Related categories
Siblings:
96 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 96
  1. David M. Adams (2002). Book Review: Janet L. Dolgin. Families: Law, Gender and Difference and Defining the Family: Law, Technology, and Reproduction in an Uneasy Age. By New York: New York University Press, 1997. And David M. Estlund and Martha C. Nussbaum. Sex, Preference, and Family: Essays in Law and Nature. New York: Oxford University Press, 1997. [REVIEW] Hypatia 17 (3):254-256.
  2. Linda Alcoff (2008). Gender and Reproduction. Asian Journal of Women's Studies 14 (4):7-27.
    This paper provides a materialist approach to defining gender identity.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Anna Alichniewicz & Monika Michalowska (forthcoming). “The Angel of the House” in the Realm of ART: Feminist Approach to Oocyte and Spare Embryo Donation for Research. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy:1-7.
    The spectacular progress in assisted reproduction technology that has been witnessed for the past thirty years resulted in emerging new ethical dilemmas as well as the revision of some perennial ones. The paper aims at a feminist approach to oocyte and spare embryo donation for research. First, referring to different concepts of autonomy and informed consent, we discuss whether the decision to donate oocyte/embryo can truly be an autonomous choice of a female patient. Secondly, we argue the commonly adopted language (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Anita LaFrance Allen (1997). Book Review: Joan Callahan. Reproduction, Ethics, and the Law. Bloomington, In: Indiana University Press, 1995 and Laura Purdy. Reproducing Persons: Issues in Feminist Bioethics. And Kathy Rudy. Beyond Pro-Life and Pro-Choice. [REVIEW] Hypatia 12 (4):202-211.
  5. Elizabeth S. Anderson (1990). Is Women's Labor a Commodity? Philosophy and Public Affairs 19 (1):71-92.
  6. Adrienne Asch & Gail Geller (forthcoming). Feminism, Bioethics and Genetics. Feminism and Bioethics: Beyond Reproduction.
  7. S. Ashenden (2013). Reproblematising Relations of Agency and Coercion: Surrogacy. In Sumi Madhok, Anne Phillips & Kalpana Wilson (eds.), Gender, Agency, and Coercion. Palgrave Macmillan.
  8. Pauline B. Bart (1995). Seizing the Means of Reproduction. In Penny A. Weiss & Marilyn Friedman (eds.), Feminism and Community. Temple University Press. 105.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Françoise Baylis (2009). Forthcoming. Nonhuman Animal Eggs for Assisted Human Reproduction: A Woman's Choice. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 2 (2).
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Sonu Bedi (2011). Why a Criminal Prohibition on Sex Selective Abortions Amounts to a Thought Crime. Criminal Law and Philosophy 5 (3):349-360.
  11. Dana Belu, Sylvia Burrow & Elizabeth Soliday (2012). Introduction: Feminism, Autonomy, and Reproductive Technology. Techne 16 (1):1-2.
  12. Leslie Bender (1997). Feminism & Bioethics: Beyond Reproduction. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 25 (1):58-61.
  13. Laura Benkov (1996). Reproduction, Ethics, and the Law: Feminist Perspectives (Book). Ethics and Behavior 6 (3):265 – 267.
  14. Rosemary Betterton (2006). Promising Monsters: Pregnant Bodies, Artistic Subjectivity, and Maternal Imagination. Hypatia 21 (1):80-100.
    : This paper engages with theories of the monstrous maternal in feminist philosophy to explore how examples of visual art practice by Susan Hiller, Marc Quinn, Alison Lapper, Tracey Emin, and Cindy Sherman disrupt maternal ideals in visual culture through differently imagined body schema. By examining instances of the pregnant body represented in relation to maternal subjectivity, disability, abortion, and "prosthetic" pregnancy, it asks whether the "monstrous" can offer different kinds of figurations of the maternal that acknowledge the agency and (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Emanuela Bianchi (ed.) (1999). Is Feminist Philosophy Philosophy? Northwestern University Press.
    Drawing attention to the vexed relationship between feminist theory and philosophy, Is Feminist Philosophy Philosophy? demonstrates the spectrum of significant work being done at this contested boundary. The volume offers clear statements by seventeen distinguished scholars as well as a full range of philosophical approaches; it also presents feminist philosophers in conversation both as feminists and as philosophers, making the book accessible to a wide audience. -/- Table of Contents -/- Opening plenary: Drucilla Cornell, Jacques Derrida, and Teresa Brennan — (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Laura Bier (2010). " The Family Is a Factory": Gender, Citizenship, and the Regulation of Reproduction in Postwar Egypt. Feminist Studies 36 (2):404-432.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Susan Bordo (1997). The Body and the Reproduction of Femininity. In Katie Conboy Nadia Medina (ed.), Writing on the Body: Female Embodiment and Feminist Theory. 90--113.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Sarah-Vaughn Brakman & Sally J. Scholz (2006). Adoption, ART, and a Re-Conception of the Maternal Body: Toward Embodied Maternity. Hypatia 21 (1):54-73.
