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  1. Linda Martín Alcoff (2009). Discourses of Sexual Violence in a Global Framework. Philosophical Topics 37 (2):123-139.
    In this paper I make a preliminary analysis of Western (or global North) discourses on sexual violence, focusing on the important concepts of “consent” and “victim.” The concept of “consent” is widely used to determine whether sexual violence has occurred, and it is the focal point of debates over the legitimacy of statutory offenses and over the way we characterize sex work done under conditions involving economic desperation. The concept of “victim” is shunned by many feminists and nonfeminists alike for (...)
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  2. Floya Anthias & Pilar Rodríguez Martínez (eds.) (2006). Feminismos Periféricos: Discutiendo Las Categorías Sexo, Clase y Raza (y Etnicidad) Con Floya Anthias. Alhulia.
  3. Annette C. Baier (1995). A Note on Justice, Care, and Immigration Policy. Hypatia 10 (2):150 - 152.
    Should a "caring" immigration policy give special treatment to would-be immigrants who are near neighbors? It is argued that, while those on our borders requesting entry have some special claim, it should not drown out the claims of more distant applicants for citizenship.
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  4. Drucilla K. Barker (1998). Dualisms, Discourse, and Development. [REVIEW] Hypatia 13 (3):83 - 94.
    This essay reviews a body of literature on feminism, development, and knowledge construction. This literature rejects essentialist constructions of women, challenges the universality of the Western scientific method, and creates a discursive space for reconstructing the dualisms embedded in the modern worldview. It suggests that an understanding of knowledge systems other than the modern one can aid us in constructing epistemologies that result in less dominating ways of producing knowledge.
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  5. Françoise Baylis & Carolyn McLeod (2007). The Stem Cell Debate Continues: The Buying and Selling of Eggs for Research. Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (12):726-731.
    Now that stem cell scientists are clamouring for human eggs for cloning-based stem cell research, there is vigorous debate about the ethics of paying women for their eggs. Generally speaking, some claim that women should be paid a fair wage for their reproductive labour or tissues, while others argue against the further commodification of reproductive labour or tissues and worry about voluntariness among potential egg providers. Siding mainly with those who believe that women should be financially compensated for providing eggs (...)
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  6. Peter R. Beckman & Francine D'Amico (eds.) (1994). Women, Gender, and World Politics: Perspectives, Policies, and Prospects. Bergin & Garvey.
    Written as an introductory textbook for the study of world politics and the analysis of gender, this work is suitable for courses in International Relations, ...
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  7. Christina M. Bellon (2007). Globalizing Democracy and Human Rights by Carol Gould. Hypatia 22 (4):206-209.
  8. Christina Maria Bellon (2007). Globalizing Democracy and Human Rights (Review). Hypatia 22 (4):206-209.
  9. Asha Bhandary (2013). Adaptive Preferences and Women's Empowerment. By SERENE J. KHADER. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2011. Hypatia 28 (2):390-393.
  10. Cynthia Bisman & Christine Koggel (2012). Gender Justice and Development: Local and Global. Ethics and Social Welfare 6 (3):213-215.
  11. Birgit Christensen & tr Smith, Andrew F. (2005). Equality and Justice: Remarks on a Necessary Relationship. Hypatia 20 (2):155-163.
    : The processes associated with globalization have reinforced and even increased prevailing conditions of inequality among human beings with respect to their political, economic, cultural, and social opportunities. Yet—or perhaps precisely because of this trend—there has been, within political philosophy, an observable tendency to question whether equality in fact should be treated a as central value within a theory of justice. In response, I examine a number of nonegalitarian positions to try to show that the concept of equality cannot be (...)
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  12. Regina Cochrane (2014). Climate Change, Buen Vivir, and the Dialectic of Enlightenment: Toward a Feminist Critical Philosophy of Climate Justice. Hypatia 29 (3):576-598.
