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  1. Pamela Abbott (2005). An Introduction to Sociology: Feminist Perspectives. Routledge.
    This third edition of the bestselling An Introduction to Sociology: Feminist Perspectives confirms the ongoing centrality of feminist perspectives and research to the sociological enterprise and introduces students to the wide range of feminist contributions to key areas of sociological concern. This completely revised edition includes: · new chapters on sexuality and the media · additional material on race and ethnicity, disability and the body · many new international and comparative examples · the influence of theories of globalization and post-colonial (...)
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  2. Joelle M. Abi-Rached (2011). REVIEW: Robert A. Aronowitz. Unnatural History: Breast Cancer and American Society. [REVIEW] Spontaneous Generations 5 (1):79-82.
    “Breast cancer is all around us.” This is how Robert Aronowitz, a medical doctor, opens his timely Unnatural History: Breast Cancer and American Society. We are all familiar with the truism that “one in eight American women” will develop invasive breast cancer over the course of her lifetime. The pink ribbon has come to symbolize both solidarity and hope. Mammograms and “Self-Breast Examination” have become part of women’s daily routine, if not a spectre haunting their daily lives. Yet the evidence (...)
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  3. Ben Almassi (2010). Disability, Functional Diversity, and Trans/Feminism. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 3 (2):126-149.
    Feminist approaches to bioethics have the striking ability to usefully disrupt conversations otherwise in danger of calcifying into immovable opposing camps. Take, for instance, debates between theorists in disability studies and bioethicists who often take two different approaches to understanding disability. On one side are those such as Buchanan, Brock, Daniels, and Wikler (2000) who seek to locate the apparent functional deficiency of disability in biologically abnormal bodies. Let us call this a normal functioning approach to understanding disability. On the (...)
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  4. Rosemary Betterton (2006). Promising Monsters: Pregnant Bodies, Artistic Subjectivity, and Maternal Imagination. Hypatia 21 (1):80-100.
    : This paper engages with theories of the monstrous maternal in feminist philosophy to explore how examples of visual art practice by Susan Hiller, Marc Quinn, Alison Lapper, Tracey Emin, and Cindy Sherman disrupt maternal ideals in visual culture through differently imagined body schema. By examining instances of the pregnant body represented in relation to maternal subjectivity, disability, abortion, and "prosthetic" pregnancy, it asks whether the "monstrous" can offer different kinds of figurations of the maternal that acknowledge the agency and (...)
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  5. Lisa Bortolotti & John Harris (2006). Disability, Enhancement and the Harm -Benefit Continuum. In John R. Spencer & Antje Du Bois-Pedain (eds.), Freedom and Responsibility in Reproductive Choice. Hart Publishers.
    Suppose that you are soon to be a parent and you learn that there are some simple measures that you can take to make sure that your child will be healthy. In particular, suppose that by following the doctor’s advice, you can prevent your child from having a disability, you can make your child immune from a number of dangerous diseases and you can even enhance its future intelligence. All that is required for this to happen is that you (or (...)
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  6. M. J. Brueton (1988). Care of the Handicapped Newborn: Parental Responsibility and Medical Responsibility. Journal of Medical Ethics 14 (1):48-49.
  7. Allen Buchanan (1996). Choosing Who Will Be Disabled: Genetic Intervention and the Morality of Inclusion. Social Philosophy and Policy 13 (02):18-.
  8. Joan Callahan (2001). Book Review: Leslie Pickering Francis and Anita Silvers. Americans with Disabilities: Exploring Implications of the Law for Individuals and Institutions New York: Routledge, 2000. [REVIEW] Hypatia 16 (4):147-155.
  9. Joan C. Callahan (2001). Americans with Disabilities: Exploring Implications of the Law for Individuals and Institutions (Review). Hypatia 16 (4):147-155.
  10. Joan C. Callahan (2001). Review of Americans with Disabilities: Exploring Implications of the Law for Individuals and Institutions by Anita Silvers and Leslie Pickering Francis. [REVIEW] Hypatia 16 (4).
