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  1. Amy Allen (2008). Power and the Politics of Difference: Oppression, Empowerment, and Transnational Justice. Hypatia 23 (3):pp. 156-172.
    This paper examines Young’s conception of power, arguing that it is incomplete, in at least two ways. First, Young tends to equate the term power with the narrower notions of ‘ oppression ’ and ‘domination’. Thus, Young lacks a satisfactory analysis of individual and collective empowerment. Second, as Young herself admits, it is not obvious that her analysis of power can be useful in the context of thinking about transnational justice. Allen concludes by considering one way in which Young’s analysis (...)
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  2. Amy Allen (2008). Power and the Politics of Difference: Oppression, Empowerment, and Transnational Justice. Hypatia 23 (3):156-172.
  3. Judith Andre (1985). Power, Oppression and Gender. Social Theory and Practice 11 (1):107-122.
  4. Gloria Anzaldúa (1987). Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza. Aunt Lute.
    Borderlands/La Frontera deals with the psychology of resistance to oppression. The possibility of resistance is revealed by perceiving the self in the process of being oppressed as another face of the self in the process of resisting oppression. The new mestiza consciousness is born from this interplay between oppression and resistance. Resistance is understood as social, collective activity, by adding to Anzaldúa's theory the distinction between the act and the process of resistance.
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  5. Stephanie Athey (ed.) (2003). Sharpened Edge: Women of Color, Resistance, and Writing. Praeger.
  6. Maryann Ayim (1991). In Praise of Clutter as a Necessary Part of the Feminist Perspective. Hypatia 6 (2):211 - 215.
    A comment on Susan Wendell's paper "Oppression and Victimization; Choice and Responsibility" that appeared in Hypatia 5(3).
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  7. Harriet Baber, Complicity.
    There appear to be at least two important disanalogies between the situation of women and that of racial and ethnic minorities whose members are generally regarded as paradigmatic victims of oppression. First, in the case of oppressed racial and ethnic minorities it is relatively easy to identify the oppressors and the policies which serve to keep the oppressed in their place; it is not so easy to determine who the oppressors of women are--surely men are not universally blameworthy--nor even to (...)
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  8. Alison Bailey (1998). Privilege: Expanding on Marilyn Frye's Oppression. Journal of Social Philosophy 29 (3):104-119.
    This essay serves as both a response and embellishment of Marilyn Frye's now classic essay " Oppression." It is meant to pick up where this essay left off and to make connections between oppression, as Frye defines it, and the privileges that result from institutional structures. This essay tries to clarify one meaning of privilege that is lost in philosophical discussions of injustice. I develop a distinction between unearned privileges and earned advantages. Clarifying the meaning of privilege as unearned structural (...)
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  9. Lawrie Balfour (2005). Representative Women: Slavery, Citizenship, and Feminist Theory in Du Bois's “Damnation of Women”. Hypatia 20 (3):127-148.
  10. Sandra Bartky (1993). Reply to Commentators on Femininity and Domination. Hypatia 8 (1):192-196.
  11. Elizabeth Ann Bartlett (1989). Sarah Grimké: Letters on the Equality of the Sexes and Other Essays. Hypatia 4 (1):175-180.
  12. Mary Field Belenky, Blythe Mcvicker Clinchy, Nancy Rule Goldberger & Jill Mattuck Tarule (1988). Women's Ways of Knowing: The Development of Self, Voice, and Mind. Hypatia 3 (2):177-179.
  13. Macalester Bell (2005). A Woman's Scorn: Toward a Feminist Defense of Contempt as a Moral Emotion. Hypatia 20 (4):80-93.
  14. Macalester Bell (2000). A Woman's Scorn: Toward a Feminist Defense of Contempt as a Moral Emotion. Hypatia 20 (4):80-93.
  15. Paul Benson (2009). Analyzing Oppression. By ANN E. CUDD. Hypatia 24 (1):178-181.
  16. Paul Benson (2007). Feminism and the A-Word: Power and Community in the University. Hypatia 22 (4):223-229.
  17. Sandrine Bergès (2016). A Republican Housewife: Marie‐Jeanne Phlipon Roland on Women's Political Role. Hypatia 31 (1):107-122.
    In this paper I look at the philosophical struggles of one eighteenth-century woman writer to reconcile a desire and obvious capacity to participate in the creation of republican ideals and their applications on the one hand, and on the other a deeply held belief that women's role in a republic is confined to the domestic realm. I argue that Marie-Jeanne Phlipon Roland's philosophical writings—three unpublished essays, published and unpublished letters, as well as parts of her memoirs—suggest that even though she (...)
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  18. Sandrine Berges (2013). Mothers and Independent Citizens: Making Sense of Wollstonecraft's Supposed Essentialism. Philosophical Papers 42 (3):259 - 284.
    Mary Wollstonecraft argues that women must be independent citizens, but that they cannot be that unless they fulfill certain duties as mothers. This is problematic in a number of ways, as argued by Laura Brace in a 2000 article. However, I argue that if we understand Wollstonecraft's concept of independence in a republican, rather than a liberal context, and at the same time pay close attention to her discussion of motherhood, a feminist reading of Wollstonecraft is not only possible but (...)