    This paper examines the proposal that the indigenous cosmovision of buen vivir (good living)—the “organizing principle” of Ecuador's 2008 and Bolivia's 2009 constitutional reforms—constitutes an appropriate basis for responding to climate change. Advocates of this approach blame climate change on a “civilizational crisis” that is fundamentally a crisis of modern Enlightenment reason. Certain Latin American feminists and indigenous women, however, question the implications, for women, of any proposed “civilizational shift” seeking to reverse the human separation from nonhuman nature wrought via (...)
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  13. Ann E. Cudd (2005). Missionary Positions. Hypatia 20 (4):164-182.
    : Postcolonial feminist scholars have described some Western feminist activism as imperialistic, drawing a comparison to the work of Christian missionaries from the West, who aided in the project of colonization and assimilation of non-Western cultures to Western ideas and practices. This comparison challenges feminists who advocate global human rights ideals or objective appraisals of social practices, in effect charging them with neocolonialism. This essay defends work on behalf of universal human rights, while granting that activists should recognize their limitations (...)
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  14. Monique Deveaux (2006). Gender and Justice in Multicultural Liberal States. OUP Oxford.
    Gender and Justice in Multicultural Liberal States explores the challenges that culturally plural liberal states face when they hold competing political commitments to cultural rights and sexual equality, and advances an argument for resolving such dilemmas through democratic dialogue and negotiation. Exploring recent examples of gendered cultural conflicts in South Africa, Canada, and Britain, this book shows that there is an urgent need for workable strategies to mediate the antagonisms between the cultural practices and arrangements of certain ethno-cultural and religious (...)
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  15. Jane Kani Edward (2013). Women and Human Rights in South Sudan. Journal of Catholic Social Thought 10 (1):91-115.
  16. Gardner Fair (1999). Sex and Social Justice. Social Theory and Practice 25 (2):344-352.
  17. Ann Ferguson (1998). Resisting the Veil of Privilege: Building Bridge Identities as an Ethico-Politics of Global Feminisms. Hypatia 13 (3):95 - 113.
    Northern researchers and service providers espousing modernist theories of development in order to understand and aid countries and peoples of the South ignore their own non-universal starting points of knowledge and their own vested interests. Universal ethics are rejected in favor of situated ethics, while a modified empowerment development model for aiding women in the South based on poststructuralism requires building a bridge identity politics to promote participatory democracy and challenge Northern power knowledges.
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  18. Marilyn Friedman (1999). Uma Narayan, Dislocating Cultures: Identities, Traditions, and Third World Feminism:Dislocating Cultures: Identities, Traditions, and Third World Feminism. Ethics 109 (3):668-671.
  19. Nanette Funk (1993). Feminism and Post-Communism. Hypatia 8 (4):85 - 88.
    Introduction to the special cluster of articles by feminists from Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union.
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  20. Anca Gheaus (2013). Care Drain as an Issue of Global Gender Justice. Ethical Perspectives 20 (1).
  21. Anca Gheaus (2013). Care Drain: Who Should Provide for the Children Left Behind? Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 16 (1):1-23.
    Care drain brings the traditional problem of carers' choice between paid work and family at a new level. Taking care drain from Romania as a case study, I analyse the consequences of parents' migration within a normative framework committed to meeting the needs of vulnerable individuals. The temporary migration of parents who cannot take their children with them involves moral harm, particularly the frustration of children's developmental and emotional needs. I use recent feminist work on justice and care in the (...)
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  22. Caitlin Guse (2010). 'Take Your Rosaries Out of Our Ovaries:' Women's Rights in Argentina and Bolivia. Constellations 1 (2).
    Despite being neighbouring countries, Bolivia and Argentina appear to be a world apart in terms of economics, international relations, and women’s rights. Historically, women’s rights have been fairly similar in both countries, but while one country seemingly made “progress,” the other country appeared to be stagnating. By exploring violence against women, and the current state of contraception and abortion laws it becomes apparent that “progress” does not necessarily bring about social change.