  11. Licia Carlson (2001). Cognitive Ableism and Disability Studies: Feminist Reflections on the History of Mental Retardation. Hypatia 16 (4):124-146.
    This paper examines five groups of women that were instrumental in the emergence of the category of "feeblemindedness" in the United States. It analyzes the dynamics of oppression and power relations in the following five groups of women: "feeble-minded" women, institutional caregivers, mothers, researchers, and reformists. Ultimately, I argue that a feminist analysis of the history of mental retardation is necessary to serve as a guide for future feminist work on cognitive disability.
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  12. Licia Carlson & Eva Feder Kittay (2009). Introduction: Rethinking Philosophical Presumptions in Light of Cognitive Disability. Metaphilosophy 40 (3-4):307-330.
  13. Shirley Castelnuovo (1998). Feminism and the Female Body: Liberating the Amazon Within. L. Rienner Publishers.
  14. Rutger Claassen (2011). The Commodification of Care. Hypatia 26 (1):43-64.
    This paper discusses the question whether care work for dependent persons (children, the elderly, and disabled persons) may be entrusted to the market; that is, whether and to what extent there is a normative justification for the “commodification of care.” It first proposes a capability theory for care that raises two relevant demands: a basic capability for receiving care and a capability for giving care. Next it discusses and rejects two objections that aim to show that market-based care undermines the (...)
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  15. Mairian Corker (2001). Sensing Disability. Hypatia 16 (4):34-52.
    : Disability theory privileges masculinist notions of presence, visibility, material "reality," and identity as "given." One effect of this has been the erasure of "sensibility," which, it is argued, inscribes, materializes, and performs the critique of binary thought. Therefore, sensibility must be re-articulated in order to escape the "necessary error" of identity implicit in accounts of cultural diversity, and to dialogue across difference in ways that dislocate disability from its position of dis-value in feminist thought.
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  16. Pamela Cushing & Tanya Lewis (2002). Negotiating Mutuality and Agency in Care-Giving Relationships with Women with Intellectual Disabilities. Hypatia 17 (3):173-193.
    : This article is an ethnographic analysis of the mutuality that is possible in relationships between caregivers and women with intellectual disabilities who live together in L'Arche homes. Creating mutuality through which both parties grow and exercise agency requires that caregivers learn to negotiate delicate power relations connected to the physics of care and to reframe dominant stereotypes of disability. This helps them to support the women with intellectual disabilities to name and achieve their desires.
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  17. A. Davis (1986). Informed Dissent: The View of a Disabled Woman. Journal of Medical Ethics 12 (2):75-76.
    Madeleine Simms begins her article by saying that it will attempt to `redress the balance' of views on the conflicting rights of handicapped children and their parents. I, on the other hand, will argue that no semblance of a balance has yet been achieved, and that her questions and conclusions merely serve to tip the scales further away from a genuine rights-based theory to a pragmatic utilitarian assessment of individual `worth'.
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  18. Emilie Dionne (2011). Review of Dangerous Discourses of Disability, Subjectivity, and Sexuality. By Margrit Shildrick. [REVIEW] Hypatia 26 (3):658-662.
  19. Claire Edwards (2013). The Anomalous Wellbeing of Disabled People: A Response. Topoi 32 (2):189-196.
    Disabled people frequently find themselves in situations where their quality of life and wellbeing is being measured or judged by others, whether in decisions about health care provision or assessments for social supports. Recent debates about wellbeing and how it might be assessed (through subjective and/or objective measures) have prompted a renewed focus on disabled people’s wellbeing because of its seemingly ‘anomalous’ nature; that is, whilst to external (objective) observers the wellbeing of disabled people appears poor, based on subjective assessments, (...)
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  20. Andrew Fenton & Timothy Krahn (2011). Review of Disability Bioethics: Moral Bodies, Moral Difference by Jackie Leach Scully. [REVIEW] Hypatia 26 (3):651-655.
  21. K. L. Flannery (2004). Marriage, Mental Handicap, and Sexuality. Studies in Christian Ethics 17 (3):11-26.
  22. Marilou Gagnon & Meryn Stuart (2009). Manufacturing Disability: HIV, Women and the Construction of Difference. Nursing Philosophy 10 (1):42-52.
