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  1. Linda A. Bell (2007). Visible Identities: Race, Gender, and the Self (Review). Hypatia 22 (2):196-200.
  2. Sandrine Berges (2013). Mothers and Independent Citizens: Making Sense of Wollstonecraft's Supposed Essentialism. Philosophical Papers 42 (3):259 - 284.
    Mary Wollstonecraft argues that women must be independent citizens, but that they cannot be that unless they fulfill certain duties as mothers. This is problematic in a number of ways, as argued by Laura Brace in a 2000 article. However, I argue that if we understand Wollstonecraft's concept of independence in a republican, rather than a liberal context, and at the same time pay close attention to her discussion of motherhood, a feminist reading of Wollstonecraft is not only possible but (...)
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  3. Marieke Borren (2013). Feminism as Revolutionary Practice: From Justice and the Politics of Recognition to Freedom. Hypatia 28 (1):197-214.
    In the 1980s extra-parliamentary social movements and critical theories of race, class, and gender added a new sociocultural understanding of justice—recognition—to the much older socioeconomic one. The best-known form of the struggle for recognition is the identity politics of disadvantaged groups. I argue that there is still another option to conceptualize their predicament, neglected in recent political philosophy, which understands exclusion not in terms of injustice, more particularly a lack of sociocultural recognition, but in terms of a lack of freedom. (...)
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  4. Judith Butler (1990). Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity. Routledge.
    Contemporary feminist debates over the meanings of gender lead time and again to a certain sense of trouble, as if the indeterminacy of gender might eventually culminate in the failure of feminism. Perhaps trouble need not carry such a ...
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  5. Anna Carastathis (2014). The Concept of Intersectionality in Feminist Theory. Philosophy Compass 9 (5):304-314.
    In feminist theory, intersectionality has become the predominant way of conceptualizing the relation between systems of oppression which construct our multiple identities and our social locations in hierarchies of power and privilege. The aim of this essay is to clarify the origins of intersectionality as a metaphor, and its theorization as a provisional concept in Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw’s work, followed by its uptake and mainstreaming as a paradigm by feminist theorists in a period marked by its widespread and rather unquestioned--if, (...)
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  6. Shirley Castelnuovo (1998). Feminism and the Female Body: Liberating the Amazon Within. L. Rienner Publishers.
  7. Lisa Cosgrove (2003). Feminism, Postmodernism, and Psychological Research. Hypatia 18 (3):85-112.
  8. A. Ferguson, Lesbian Identity - Beauvoir and History.
  9. Ann Ferguson (1998). Resisting the Veil of Privilege: Building Bridge Identities as an Ethico-Politics of Global Feminisms. Hypatia 13 (3):95 - 113.
    Northern researchers and service providers espousing modernist theories of development in order to understand and aid countries and peoples of the South ignore their own non-universal starting points of knowledge and their own vested interests. Universal ethics are rejected in favor of situated ethics, while a modified empowerment development model for aiding women in the South based on poststructuralism requires building a bridge identity politics to promote participatory democracy and challenge Northern power knowledges.
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  10. Ann Ferguson (1991). Sexual Democracy: Women, Oppression and Revolution. Westview.
    This is a book in feminist theory and social and political philosophy. Many of the chapters are versions of earlier papers published as journal articles and as book chapters. It presents a multi-systems theory of social domination, discussing three main ones: economic class, gender and (social) race. It presents a maerialist feminist theory of gender and sexuality and discusses lesbian identity as well as issues of motherhood.
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  11. Kathy E. Ferguson (2008). This Species Which is Not One : Identity Practices in Star Trek : Deep Space Nine. In Terrell Carver & Samuel Allen Chambers (eds.), Judith Butler's Precarious Politics: Critical Encounters. Routledge.
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  12. Diane L. Fowlkes (1997). Moving From Feminist Identity Politics To Coalition Politics Through a Feminist Materialist Standpoint of Intersubjectivity in Gloria Anzaldúa's Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza. Hypatia 12 (2):105-124.
    Identity politics deployed by lesbian feminists of color challenges the philosophy of the subject and white feminisms based on sisterhood, and in so doing opens a space where feminist coalition building is possible. I articulate connections between Gloria Anzaldúa's epistemological-political action tools of complex identity narration and mestiza form of intersubject, Nancy Hartsock's feminist materialist standpoint, and Seyla Benhabib's standpoint of intersubjectivity in relation to using feminist identity politics for feminist coalition politics.
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  13. Nancy Fraser (2007). Identity, Exclusion, and Critique A Response to Four Critics. European Journal of Political Theory 6 (3):305-338.
    In this article I reply to four critics. Responding to Linda Alcoff, I contend that my original two-dimensional framework discloses the entwinement of economic and cultural strands of subordination, while also illuminating the dangers of identity politics. Responding to James Bohman, I maintain that, with the addition of the third dimension of representation, my approach illuminates the structural exclusion of the global poor, the relation between justice and democracy, and the status of comprehensive theorizing. Responding to Nikolas Kompridis, I defend (...)