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  19. Debra B. Bergoffen (1999). Marriage, Autonomy, and the Feminine Protest. Hypatia 14 (4):18-35.
  20. Talia Mae Bettcher (2009). Trans Identities and First-Person Authority. In Laurie Shrage (ed.), You've Changed: Sex Reassignment and Personal Identity. Oxford University Press
  21. Susan J. Brison (2006). Contentious Freedom: Sex Work and Social Construction. Hypatia 21 (4):192-200.
  22. Susan J. Brison (2001). Contentious Freedom: Sex Work and Social Construction. Hypatia 21 (4):192-200.
  23. Belinda Brooks-Grodon (2002). Suzanne M. Zeedyk, and Fiona E. Raitt, The Implicit Relation of Psychology and Law: Women and Syndrome Evidence. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 10 (2):195-197.
  24. Norma Broude (1997). Impressionism a Feminist Reading : The Gendering of Art, Science, and Nature in the Nineteenth Century.
  25. Wendy Brown (1990). Manhood and Politics. Hypatia 5 (3):175-180.
  26. E. L. Browne (1883). Emigration for Women.
  27. Elisabeth Burgos-Debray & Ann Wright (1994). I, Rigoberta Menchú: An Indian Woman in Guatemala. Hypatia 9 (2):225-229.
  28. Victoria I. Burke (2005). Hegel's Concept of Mutual Recognition: The Limits of Self-Determination. Philosophical Forum 36 (2):213-220.
    For Hegel, the ideal relation that two self-conscious beings might have to each other is one of reciprocal mutual recognition. According to Hegel, “a self-consciousness exists for [another] consciousness.” That is, self-consciousness is defined by its being recognized as self-conscious by another self-consciousness. In one formulation, Robert Pippin says that this means that “being a free agent consists in being recognized as one.” However, at the same time, Hegel values self-determination, which suggests a fundamental independence from others. The formative activity (...)
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  29. Sylvia Burrow (2005). The Political Structure of Emotion: From Dismissal to Dialogue. Hypatia 20 (4):27-43.
  30. Nadya Burton (1998). Resistance to Prevention: Reconsidering Feminist Antiviolence Rhetoric. In Stanley French, Wanda Teays & Laura Purdy (eds.), Violence Against Women: Philosophical Perspectives. Cornell University Press 182--200.
  31. Ann J. Cahill (2003). Feminist Pleasure and Feminine Beautification. Hypatia 18 (4):42-64.
  32. William E. Cain (1994). Making Feminist History the Literary Scholarship of Sandra M. Gilbert and Susan Gubar.
  33. Joan C. Callahan, Bonnie Mann & Sara Ruddick (2007). Editors' Introduction To. Hypatia 22 (1).
  34. V. J. Callan (1986). Single Women, Voluntary Childlessness and Perceptions About Life and Marriage. Journal of Biosocial Science 18 (4):479-487.
  35. Sue Campbell (1997). Women, “False” Memory, and Personal Identity. Hypatia 12 (2):51-82.
  36. Anna Carastathis (2012). Ladelle McWhorter, Racism and Sexual Oppression in Anglo-America. [REVIEW] Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 16 (1):250-256.
  37. Claudia Card (2004). The Atrocity Paradigm Revisited. Hypatia 19 (4):212 - 222.
    This essay reflects on issues raised by commentators regarding my book, The Atrocity Paradigm: A Theory of Evil (Oxford 2002). They are (1) Robin Schott's observation of the tension between my discussion of forgiveness and of castration fantasies; (2) Bat-Ami Bar On's questions regarding whether evil is ethical, political, or both; (3) Adam Morton's queries regarding the relative seriousness of evils and injustices; and (4) María Pía Lara's concerns regarding what is valuable in Kant's ethics.
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  38. Claudia F. Card (ed.) (1999). Feminist Ethics and Politics. University Press of Kansas.
  39. Samuel Allen Chambers (2008). Judith Butler and Political Theory: Troubling Politics. Routledge.
  40. Carol A. Chetkovich (2004). Women's Agency in a Context of Oppression: Assessing Strategies for Personal Action and Public Policy. Hypatia 19 (4):120-141.
    : Popular debates about "victim feminism" have receded but underlying concerns about the extent of gender inequality and usefulness of strategies highlighting difference are still relevant. This paper applies Susan Wendell's framework—relating to women's agency under conditions of oppression—to the experience of women firefighters. The framework fits well, but one case reveals the need to modify it by attending to community. An elaboration of the framework is then used to examine four policy issues.
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  41. David W. Concepción (2009). Overcoming Oppressive Self-Blame: Gray Agency in Underground Railroads. Hypatia 24 (1):81 - 99.
    After describing some key features of life in an underground railroad and the nature of gray agency, Concepción illustrates how survivors of relationship slavery can stop levying misplaced blame on themselves without giving up the valuable practice of blaming. Concepción concludes that by choosing a relatively non-oppressive account of self-blame, some amount of internalized oppression can be overcome and the double bind of agency-denial and self-loathing associated with being an oppressively grafted agent can be reduced.
