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  1. David F. Austin (1999). (Sexual) Quotation Without (Sexual) Harassment?, Pornography in the College Classroom. In Vern Bullough & James Elias (eds.), Porn 101: Proceedings of the 1998 World Pornography Conference. Prometheus Books.
  2. Theodore Bach (2010). Pornography as Simulation. In Dave Monroe (ed.), Pornography: Philosophy for Everyone.
    This essay explains the prevalence of porn consumption by modeling it as a form of simulation. According to simulation theory (Gordon 1986, Goldman 2006) people predict and explain other’s behavior by using their own mind to model the mind of a target individual, much like an engineer might use a model aircraft to simulate the behavior of an actual aircraft. However, the cognitive mechanisms required for simulation have application outside of psychological interpretation. For example, it is plausible that while consuming (...)
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  3. Christopher Bartel (2012). Resolving the Gamer's Dilemma. Ethics and Information Technology 14 (1):11-16.
    Morgan Luck raises a potentially troubling problem for gamers who enjoy video games that allow the player to commit acts of virtual murder. The problem simply is that the arguments typically advanced to defend virtual murder in video games would appear to also support video games that allowed gamers to commit acts of virtual paedophilia. Luck’s arguments are persuasive, however, there is one line of argument that he does not consider, which may provide the relevant distinction: as virtual paedophilia involves (...)
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  4. Nancy Bauer (2007). Pornutopia. N+1 5:63-73.
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  5. Nancy Bauer (2006). How to Do Things With Pornography. In Sanford Shieh & Alice Crary (eds.), Reading Cavell.
  6. Shoshana Brassfield (2012). Overcoming Objectification: A Carnal Ethics. [REVIEW] Teaching Philosophy 35 (2):217-221.
    The central argument of Ann Cahill’s Overcoming Objectification is that the concept of sexual objectification should be replaced by Cahill’s concept of derivatization in order to better capture the wrongness of degrading images and practices without depending on an objectionably narrow and disembodied conception of self. To derivatize someone is not to treat her as a non-person, but rather to treat her as a derivative person, reducing her to an aspect of another’s being. Although not perfect, Cahill’s approach advances the (...)
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  7. Bob Brecher, Pornography: Men Possessing Women. A Reassessment.
    For a few years in the 1980s, Andrea Dworkin’s Pornography: Men Possessing Women appeared to have changed the intellectual landscape – as well as some people’s lives. Pornography, she argued, not only constitutes violence against women; it constitutes also the main conduit for such violence, of which rape is at once the prime example and the central image. In short, it is patriarchy’s most powerful weapon. Given that, feminists’ single most important task is to deal with pornography. By the early (...)
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  8. Claudia F. Card (ed.) (1999). Feminist Ethics and Politics. University Press of Kansas.
  9. Alisa L. Carse (1999). Pornography's Many Meanings: A Reply to C. M. Concepcion. Hypatia 14 (1):101-111.
    : C.M. Concepcion's review of "Pornography: An Uncivil Liberty?" (Carse 1995) fundamentally misconstrues the position defended in that article. This paper examines possible sources of this misconstrual, focusing critical attention on the narrowly crafted, morally loaded notion of "pornography" that figures centrally in the original argument under review. Pornography is not a category of speech that can be characterized as having one crucial meaning or message, nor is the message of pornography easily identifiable in instances of pornographic speech. This raises (...)
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  10. Susan Dwyer (2011). Review of Abigail Levin, The Cost of Free Speech: Pornography, Hate Speech, and Their Challenge to Liberalism. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2011 (2).
  11. Robert A. Dyal (1976). Is Pornography Good For You? Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 7 (3):95-118.
  12. A. W. Eaton (2007). A Sensible Antiporn Feminism. Ethics 117 (4):674-715.
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  13. Joel Feinberg (2009). The Feminist Case Against Pornography. In Steven M. Cahn (ed.), Exploring Ethics: An Introductory Anthology. Oxford University Press.
  14. Ann Garry (2002). Sex, Lies and Pornography. In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), Ethics in Practice.
