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  1. Debra B. Bergoffen (2005). The Subject of Love. Hypatia 20 (2):202-207.
  2. Christopher Cohoon (2011). Coming Together: The Six Modes of Irigarayan Eros. Hypatia 26 (3):478-496.
    Luce Irigaray's provocative vision of eros is often expressed in what Elizabeth Grosz calls “rambling and apparently disconnected” language, and nowhere in Irigaray's texts is it presented as a coherent account. With the goal of elaborating the significance of Irigaray's vision, I here set out to construct such an account. After first defining the Irigarayan erotic encounter as a paradoxical conjunction of “separation and alliance,” I then aim to show that its structure may be productively interpreted in terms of six (...)
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  3. Julie Connolly (2010). Love in the Private: Axel Honneth, Feminism and the Politics of Recognition. Contemporary Political Theory 9 (4):414-433.
    Axel Honneth distinguishes between recognitive practices according to the social domain in which they occur and this allows him to theorise the relationship between power and recognition. 'Love-based recognition', which suggests the centrality of recognition to the relationships that nurture us in the first instance, is located in the family. Honneth argues that relationships encompassed by this category are pre-political, thereby repeating the distinction between the public and the private common to much political theory. This article explores the structure of (...)
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  4. Lisa Curtis-Wendlandt (2004). Conversing on Love: Text and Subtext in Tullia D'Aragona's. Hypatia 19 (4).
    : Few philosophical topics are as intertwined with gender questions as the topic of love, which moved center-stage in the diverse literary and philosophical productions of the Renaissance. Situated in the rich cultural environment of Cinquecento, Italy, Tullia d'Aragona's Dialogo della Infinità d'Amore offers not only a unique contribution to Renaissance theories of love, but also forces a reexamination of the aims and methods of communication, and provokes a reflection on philosophy's very own (male) self-conception.
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  5. Lisa Curtis-Wendlandt (2004). Conversing on Love: Text and Subtext in Tullia d'Aragona's Dialogo Della Infinit� d'Amore. Hypatia 19 (4):75-96.
    Few philosophical topics are as intertwined with gender questions as the topic of love, which moved center-stage in the diverse literary and philosophical productions of the Renaissance. Situated in the rich cultural environment of Cinquecento, Italy, Tullia d'Aragona's Dialogo della Infinità d'Amore offers not only a unique contribution to Renaissance theories of love, but also forces a reexamination of the aims and methods of communication, and provokes a reflection on philosophy's very own (male) self-conception.
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  6. Lisa Diedrich (2007). Doing Queer Love: Feminism, AIDS, and History. Theoria 54 (112):25-50.
    In this essay, I utilize the concept of the echo, as formulated in the historical and methodological work of Michel Foucault and Joan W. Scott, to help theorize the historical relationship between health feminism and AIDS activism. I trace the echoes between health feminism and AIDS activism in order to present a more complex history of both movements, and to try to think through the ways that the coming together of these two struggles in a particular place and time—New York (...)
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  7. Rosalyn Diprose (2009). Philosophy and Love: From Plato to Popular Culture by Linnell Secomb. Hypatia 24 (4):238-240.
  8. Ann Ferguson (2014). Feminist Love Politics: Romance, Care, and Solidarity. In Love--A Question for Feminism in the Twenty-First Century.
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  9. Ann Ferguson (2012). “Romantic Couple Love, the Affective Economy, and a Socialist-Feminist Vision” Taking Socialism Seriously. New York: Lexington Booksx. In Anatole Anton Anton & Richard Schmitt (eds.), Taking Socialism Seriously. Lexington Books. 67-84..
  10. Ann Ferguson (1991). Sexual Democracy: Women, Oppression and Revolution. Westview.
    This is a book in feminist theory and social and political philosophy. Many of the chapters are versions of earlier papers published as journal articles and as book chapters. It presents a multi-systems theory of social domination, discussing three main ones: economic class, gender and (social) race. It presents a maerialist feminist theory of gender and sexuality and discusses lesbian identity as well as issues of motherhood.
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  11. Marilyn Friedman (1998). Romantic Love and Personal Autonomy. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 22 (1):162-181.
  12. Ann Garry (1980). Why Are Love and Sex Philosophically Interesting? Metaphilosophy 11 (2):165–177.
  13. Deidre Nicole Green (2013). Works of Love in a World of Violence: Kierkegaard, Feminism, and the Limits of Self‐Sacrifice. Hypatia 28 (3):568-584.
    Feminist scholars adopt wide-ranging views of self-sacrifice: their critiques claim that women are inordinately affected by Christianity's valorization of self-sacrifice and that this traditional Christian value is inherently misogynistic and necrophilic. Although Søren Kierkegaard's Works of Love deems Christian love essentially sacrificial, love, in his view, sets significant limits on the role of self-sacrifice in human life. Through his proposed response to one who requests forgiveness, “Do you now truly love me?” Kierkegaard offers a model of forgiveness that subverts traditional (...)