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  14. Marilyn Friedman (1999). Uma Narayan, Dislocating Cultures: Identities, Traditions, and Third World Feminism:Dislocating Cultures: Identities, Traditions, and Third World Feminism. Ethics 109 (3):668-671.
  15. Kevin M. Graham (2000). The Political Significance of Social Identity. Social Theory and Practice 26 (2):201-222.
  16. Sneja Marina Gunew & Anna Yeatman (eds.) (1993). Feminism and the Politics of Difference. Allen & Unwin.
  17. Susan Hekman (1999). Identity Crises: Identity, Identity Politics, and Beyond. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 2 (1).
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  18. Susan Hekman (1999). Identity Crises: Identity, Identity Politics, and Beyond. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 2 (1):3-26.
  19. Shriniwas Hemade (2012). Woman : An Etymological Study - Part One. Aajcha Sudharak - Marathi Publication Devoted to Rationalism (12):508-519.
    This article is about an etymological study of the concept "Woman" and leads towards Feminism. Written in Marathi for the first time ever. Published in a Rationalist Journal from Maharashtra. This is first part of the three parts.
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  20. Christina Hendricks (1997). Fluidizing the Mirror: Feminism and Identity Through Kristeva’s Looking Glass. Philosophy Today 41 (Suppl):79-89.
  21. Ada S. Jaarsma (2010). Rethinking the Secular in Feminist Marriage Debates. Studies in Social Justice 4 (1):47-66.
    The religious right often aligns its patriarchal opposition to same-sex marriage with the defence of religious freedom. In this article, I identify resources for confronting such prejudicial religiosity by surveying two predominant feminist approaches to same-sex marriage that are often assumed to be at odds: discourse ethics and queer critical theory. This comparative analysis opens up to view commitments that may not be fully recognizable from within either feminist framework: commitments to ideals of selfhood, to specific conceptions of justice, and (...)
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  22. Dawn Jakubowski (2004). Book Review: Susan Hekman. Feminism, Identity and Difference London: Frank Cass, 1999. [REVIEW] Hypatia 19 (2):170-171.
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  23. Serene J. Khader (2008). When Equality Justifies Women's Subjection: Luce Irigaray's Critique of Equality and the Fathers' Rights Movement. Hypatia 23 (4):pp. 48-74.
    The “fathers’ rights” movement represents policies that undermine women’s reproductive autonomy as furthering the cause of gender equality. Khader argues that this movement exploits two general weaknesses of equality claims identified by Luce Irigaray. She shows that Irigaray criticizes equality claims for their appeal to a genderneutral universal subject and for their acceptance of our existing symbolic repertoire. This article examines how the plaintiffs’ rhetoric in two contemporary “fathers’ rights” court cases takes advantage of these weaknesses.
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  24. Norma Claire Moruzzi (1994). A Problem with Headscarves: Contemporary Complexities of Political and Social Identity. Political Theory 22 (4):653-672.
  25. Amy Mullin (2007). Book Review: Private Selves, Public Identities: Reconsidering Identity Politics by Susan J. Hekman. [REVIEW] Hypatia 22 (2):204-207.
  26. Christine Overall (2012). Gender, Aspirational Identity, and Passing. In Dennis Cooley & Kelby Harrison (eds.), Passing/Out: Sexual Identity Veiled and Revealed. Ashgate Press.
  27. Shelley Tremain (2001). On the Government of Disability. Social Theory and Practice 27 (4):617-636.
  28. Allison Weir (2008). Global Feminism and Transformative Identity Politics. Hypatia 23 (4):pp. 110-133.
    In this paper, Weir reconsiders identity politics and their relation to feminist solidarity. She argues that the dimension of identity as “identification-with” has been the liberatory dimension of identity politics, and that this dimension has been overshadowed and displaced by a focus on identity as category. Weir addresses critiques of identification as a ground of solidarity, and sketches a model of identity and identity politics based not in sameness, but in transformative historical process.
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  29. Allison Weir (2008). Home and Identity: In Memory of Iris Marion Young. Hypatia 23 (3):pp. 4-21.
    Drawing on Iris Marion Young’s essay, “House and Home: Feminist Variations on a Theme,” Weir argues for an alternative ideal of home that involves: (1) the risk of connection, and of sustaining relationship through conflict; (2) relational identities, constituted through both relations of power and relations of mutuality, love, and flourishing; (3) relational autonomy: freedom as the capacity to be in relationships one desires, and freedom as expansion of self in relationship; and (4) connection to past and future, through reinterpretive (...)
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  30. William Wilkerson (2010). Neoliberalism, Biodiscipline, and Cultural Critique. Southern Journal of Philosophy 48 (s1):64-73.
    Responds to a paper delivered by Ladelle McWhorter at the Spindel Conference. Argues that we must be more careful in distinguishing Foucault's thought from feminist criticism.
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