    In 1998, the US Supreme Court first held that asymptomatic HIV infection constituted a disability when it ruled on the case of Bragdon v. Abbott . The use of yet another label (disabled) to identify women living with HIV has been rarely (if ever) questioned. While we do value the use of this label as an anti-discriminatory strategy, we believe that there is a need to examine how language and more specifically, the use of words such as disability, (...)
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  23. Michael Gard & Hayley Fitzgerald (2008). Tackling Murderball: Masculinity, Disability and the Big Screen. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 2 (2):126 – 141.
    The sport of wheelchair rugby is the subject of a recent film Murderball, which tells the story of the apparently intense rivalry between the Canadian and United States men's teams. In part, the story is told through the lives of some of the game's leading players and coaches. Murderball deals with a series of ethical and political questions concerned with conceptions of disability, articulations of sporting bodies, and the value attached to sporting performance. In this paper we offer a critique (...)
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  24. Rosemarie Garland-Thomson (2011). Misfits: A Feminist Materialist Disability Concept. Hypatia 26 (3):591-609.
    This article offers the critical concept misfit in an effort to further think through the lived identity and experience of disability as it is situated in place and time. The idea of a misfit and the situation of misfitting that I offer here elaborate a materialist feminist understanding of disability by extending a consideration of how the particularities of embodiment interact with the environment in its broadest sense, to include both its spatial and temporal aspects. The interrelated dynamics of fitting (...)
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  25. Anita Ghai (2002). Disabled Women: An Excluded Agenda of Indian Feminism. Hypatia 17 (3):49-66.
    : My purpose in this essay is to locate disabled women within the women's movement as well as the disability movement in India. While foregrounding the existential realities for disabled women in the Indian scene, I underscore the reasons for their absence from the agenda of Indian feminism. I conclude by reflecting on the possibilities of inclusion within Indian feminist thought.
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  26. Sara Goering (2008). 'You Say You're Happy, But…': Contested Quality of Life Judgments in Bioethics and Disability Studies. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (2/3):125-135.
    In this paper, I look at several examples that demonstrate what I see as a troubling tendency in much of mainstream bioethics to discount the views of disabled people. Following feminist political theorists who argue in favour of a stance of humility and sensitive inclusion for people who have been marginalized, I recommend that bioethicists adopt a presumption in favour of believing rather than discounting the claims of disabled people. By taking their claims at face value and engaging with disabled (...)
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  27. Roger S. Gottlieb (2002). The Tasks of Embodied Love: Moral Problems in Caring for Children with Disabilities. Hypatia 17 (3):225 - 236.
    Neither secular moral theory nor religious ethics have had much place for persons in need of constant physical help and cognitive support, nor for those who provide care for them. Writing as the father of a fourteen-year-old daughter with multiple disabilities, I will explore some of moral issues that arise here, both from the point of view of the disabled child and from that of the child's caretaker(s).
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  28. Stephen Greenspan (2002). A Sex Police for Adults with "Mental Retardation"? Comment on Spiecker and Steutel. Journal of Moral Education 31 (2):171-179.
    This article is a rebuttal of the claim by Spiecker and Steutel that sex between people with mild and moderate "mental retardation" is morally permissable only with the substitutive consent of caregivers. After a review of historical, empirical and practical considerations, an ethical analysis is undertaken which concludes that Spiecker and Steutel's arguments are deeply flawed and their proposed policy morally objectionable.
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  29. Kim Q. Hall (2005). Queerness, Disability, and The Vagina Monologues. Hypatia 20 (1):99-119.
  30. Kim Q. Hall (2005). Queerness, Disability, And. Hypatia 20 (1).
    : This paper questions the connection between vaginas and feminist embodiment in The Vagina Monologues and considers how the text both challenges and reinscribes (albeit unintentionally) systems of patriarchy, compulsory heterosexuality, and ableism. I use the Intersex Society of North America's critique as a point of departure and argue that the text offers theorists and activists in feminist, queer, and disability communities an opportunity to understand how power operates in both dominant discourses that degrade vaginas and strategies of feminist resistance (...)
