coburn (1976). On Fieding the Hungry. Journal of Social Philosophy 7 (3):11-16.
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  7. Mylan Engel (2004). Taking Hunger Seriously. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 4 (1):29-57.
    An argument is advanced to show that affluent and moderately affluent people, like you and me, are morally obligated: (O1) To provide modest financial support for famine relief organizations and/or other humanitanan organizations working to reduce the amount of unnecessary suffering and death in the world, and (O2) To refrain from squandering food that could be fed to humans in situations of food scarcity. Unlike other ethical arguments for the obligation to assist the world’s absolutely poor, my argument is not (...)
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  8. R. G. Frey & Christopher Heath Wellman (eds.) (2003). Blackwell Companion to Applied Ethics. Blackwell.
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  9. Pablo Gilabert (2008). Global Justice and Poverty Relief in Nonideal Circumstances. Social Theory and Practice 34 (3):411-438.
  10. Nicole Hassoun (2008). World Poverty and Individual Freedom. American Philosophical Quarterly 45 (2): 191-198.
  11. Peter Higgins, Audra King & April Shaw (2008). What is Poverty? In Rebecca Whisnant & Peggy DesAutels (eds.), Global Feminist Ethics: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory. Rowman & Littlefield.
    Invoking three desiderata (empirical adequacy, conceptual precision, and sensitivity to social positioning), this paper argues that poverty is best understood as the deprivation of certain human capabilities. It defends this way of conceiving of poverty against standard alternatives: lack of income, lack of resources, inequality, and social exclusion.
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  12. Keith Horton (2004). Famine and Fanaticism: A Response to Kekes. Philosophy 79 (2):319-327.
    In this paper, I critically discuss a number of arguments made by John Kekes, in a recent article, against the claim that those of us who are relatively affluent ought to do something for those living in absolute poverty in developing countries. There are, I argue, a variety of problems with Kekes' arguments, but one common thread stems from Kekes' failure to take account of the empirical research that has been conducted on the issues which he discusses.
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  13. John Howie (1987). World Hunger and a Moral Right to Subsistence. Journal of Social Philosophy 18 (3):27-31.
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  14. Dale Jamieson (2005). Duties to the Distant: Aid, Assistance, and Intervention in the Developing World. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 9 (1-2):151 - 170.
    In his classic article, Famine, Affluence, and Morality (Philosophy and Public Affairs 1 (1972), pp. 229–243), Peter Singer claimed that affluent people in the developed world are morally obligated to transfer large amounts of resources to poor people in the developing world. For present purposes I will not call Singers argument into question. While people can reasonably disagree about exactly how demanding morality is with respect to duties to the desperate, there is little question in my mind that it is (...)
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  15. John Kekes (2002). On the Supposed Obligation to Relieve Famine. Philosophy 77 (4):503-517.
    In an influential paper, Peter Singer claims that affluent people have a strong obligation to relieve famine. If they fail, they allow others to die, and makes them murderers. In responding to this outrageous claim, which has given uneasy conscience to many, I show that Singer is engaged in indefensible moralizing that substitutes bullying for reasoned argument and gives a bad name to morality.
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  16. Hugh LaFollette (2003). World Hunger. In R. G. Frey & Christopher Heath Wellman (eds.), Blackwell Companion to Applied Ethics. Blackwell.
    W e are watching television, and an advertisement for UNICEF, OXFAM, or the Christian Children’s Fund interrupts our favorite show. We grab our remotes and quickly flip to another channel. Perhaps we mosey to the kitchen for a snack. Maybe we just sit, trying not to watch. These machinations may banish these haunting images of destitute, starving children from our TVs and our thoughts, but they do not alter the brutal facts: millions of people in the world are undernourished; thousands (...)
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  17. Larry May & Hugh LaFollette (1995). Suffer the Little Children. In William Aiken & Hugh LaFollette (eds.), World Hunger and Morality. Prentice-Hall.
    Children are the real victims of world hunger: at least 70% of the malnourished people of the world are children. By best estimates forty thousand children a day die of starvation (FAO 1989: 5). Children do not have the ability to forage for themselves, and their nutritional needs are exceptionally high. Hence, they are unable to survive for long on their own, especially in lean times. Moreover, they are especially susceptible to diseases and conditions which are the staple of undernourished (...)
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  18. Peter Singer (1972). Famine, Affluence, and Morality. Philosophy and Public Affairs 1 (3):229-243.
    As I write this, in November 1971, people are dying in East Bengal from lack of food, shelter, and medical caxc. The suffering and death that are occurring there now axe not inevitable, 1101; unavoidable in any fatalistic sense of the term. Constant poverty, a cyclone, and a civil war have turned at least nine million people into destitute refugees; nevertheless, it is not beyond Lhe capacity of the richer nations to give enough assistance to reduce any further suffering to (...)
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  19. Makoto Usami (2005). World Poverty and Justice Beyond Borders. Tokyo Institute of Technology Department of Social Engineering Discussion Paper (05-04):1-18.
    Most cosmopolitans who are concerned about world poverty assume that for citizens of affluent societies, justice beyond national borders is a matter of their positive duty to provide aid to distant people suffering from severe poverty. This assumption is challenged by some authors, notably Tomas Pogge, who maintains that these citizens are actively involved in the incidence of poverty abroad and therefore neglect their negative duty of refraining from harming others. This paper examines the extent to which it is pertinent (...)
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  20. Scott Wisor (2011). Against Shallow Ponds: An Argument Against Singer's Approach to Global Poverty. Journal of Global Ethics 7 (1):19 - 32.
    For 40 years, Peter Singer has deployed the case of the child drowning in the shallow pond to argue for greater donations in foreign aid. The persistent use of the shallow pond example in theorizing about global poverty ignores morally salient features of the real world, and ignoring such morally salient features can have a variety of harmful implications for anti-poverty work. I argue that the shallow pond example should be abandoned, and defend this claim against possible objections.
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  21. Tomasz Żuradzki (2007). Utylitarystyczna utopia jednego świata. Etyka 40:176-82.
    Recenzja książki Petera Singera, Jeden świat. Etyka globalizacji, Wydawnictwo „Książka i Wiedza”, Warszawa 2006.
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