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  23. Peter Higgins, Audra King & April Shaw (2008). What is Poverty? In Rebecca Whisnant & Peggy DesAutels (eds.), Global Feminist Ethics: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory. Rowman & Littlefield.
    Invoking three desiderata (empirical adequacy, conceptual precision, and sensitivity to social positioning), this paper argues that poverty is best understood as the deprivation of certain human capabilities. It defends this way of conceiving of poverty against standard alternatives: lack of income, lack of resources, inequality, and social exclusion.
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  24. Alison M. Jaggar (2013). Does Poverty Wear a Woman's Face? Some Moral Dimensions of a Transnational Feminist Research Project. Hypatia 28 (2):240-256.
    This article explains some moral dimensions of a transnational feminist research project designed to provide a better standard or metric for measuring poverty across the world. The author is an investigator on this project. Poverty metrics incorporate moral judgments about what is necessary for a decent life, so justifying metrics requires moral argumentation. The article clarifies the moral aspects of poverty valuation, indicates some moral flaws in existing global poverty metrics, and outlines some conditions for a better global metric. It (...)
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  25. Alison M. Jaggar (2009). Transnational Cycles of Gendered Vulnerability. Philosophical Topics 37 (2):33-52.
    Across the world, the lives of men and women who are otherwise similarly situated tend to differ from each other systematically. Although gender disparities varywidely within and among regions, women everywhere are disproportionately vulnerable to poverty, abuse and political marginalization. This article proposes thatglobal gender disparities are caused by a network of norms, practices, policies, and institutions that include transnational as well as national elements. These interlaced and interacting factors frequently modify and sometimes even reduce gendered vulnerabilities but their overall (...)
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  26. Alison M. Jaggar (2002). A Feminist Critique of the Alleged Southern Debt. Hypatia 17 (4):119-142.
    : Neoliberal globalization has deepened the impoverishment and marginalization of many women. This system is maintained by the debt supposedly owed by many poor nations in the global South to a few rich nations in the global North, because the obligation to service the debt traps the people of the South within an economic order that severely disadvantages them. I offer several reasons for thinking that many of these alleged debt obligations are not morally binding, especially on Southern women.
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  27. Naila Kabeer (2012). Empowerment, Citizenship and Gender Justice: A Contribution to Locally Grounded Theories of Change in Women's Lives. Ethics and Social Welfare 6 (3):216-232.
    Struggles for gender justice by women's movements have sought to give legal recognition to gender equality at both national and international levels. However, such society-wide goals may have little resonance in the lives of individual men and women in contexts where a culture of individual rights is weak or missing and the stress is on the moral economy of kinship and community. While empowerment captures the myriad ways in which intended and unintended changes can enhance the ability of individual women (...)
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  28. R. Kamtekar (2002). Sex and Social Justice; Women and Human Development: The Capabilities Approach. Philosophical Review 111 (2):262-270.
  29. Tsachi Keren-Paz (2010). Poetic Justice: Why Sex-Slaves Should Be Allowed to Sue Ignorant Clients in Conversion. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 29 (3):307-336.
    In this article I argue that clients who purchase commercial sex from forced prostitutes should be strictly liable in tort towards the sex-slaves. Such an approach is both normatively defensible and doctrinally feasible. As I have argued elsewhere, fairness and equality demand that clients compensate sex-slaves even if one refuses to acknowledge that fault is involved in purchasing sex from a prostitute who might be forced. In this article I argue that such strict liability could be grounded in the tort (...)
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  30. Serene J. Khader (2011). Adaptive Preferences and Women's Empowerment. OUP USA.
    Women and other oppressed and deprived people sometimes collude with the forces that perpetuate injustice against them. Women's acceptance of their lesser claim on household resources like food, their positive attitudes toward clitoridectemy and infibulations, their acquiescence to violence at the hands of their husbands, and their sometimes fatalistic attitudes toward their own poverty or suffering are all examples of "adaptive preferences," wherein women participate in their own deprivation. -/- Adaptive Preferences and Women's Empowerment offers a definition of adaptive preference (...)