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  31. Janell Hobson (2003). The "Batty" Politic: Toward an Aesthetics of the Black Female Body. Hypatia 18 (4):87-105.
    : I assess representations of black women's derrières, which are often depicted as grotesque, despite attempts by some black women artists to create a black feminist aesthetic that recognizes the black female body as beautiful and desirable. Utilizing a black feminist disability theory, I revisit the history of the Hottentot Venus, which contributed to the shaping of this representational trope, and I identify a recurring struggle among these artists to recover the "unmirrored" black female body.
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  32. M. Morgan Holmes (2008). Mind the Gaps: Intersex and (Re-Productive) Spaces in Disability Studies and Bioethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (2/3):169-181.
    With a few notable exceptions disability studies has not taken account of intersexuality, and it is principally through the lenses of feminist and queer-theory oriented ethical discussions but not through ‘straight’ bioethics that modes valuing intersex difference have been proposed. Meanwhile, the medical presupposition that intersex characteristics are inherently disabling to social viability remains the taken-for-granted truth from which clinical practice proceeds. In this paper I argue against bioethical perspectives that justify extensive and invasive pre- and post-natal medical interference to (...)
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  33. Christine James (2008). Philosophy of Disability. Essays in Philosophy 9 (1):1-10.
    Disability has been a topic of heightened philosophical interest in the last 30 years. Disability theory has enriched a broad range of sub-specializations in philosophy. The call for papers for this issue welcomed papers addressing questions on normalcy, medical ethics, public health, philosophy of education, aesthetics, philosophy of sport, philosophy of religion, and theories of knowledge. This issue of Essays in Philosophy includes nine essays that approach the philosophy of disability in three distinct ways: The first set of three essays (...)
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  34. Christine Kelly (2013). Building Bridges with Accessible Care: Disability Studies, Feminist Care Scholarship, and Beyond. Hypatia 28 (4):784-800.
    This article uses elements of autoethnography to theorize an in/formal support relationship between a friend with a physical disability, who uses attendant services, and me. Through thinking about our particular “frien-tendant” relationship, I find the common scholarly orientations toward “care” are inadequate. Starting from the conversations between feminist and disability perspectives on care, I build on previous work to further develop the theoretical framework of accessible care. Accessible care takes a critical, engaged approach that moves beyond understanding “accessibility” as merely (...)
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  35. Eva Kittay (2002). Love's Labor Revisited. Hypatia 17 (3):237 - 250.
    Love's Labor explores the relations that dependency work fosters between women and between men and women, and argues that dependency is not exceptional but integral to human life. The commentaries point to more facets of dependency such as the importance (and limitation) of personal narrative in philosophizing dependency (Ruddick); the role of spirituality that Gottlieb addresses with regard to his disabled daughter; and the application of the theory to the situation of elderly women (Tong).
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  36. Eva Feder Kittay (2011). Forever Small: The Strange Case of Ashley X. Hypatia 26 (3):610-631.
    I explore the ethics of altering the body of a child with severe cognitive disabilities in such a way that keeps the child “forever small.” The parents of Ashley, a girl of six with severe cognitive and developmental disabilities, in collaboration with her physicians and the Hospital Ethics Committee, chose to administer growth hormones that would inhibit her growth. They also decided to remove her uterus and breast buds, assuring that she would not go through the discomfort of menstruation and (...)
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  37. Eva Feder Kittay (2011). The Ethics of Care, Dependence, and Disability. Ratio Juris 24 (1):49-58.
    According to the most important theories of justice, personal dignity is closely related to independence, and the care that people with disabilities receive is seen as a way for them to achieve the greatest possible autonomy. However, human beings are naturally subject to periods of dependency, and people without disabilities are only “temporarily abled.” Instead of seeing assistance as a limitation, we consider it to be a resource at the basis of a vision of society that is able to account (...)
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  38. Eva Feder Kittay (2009). The Personal is Philosophical is Political: A Philosopher and Mother of a Cognitively Disabled Person Sends Notes From the Battlefield. Metaphilosophy 40 (3-4):606-627.