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  15. Ann Garry (1978). Pornography and Respect for Women. Social Theory and Practice 4 (spring):395-421.
  16. P. Gilbert (2010). Sexual Solipsism: Philosophical Essays on Pornography and Objectification * by Rae Langton. Analysis 70 (3):597-599.
    (No abstract is available for this citation).
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  17. James Gould (1995). Pornography. Social Philosophy Today 10:221-228.
  18. Margret Grebowicz (2011). Democracy and Pornography: On Speech, Rights, Privacies, and Pleasures in Conflict. Hypatia 26 (1):150 - 165.
    This article investigates the intersections of secrecy/interiority, the state, and speech/ expression, and their implications for the rights of women. I propose a critique of commercial pornography that reanimates MacKinnon's claim that pornography and American democracy are in a relationship of mutual reinforcement, and incorporates poststructuralist (Lyotard, Baudrillard, and Butler) commitments to secrecy and unintelligibility, as well as their role in the production of pleasure.
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  19. Mane Hajdin (2011). Comments Onf Alan Soble's Pornography, Sex, and Feminism. In Adrianne Leigh McEvoy (ed.), Sex, Love, and Friendship: Studies of the Society for the Philosophy of Sex and Love: 1993-2003. Rodopi.
  20. Justin L. Harmon (2012). Dwelling In the House That Porn Built. Social Philosophy Today 28:115-130.
    This paper is a critique of pornography from within the framework of Heideggerian phenomenology. I contend that pornography is a pernicious form of technological discourse in which women are reduced to spectral and anonymous figures fulfilling a universal role, namely that of sexual subordination. Further, the danger of pornography is covered over in the public sphere as a result of the pervasive appeal to its status as mere fantasy. I argue that relegating the problem to the domain of fantasy is (...)
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  21. Jacob M. Held (2013). Pornography as Symptom. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 20 (1):15-27.
    Anti-Porn activists have argued for decades that pom is discrimination, it hamis women as a class. The Pro-porn response has been to dismiss these concems, laud the First Amendment, or argue that pornography is a valuable contribution to society. The debate has progressed little beyond this stage. In this article, I argue that it is time to frame the pomography debate as a discussion on sexualized media in general. Recent research indicates that the negative results often attributed to hard-core pornography, (...)
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  22. Jennifer Hornsby, Louise Antony, Jennifer Saul, Natalie Stoljar, Nellie Wieland & Rae Langton (2012). Review Symposium: Rae Langton, Sexual Solipsism: Philosophical Essays on Pornography and Objectification. Jurisprudence 2 (2):379-440.
  23. Catherine E. Hundleby (2011). Sexual Solipsism: Philosophical Essays on Pornography and Objectification. By Rae Langton. Hypatia 26 (1):224-227.
  24. Pilhong Hwang (2003). Liberal Pornographic Rights. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 17 (2):225-240.
    The conservative antipornographic premise (“defined and connected”) should be faulted for its groundlessness. Thus, conservative state censorship should be challenged by liberal individual rights to pornography and further by the value of moral harm. Along with the spirit of J. S. Mill’s harm principle, the right to free speech, including of course pornographic right, must prevail. And a number of feminist challenges to free pornographic rights are replied to in a variety of ways by some liberal thinkers who believe in (...)
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  25. Heather E. Keith (2001). Pornography Contextualized: A Test Case for a Feminist-Pragmatist Ethics. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 15 (2):122-136.
  26. Tsachi Keren-Paz (2010). Poetic Justice: Why Sex-Slaves Should Be Allowed to Sue Ignorant Clients in Conversion. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 29 (3):307-336.
    In this article I argue that clients who purchase commercial sex from forced prostitutes should be strictly liable in tort towards the sex-slaves. Such an approach is both normatively defensible and doctrinally feasible. As I have argued elsewhere, fairness and equality demand that clients compensate sex-slaves even if one refuses to acknowledge that fault is involved in purchasing sex from a prostitute who might be forced. In this article I argue that such strict liability could be grounded in the tort (...)
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  27. Niko Kolodny (2012). Raz's Nexus. Jurisprudence 2 (2):333-351.