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  31. Serene J. Khader (2011). Beyond Inadvertent Ventriloquism: Caring Virtues for Anti-Paternalist Development Practice. Hypatia 26 (4):742-761.
    I argue that the epistemological virtues of concrete thinking, self-transparency, and narrative understanding developed by care ethicists can help international development practitioners combat their own temptations to engage in “unconscious unjustified paternalism” (UUP). I develop the concept of UUP—a type of paternalism in which one party unjustifiably substitutes her judgment for another's because of difficulty distinguishing her desires for the other from the other's good. I show that the temptation to UUP is endemic to development and that care ethics contains (...)
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  32. Eva Feder Kittay (2013). The Body as the Place of Care. In Donald A. Landes & Azucena Cruz-Pierre (eds.), Exploring the Work of Edward S. Casey. Bloomsbury Publishing,.
  33. Maria Lugones (2006). On Complex Communication. Hypatia 21 (3):75-85.
    : This essay examines liminality as space of which dominant groups largely are ignorant. The limen is at the edge of hardened structures, a place where transgression of the reigning order is possible. As such, it both offers communicative openings and presents communicative impasses to liminal beings. For the limen to be a coalitional space, complex communication is required. This requires praxical awareness of one's own multiplicity and a recognition of the other's opacity that does not attempt to assimilate it (...)
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  34. Anne McLeer (1998). Saving the Victim: Recuperating the Language of the Victim and Reassessing Global Feminism. Hypatia 13 (1):41 - 55.
    This paper reconsiders the use of the term "victim" in feminist theory to attempt to find common ground for the intersection and interconnection of Western and indigenous feminisms. The role of the victim in the discourse of victimology, a branch of criminology, is assessed and applied to the work of Rajeswari Sunder Rajan and Lata Mani who both examine the construction of women's subjectivity in the practice of "sati" in India.
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  35. Diana Tietjens Meyers (2011). Responsibility and Identity in Global Justice—Editor's Introduction. Hypatia 26 (4):667-671.
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  36. Angela R. Miles (1996). Integrative Feminisms: Building Global Visions, 1960s-1990s. Routledge.
    Integrative Feminisms presents a unique discussion of feminist radicalism in North America in the context of feminism's global development since the 1960s. Across divergent agendas, Angela Miles illuminates the transformative power she argues is common to apparently diverse radical, eco-, Black, socialist, lesbian and "third world" feminists. Drawing on interviews with activists, historical and documentary research, and her own participation, she provides powerful analysis of concentric feminisms in a transnational context. The book shows how transformative practices have led these various (...)
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  37. Kathy Miriam (2005). Stopping the Traffic in Women: Power, Agency and Abolition in Feminist Debates Over Sex-Trafficking. Journal of Social Philosophy 36 (1):1–17.
  38. Martha Nussbaum (1996). Feminism and Internationalism. Metaphilosophy 27 (1-2):202-208.
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  39. Martha C. Nussbaum (1998). Public Philosophy and International Feminism. Ethics 108 (4):762-796.
  40. Geraldine Pratt (2004). Working Feminism. Temple University Press.
    Working Feminism looks at key concepts and debates within feminist theory and puts them to work concretely in relation to the real problems faced by Filipina ...
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  41. Niamh Reilly (2007). Cosmopolitan Feminism and Human Rights. Hypatia 22 (4):180-198.
    : Reilly offers an account of cosmopolitan feminism as emancipatory political practice in an age of globalization. This entails a critical engagement with international human rights law; a global feminist consciousness that contests patriarchal, capitalist, and racist power dynamics in a context of neoliberal globalization; cross-boundaries dialogue that recognizes the intersectionality of forms of oppression; collaborative transnational strategizing on concrete issues; and the utilization of global forums as sites of cosmopolitan solidarity and citizen action.
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  42. Lani Roberts (2011). Are Women Human? And Other International Dialogues. By CATHARINE A. MACKINNON. Hypatia 26 (1):123-126.