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  42. Jane Monica Drexler (2007). Politics Improper: Iris Marion Young, Hannah Arendt, and the Power of Performativity. Hypatia 22 (4):1-15.
    : This essay explores the value of oppositional, performative political action in the context of oppression, domination, and exclusionary political spheres. Rather than adopting Iris Marion Young's approach, Drexler turns to Hannah Arendt's theories of political action in order to emphasize the capacity of political action as action to intervene in and disrupt the constricting, politically devitalizing, necrophilic normalizations of proceduralism and routine, and thus to reorient the importance of contestatory action as enabling and enacting creativity, spontaneity, and resistance.
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  43. Marian Eide (2008). "The Stigma of Nation": Feminist Just War, Privilege, and Responsibility. Hypatia 23 (2):pp. 48-60.
    If women are not yet accorded the full rights of citizenship internationally and especially in the military context, a feminist position on just war may have to be provisional. Drawing on Virginia Woolf's argument referenced in the title, Eide suggests in this essay that feminist theory develop its principles from women's exclusion from national privileges and argues that jus post bellum or justice after war be central to feminist theories of just war.
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  44. Barrett Emerick (2016). Empathy and a Life of Moral Endeavor. Hypatia 31 (1):171-186.
    Over the course of her career, Jean Harvey contributed many invaluable insights that help to make sense of both injustice and resistance. Specifically, she developed an account of what she called “civilized oppression,” which is pernicious in part because it can be difficult to perceive. One way that we ought to pursue what she calls a “life of moral endeavor” is by increasing our perceptual awareness of civilized oppression and ourselves as its agents. In this article I argue that one (...)
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  45. Barrett Emerick (2015). Perceptual Failure and a Life of Moral Endeavor. Social Philosophy Today 31:129-139.
    Over the course of her career, Jean Harvey argued that as agents engaged in a “life of moral endeavor,” we should understand ourselves and others to be moral works in progress, always possessing the potential to grow beyond and become more than the sum of our past wrongs. -/- In this paper I follow Harvey and argue that in order to live a life of moral endeavor, it is not enough merely to know about injustice. Instead, we must engage in (...)
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  46. Dana Freibach-Heifetz & Gila Stopler (2008). On Conceptual Dichotomies and Social Oppression. Philosophy and Social Criticism 34 (5):515-535.
    Ramat Gan Academic Center of Law and Business, Israel This article aims to expose the philosophical and cultural mechanisms, which allow some forms of western religion (in this case mainstream Christianity) to join hands with western capitalism in the oppression of women and of the needy. Focusing on the example of the USA, this article claims that both mainstream Christian religion and capitalism perpetuate and entrench discrimination against women and the oppression of the needy through the use of the cultural/philosophical (...)
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  47. Erinn Gilson (2011). Vulnerability, Ignorance, and Oppression. Hypatia 26 (2):308-332.
    This paper aims to understand the relationship between ignorance and vulnerability by drawing on recent work on the epistemology of ignorance. After elaborating how we might understand the importance of human vulnerability, I develop the claim that ignorance of vulnerability is produced through the pursuit of an ideal of invulnerability that involves both ethical and epistemological closure. The ignorance of vulnerability that is a prerequisite for such invulnerability is, I contend, a pervasive form of ignorance that underlies and grounds other (...)
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  48. Karen Green (1989). Prostitution, Exploitation and Taboo. Philosophy 64 (250):525 - 534.
    It is so generally accepted that prostitution is immoral, that this is one of the least discussed of all ethical issues. Few serious philosophical treatments of the subject have been published. Of these, at least one, Lars Ericsson's, ‘Charges against Prostitution’, throws into stark relief the apparent inconsistency of our community attitudes. For it demonstrates that, from the point of view of the simple free market liberalism, to which many subscribe, there is nothing immoral about prostitution. The prostitute is a (...)
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  49. Elizabeth Hackett & Sally Anne Haslanger (eds.) (2006). Theorizing Feminisms: A Reader. Oxford University Press.
    "What is sexist oppression?" "What should be done about it?" Organized around these questions, Theorizing Feminisms: A Reader provides an overview of theoretical feminist writing about the quest for gender justice. Incorporating both classic and cutting-edge material, the reader takes into account the full diversity of women, highlighting the effects of race, ethnicity, nationality, class, sexuality, and religion on women's experience. Theorizing Feminisms is organized into four sections and includes fifty-four essays. The first section introduces several basic concepts commonly employed (...)
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  50. Carol Hay (2013). Kantianism, Liberalism, and Feminism: Resisting Oppression. Palgrave Macmillan.
    This is a book about the harms of oppression, and about addressing these harms using the resources of liberalism and Kantianism. Its central thesis is that people who are oppressed are bound by the duty of self-respect to resist their own oppression. In it, I defend certain core ideals of the liberal tradition—specifically, the fundamental importance of autonomy and rationality, the intrinsic and inalienable dignity of the individual, and the duty of self-respect—making the case that these ideals are pivotal in (...)
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