    This section gathers together five reviews of Rae Langton?s book Sexual Solipsism: Philosophical Essays on Pornography and Objectification followed by a response from the author.
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  28. Hugh LaFollette (ed.) (1997). Pornography, Speech Acts, and Silence. Blackwell.
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  29. Rae Langton, Essay 3 Scorekeeping in a Pornographic Language Game.
    If, as many suppose, pornography changes people, a question arises as to how.1 One answer to this question offers a grand and noble vision. Inspired by the idea that pornography is speech, and inspired by a certain liberal ideal about the point of speech in political life, some theorists say that pornography contributes to that liberal ideal: pornography, even at its most violent and misogynistic, and even at its most harmful, is political speech that aims to express certain views about (...)
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  30. Rae Langton (2009). Sexual Solipsism: Philosophical Essays on Pornography and Objectification. OUP Oxford.
    Rae Langton here draws together her ground-breaking work on pornography and objectification. On pornography she argues from uncontroversial liberal premises to the controversial feminist conclusions that pornography subordinates and silences women, and that women have rights against pornography. On objectification she begins with the traditional idea that objectification involves treating a person as a thing, but then shows that it is through a kind of self-fulfilling projection of beliefs and perceptions of women as subordinate that women are made subordinate and (...)
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  31. Rae Langton (2000). Pornography and Free Speech. The Philosophers' Magazine 11 (11):41-42.
  32. Rae Langton (1993). Speech Acts and Unspeakable Acts. Philosophy and Public Affairs 22 (4):293-330.
  33. Rae Langton (1990). Whose Right? Ronald Dworkin, Women, and Pornographers. Philosophy and Public Affairs 19 (4):311-359.
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  34. Rae Langton & Caroline West (1999). Scorekeeping in a Pornographic Language Game. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 77 (3):303 – 319.
  35. Shen-yi Liao & Sara Protasi (2013). The Fictional Character of Pornography. In Hans Maes (ed.), Pornographic Art and the Aesthetics of Pornography. Palgrave Macmillan. 100-118.
    We refine a line of feminist criticism of pornography that focuses on pornographic works' pernicious effects. A.W. Eaton argues that inegalitarian pornography should be criticized because it is responsible for its consumers’ adoption of inegalitarian attitudes toward sex in the same way that other fictions are responsible for changes in their consumers’ attitudes. We argue that her argument can be improved with the recognition that different fictions can have different modes of persuasion. This is true of film and television: a (...)
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  36. Mary Kate Mcgowan (2014). Sincerity Silencing. Hypatia 29 (2):458-473.
    Catharine MacKinnon claims that pornography silences women in a way that violates the right to free speech. This claim is, of course, controversial, but if it is correct, then the very free speech reasons for protecting pornography appear also to afford reason to restrict it. For this reason, it has gained considerable attention. The philosophical literature thus far focuses on a type of silencing identified and analyzed by Jennifer Hornsby and Rae Langton (H&L). This article identifies, analyzes, and argues for (...)
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  37. Mary Kate McGowan (2009). Review of Rae Langton, Sexual Solipsism: Philosophical Essays on Pornography and Objectification. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (6).
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  38. Mary Kate McGowan (2005). On Pornography: MacKinnon, Speech Acts, and "False" Construction. Hypatia 20 (3):22 - 49.
    Although others have focused on Catharine MacKinnon's claim that pornography subordinates and silences women, I here focus on her claim that pornography constructs women's nature and that this construction is, in some sense, false. Since it is unclear how pornography, as speech, can construct facts and how constructed facts can nevertheless be false, MacKinnon's claim requires elucidation. Appealing to speech act theory, I introduce an analysis of the erroneous verdictive and use it to make sense of MacKinnon's constructionist claims. I (...)
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  39. Susan Mchugh (2012). Bitch, Bitch, Bitch: Personal Criticism, Feminist Theory, and Dog-Writing. Hypatia 27 (3):616-635.