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  43. David Schweickart, "Stakeholders and Terrorists: On Carol Gould's Democratizing Globalization and Human Rights".
    There are many things in this book that I like. I like Gould's basic philosophical framework--her "social ontology" of human beings conceived of as individuals-in-relation-- which was developed in her earlier works, Marx's Social Ontology and Rethinking Democracy. I like her use of a feminist "ethic of care" throughout, even to ground human rights. This latter move is surprising in light of Carol Gilligan's provocative (and in my view insightful) contrast between an ethic of rights (characteristic of conventional male moral (...)
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  44. Katharine Schweitzer (2013). Making Feminist Sense of the Global Justice Movement. By Catherine Eschle and Bice Maiguashca Lanham., Md.: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc., 2010. [REVIEW] Hypatia 28 (2):388-390.
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  45. Shari Stone-Mediatore (2009). Cross-Border Feminism: Shifting the Terms of Debate for Us and European Feminists. Journal of Global Ethics 5 (1):57 – 71.
    Recent decades of women's rights advocacy have produced numerous regional and international agreements for protecting women's security, including a UN convention that affirms the state's responsibility to protect key gender-specific rights, with no exceptions on the basis of culture or religion. At the same time, however, the focus on universal women's rights has enabled influential feminists in the United States to view women's rights in opposition to culture, and most often in opposition to other people's cultures. Not surprisingly, then, feminists (...)
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  46. Theresa W. Tobin (2011). Global Feminist Ethics. Edited by Rebecca Whisnant and Peggy DesAutels and Feminist Ethics and Social and Political Philosophy: Theorizing the Non-Ideal. Edited by Isa Tessman. Hypatia 26 (4):857-864.
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  47. Theresa Weynand Tobin (2007). On Their Own Ground: Strategies of Resistance for Sunni Muslim Women. Hypatia 22 (3):152-174.
    : Drawing from work in feminist moral philosophy, Tobin argues that the most common methodology used in practical ethics is a questionable methodology for addressing practical problems across diverse cultural contexts because the kind of impartiality it requires is neither feasible nor desirable. She then defends an alternative methodology for practical ethics in a global context and uses her proposed methodology to evaluate a problem that confronts many Sunni Muslim women around the world.
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  48. Joan C. Tronto (2002). The "Nanny" Question in Feminism. Hypatia 17 (2):34-51.
    : Are social movements responsible for their unfinished agendas? Feminist successes in opening the professions to women paved the way for the emergence of the upper middle-class two-career household. These households sometimes hire domestic servants to accomplish their child care work. If, as I shall argue, this practice is unjust and furthers social inequality, then it poses a moral problem for any feminist commitment to social justice.
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  49. Petra Tschakert & Mario Machado (2012). Gender Justice and Rights in Climate Change Adaptation: Opportunities and Pitfalls. Ethics and Social Welfare 6 (3):275-289.
    We present three rights-based approaches to research and policies on gender justice and equity in the context of climate change adaptation. After a short introduction, we describe the dominant discourse that frames climate change and provide an overview of the literature that has depicted women both as vulnerable victims of climatic change and as active agents in adaptive responses. Discussion follows on the shift from gendered impacts to gendered adaptive capacities and embodied experiences, highlighting the continuing impact of social biases (...)
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  50. Amelia Valcárcel Y. Bernaldo de Quirós (2008). Feminismo En El Mundo Global. Cátedra.
    En grandes números, la globalización beneficia a las mujeres. Pero no todo es de color de rosa: la falencia de los estados nacionales, los fundamentalismos y las deslocalizaciones perjudican. Globalizada no está la atención médica, porque todavía más de medio millón de mujeres mueren en el parto al año, pero sí lo está el tráfico y la trata, que trafican con mujeres desde cualquier parte del planeta para ponerlas a disposición allí donde paguen por usarlas. Digamos que la agenda feminista (...)
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