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  14. Gill Kirkup (ed.) (2000). The Gendered Cyborg: A Reader. Routledge in Association with the Open University.
    The Gendered Cyborg brings together material from a variety of disciplines that analyze the relationship between gender and technoscience, and the way that this relationship is represented through ideas, language and visual imagery. The book opens with key feminist articles from the history and philosophy of science. They look at the ways that modern scientific thinking has constructed oppositional dualities such as objectivity/subjectivity, human/machine, nature/science, and male/female, and how these have constrained who can engage in science/technology and how they have (...)
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  15. Anne C. Klein (2002). On Love and Work: A Vow of Wholeness in Writing. Hypatia 17 (2):133-144.
    : Noting that academic writing typically falls in the category of work, this piece considers the relationship such writing might have with love. Animated by its observation that love's affinity with wholeness distinguishes it from work's tendency to divide a subject from herself, the essay playfully develops this contrast by telling a story of writing and wholeness. This story attempts to embody the contrasts of which it speaks, and in the process, to discover a counterpoint to the work of writing.
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  16. Linda LeMoncheck (2011). Feminism and Promiscuity. In Adrianne Leigh McEvoy (ed.), Sex, Love, and Friendship: Studies of the Society for the Philosophy of Sex and Love: 1993-2003. Rodopi.
  17. Susan Mendus (2000). Feminism and Emotion: Readings in Moral and Political Philosophy. St. Martin's Press.
    This book combines the insights of enlightenment thinking and feminist theory to explore the significance of love in modern philosophy. The author argues for the importance of emotion in general, and love in particular, to moral and political philosophy, pointing out that some of the central philosophers of the enlightment were committed to a moralized conception of love. However, she believes that feminism's insights arise not from its attribution of special and distinctive qualities to women, but from its recognition of (...)
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  18. Michael J. Monahan (2011). Emancipatory Affect. Clr James Journal 17 (1):102-111.
    Love is a recurring theme in bell hooks' thought, where it is explicitly linked to her understanding of freedom and liberation. In this essay, I will bring together some of hooks' most important writings on love in order to clarify her account of the relationship between love and liberation. I will argue that, for hooks, the practice of love and the practice of freedom are inextricably connected, and any liberatory project must be undertaken within the context of an ethics of (...)
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  19. Julie A. Nelson & Paula England (2002). Feminist Philosophies of Love and Work. Hypatia 17 (2):1-18.
    : Can work be done for pay, and still be loving? While many feminists believe that marketization inevitably leads to a degradation of social connections, we suggest that markets are themselves forms of social organization, and that even relationships of unequal power can sometimes include mutual respect. We call for increased attention to specific causes of suffering, such as greed, poverty, and subordination. We conclude with a summary of contributions to this Special Issue.
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  20. Shelley Park (2010). Cyborg Mothering. In Mothers Who Deliver: Feminist Interventions into Public and Interpersonal Discourse.
    As new communication technologies transform everyday life in the 21st century, personal, family, and other social relations are transformed with it. As a way of exploring the larger question, "how exactly does communication technology transform love and how love is lived?" here I explore the cell phone, instant messaging and other communication technologies as electronic extensions of maternal bodies connecting (cyber)mother to (cyber)children. -/- Feminist explorations of the marketing and use of cell phones, as well as other communication technologies, have (...)
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  21. Shelley M. Park (2013). Mothering Queerly, Queering Motherhood: Resisting Monomaternalism in Adoptive, Lesbian, Blended and Polygamous Families. SUNY.
    Bridging the gap between feminist studies of motherhood and queer theory, Mothering Queerly, Queering Motherhood articulates a provocative philosophy of queer kinship that need not be rooted in lesbian or gay sexual identities. Working from an interdisciplinary framework that incorporates feminist philosophy and queer, psychoanalytic, poststructuralist, and postcolonial theories, Shelley M. Park offers a powerful critique of an ideology she terms monomaternalism. Despite widespread cultural insistence that every child should have one—and only one—“real” mother, many contemporary family constellations do not (...)
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  22. Shelley M. Park (2005). Real (M)Othering: The Metaphysics of Maternity in Children's Literature. In Real (M)othering: The Metaphysics of Maternity in Children's Literature. In Sally Haslanger and Charlotte Witt, eds. Adoption Matters: Philosophical and Feminist Essays. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press. 171-194.
    This paper examines the complexity and fluidity of maternal identity through an examination of narratives about "real motherhood" found in children's literature. Focusing on the multiplicity of mothers in adoption, I question standard views of maternity in which gestational, genetic and social mothering all coincide in a single person. The shortcomings of traditional notions of motherhood are overcome by developing a fluid and inclusive conception of maternal reality as authored by a child's own perceptions.
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  23. John Wilson (1980). Love, Sex, & Feminism: A Philosophical Essay. Praeger.