    By the turn of the twenty-first century, women writing about electing to share their lives with female canines directly confront a strange sort of backlash. Even as their extensions of the feminist forms of personal criticism contribute to significant developments in theories of sex, gender, and species, they become targets of criticism as “indulgent” for focusing on their dogs. Comparing these elements in and around popular memoirs like Caroline Knapp's Pack of Two: The Intricate Bond between People and Dogs (1998) (...)
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  40. Mari Mikkola (2008). Contexts and Pornography. Analysis 68 (300):316-320.
    Jennifer Saul has argued that the speech acts approach to pornography, where pornography has the illocutionary force of subordinating women, is undermined by that very approach: if pornographic works are speech acts, they must be utterances in contexts; and if we take contexts seriously, it follows that only some pornographic viewings subordinate women. In an effort to defend the speech acts approach, Claudia Bianchi argues that Saul focuses on the wrong context to fix pornography’s illocutionary force. In response, I defend (...)
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  41. Christopher Morris (2013). Derrida on Pornography: Putting (It) Up for Sale. Derrida Today 6 (1):97-114.
    Over the past thirty years, academic debate over pornography in the discourses of feminism and cultural studies has foundered on questions of the performative and of the word's definition. In the polylogue of Droit de regards, pornography is defined as la mise en vente that is taking place in the act of exegesis in progress. (Wills's idiomatic English translation includes an ‘it’ that is absent in the French original). The definition in Droit de regards alludes to the word's etymology (writing (...)
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  42. Constance Mui (1998). Rethinking the Pornography Debate. Bulletin de la Société Américaine de Philosophie de Langue Française 10 (2):118-127.
  43. Gianluca Di Muzio (2006). The Immorality of Horror Films. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 20 (2):277-294.
    With the exception of pornography, the morality of popular forms of entertainment has not been studied extensively by philosophers. The present paper aims to start discussion on the moral status of horror films, whose popularity and success has grown steadily since the 1970s. In particular, the author focuses on so-called “slasher” or “gorefest” films, where the narration revolves around the graphic and realistic depiction of a series of murders. The paper’s main thesis is that it is immoral to produce, distribute, (...)
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  44. W. A. Parent (1990). A Second Look at Pornography and the Subordination of Women. Journal of Philosophy 87 (4):205-211.
  45. Stephanie L. Patridge (2013). Pornography, Ethics, and Video Games. Ethics and Information Technology 15 (1):25-34.
    In a recent and provocative essay, Christopher Bartel attempts to resolve the gamer’s dilemma. The dilemma, formulated by Morgan Luck, goes as follows: there is no principled distinction between virtual murder and virtual pedophilia. So, we’ll have to give up either our intuition that virtual murder is morally permissible—seemingly leaving us over-moralizing our gameplay—or our intuition that acts of virtual pedophilia are morally troubling—seemingly leaving us under-moralizing our game play. Bartel’s attempted resolution relies on establishing the following three theses: (1) (...)
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  46. Cristina Roadevin (2010). Sexual Solipsism: Philosophical Essays on Pornography and Objectification, by Rae Langton. Disputatio.
  47. Jennifer Saul (2006). Pornography, Speech Acts and Context. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 106 (2):227–246.
    Catharine MacKinnon has claimed that pornography is the subordination of women. Rae Langton has defended the plausibility and coherence of this claim by drawing on speech act theory. I argue that considering the role of context in speech acts poses serious problems for Langton's defence of MacKinnon. Langton's account can be altered in order to accommodate the role of context. Once this is done, however, her defence of MacKinnon no longer looks so plausible. Finally, I argue that the speech act (...)
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  48. Jennifer Mather Saul (2006). On Treating Things as People: Objectification, Pornography, and the History of the Vibrator. Hypatia 21 (2):45-61.
    : This article discusses recent feminist arguments for the possible existence of an interesting link between treating things as people (in the case of pornography) and treating people (especially women) as things. It argues, by way of a historical case study, that the connection is more complicated than these arguments have supposed. In addition, the essay suggests some possible general links between treatment of things and treatment of people.
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  49. Cynthia A. Stark (1997). Is Pornography an Action? Social Theory and Practice 23 (2):277-306.
  50. Mark Strasser (1990). Degradation, Pornography, and Immorality. Social Philosophy Today 4:339-353.
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