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  39. Eva Feder Kittay (2005). Equality, Dignity, and Disability. In Mary Ann Lyons & Fionnuala Waldron (eds.), (2005) Perspectives on Equality The Second Seamus Heaney Lectures. Dublin:. The Liffey Press,.
  40. Eva Feder Kittay (2002). Book Review: Anita Silvers, David Wasserman, and Mary B. Mahowald. Disability, Difference, and Discrimination: Perspectives on Justice in Bioethics and Public Policy. New York: Rowman & Littlefield, 1998. [REVIEW] Hypatia 17 (1):209-213.
  41. Eva Feder Kittay, Alexa Schriempf, Anita Silvers & Susan Wendell (2002). Introduction. Hypatia 17 (3):45-48.
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  42. Kate Lindemann (2001). Persons with Adult-Onset Head Injury: A Crucial Resource for Feminist Philosophers. Hypatia 16 (4):105-123.
    : The effects of head injury, even mild traumatic brain injury, are wide-ranging and profound. Persons with adult-onset head injury offer feminist philosophers important perspectives for philosophical methodology and philosophical research concerning personal identity, mind-body theories, and ethics. The needs of persons with head injury require the expansion of typical teaching strategies, and such adaptations appear beneficial to both disabled and non-disabled students.
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  43. Catriona Mackenzie & Jackie Leach Scully (2007). Moral Imagination, Disability and Embodiment. Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (4):335–351.
  44. Mary Mahowald (1998). Is Feminism Compatible with Advocacy for the Disabled? Social Philosophy Today 14:271-283.
  45. Mary B. Mahowald (2007). Prenatal Testing for Selection Against Disabilities. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (04):457-.
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  46. Mary B. Mahowald (2004). Book Review: Erik Parens and Adrienne Asch. Prenatal Testing: A Review of Prenatal Testing and Disability Rights, Washington, D.C.: Georgetown University Press, 2000; and Rayna Rapp. Testing Women, Testing the Fetus: The Social Impact of Amniocentesis in America. [REVIEW] Hypatia 19 (3):216-221.
  47. Helen Meekosha (2010). The Complex Balancing Act of Choice, Autonomy, Valued Life, and Rights: Bringing a Feminist Disability Perspective to Bioethics. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 3 (2):1-8.
    Disabled women were absent for many years from the discipline that has become known as women and gender studies. This field of study had its origins in the late 1970s following the second wave of feminism. In the latter decades of the twentieth century, disabled women and their allies introduced the necessary task of exploring disabled women's embodiment to the wider feminist community. A wealth of research now exists that incorporates disabled women's bodies into a range of disciplines: from literature, (...)
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  48. Helen Meekosha (2002). Virtual Activists? Women and the Making of Identities of Disability. Hypatia 17 (3):67-88.
    : This article examines the rise of a feminist engagement with the disability rights movement. Three realms of social being—individual, society, and the state—interact in the making of the identities of disability. The emergence of Women With Disabilities Australia (WWDA), suggests the ways women with disabilities come to identify with an autonomous women's group and the ways in which the particular forms of our activisms are produced.
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  49. Jenny Morris (2001). Impairment and Disability: Constructing an Ethics of Care That Promotes Human Rights. Hypatia 16 (4):1-16.
    : The social model of disability gives us the tools not only to challenge the discrimination and prejudice we face, but also to articulate the personal experience of impairment. Recognition of difference is therefore a key part of the assertion of our common humanity and of an ethics of care that promotes our human rights.
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  50. Amy Mullin (2006). Parents and Children: An Alternative to Selfless and Unconditional Love. Hypatia 21 (1):181-200.
    : I develop a model of love or care between children and their parents guided by experiences of parents, especially mothers, with disabilities. On this model, a caring relationship requires both parties to be aware of each other as a particular (not interchangeable) person and it requires reciprocity. This does not mean that children need to be able to articulate their interests, or that they need to be self-reflectively aware of their parents' interests or personhood. Instead, parents and children manifest (...)
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