    : We criticize a view of maternity that equates the natural with the genetic and biological and show how such a practice overdetermines the maternal body and the maternal experience for women who are mothers through adoption and ART (Assisted Reproductive Technologies). As an alternative, we propose a new framework designed to rethink maternal bodies through the lens of feminist embodiment. Feminist embodied maternity, as we call it, stresses the particularity of experience through subjective embodiment. A feminist embodied maternity emphasizes (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Nuket Ornek Buken & Serap Sahinoglu (2012). Gender, Infertitlity, Motherhood, and Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) in Turkey. Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 16 (2):218-232.
    In Turkey, as in many other countries, infertility is generally regarded as a negative phenomenon in a woman’s life and is associated with a lot of stigma by society. In other words, female infertility and having a baby using Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ART) have to be taken into consideration with respect to gender, motherhood, social factors, religion and law. Yet if a woman chooses to use ART she has to deal with the consequences of her decision, such as being ostracized (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Sylvia Burrow (2012). Reproductive Autonomy and Reproductive Technology. Techné 16 (1):31-45.
    This paper presents a relational account of autonomy showing that a technological imperative impedes autonomy through undermining women’s capacity to resist use of technology in the context of labor and birth. A technological imperative encourages dependence on technology for reassurance whenever possible through creating a (i) separation of maternal and fetal interests; and (ii) perceived need to use technology whenever possible. In response I offer an account of how women might promote autonomy through cultivating self-trust and self-confidence. Autonomy is not (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Joan C. Callahan (ed.) (1995). Reproduction, Ethics, and the Law: Feminist Perspectives. Indiana University Press.
    The. Metamorphosis. of. Motherhood. Patricia. Smith. Motherhood, as traditionally understood, is obsolete. It is not yet as obsolete as, say, knighthood, but it is moving just as inevitably in the same direction. No one wants to admit that, but it is ...
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Joan C. Callahan (1990). Christine Overall, Ethics and Human Reproduction: A Feminist Analysis Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 10 (10):421-423.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Lisa Campo-Engelstein (2011). No More Larking Around! Why We Need Male LARCs. Hastings Center Report 41 (5):22-26.
    Modern contraceptives—especially long-acting, reversible contraceptives, or LARCs—are typically seen as a boon for humanity and for women, the majority of their users, in particular. But the disparity between the number and types of female and male LARCs is problematic for at least two reasons: first, because it forces women to assume most of the financial and health-related responsibilities of contraception, and second, because men’s reproductive autonomy is diminished by it. In order to understand how to change our current contraceptive arrangement, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Amanda R. Clarke (2011). Beyond Reproduction: Women's Health, Activism, and Public Policy. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 4 (2):159-164.
    In the current political climate, understanding women’s health is necessary to achieve progressive and equitable health care reform. Women access the healthcare system more frequently and in greater numbers than men, and are more likely to vote at the polls.1 Yet politicians, corporations, activists, and patients continue to disagree on the scope and definition of women’s health. In her book Beyond Reproduction: Women’s Health, Activism, and Public Policy, Karen L. Baird offers a retrospective analysis of the women’s health movement in (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Amanda R. Clarke (2011). Beyond Reproduction: Women's Health, Activism, and Public Policy. Karen L. Baird. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 4 (2):159-164.
  26. David DeGrazia (2011). Kaczor , Christopher . The Ethics of Abortion: Women's Rights, Human Life, and the Question of Justice .New York: Routledge, 2011. Pp. 246. $39.95 (Paper). [REVIEW] Ethics 121 (3):665-669.
  27. D. Dickenson (1997). Reproduction, Ethics and the Law: Feminist Perspectives. Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (5):329-329.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Patrice DiQuinzio (2007). Reconceiving Pregnancy and Childcare: Ethics, Experience, and Reproductive Labor by Amy Mullin. Hypatia 22 (3):204-209.
  29. Patrice DiQuinzio (2007). Reconceiving Pregnancy and Childcare: Ethics, Experience, and Reproductive Labor (Review). Hypatia 22 (3):204-209.
  30. Anne Donchin (2009). Toward a Gender-Sensitive Assisted Reproduction Policy. Bioethics 23 (1):28-38.
    The recent case of the UK woman who lost her legal struggle to be impregnated with her own frozen embryos, raises critical issues about the meaning of reproductive autonomy and the scope of regulatory practices. I revisit this case within the context of contemporary debate about the moral and legal dimensions of assisted reproduction. I argue that the gender neutral context that frames discussion of regulatory practices is unjust unless it gives appropriate consideration to the different positions women and men (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Anne Donchin (1997). Joan C. Callahan, Reproduction, Ethics, and the Law: Feminist Perspectives. [REVIEW] Human Studies 20 (4):459-466.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Anne Donchin (1989). Review: The Growing Feminist Debate Over the New Reproductive Technologies. [REVIEW] Hypatia 4 (3):136 - 149.
    A critical review of four recent works that reflect current conflicts and tensions among feminists regarding new reproductive technologies: In Search of Parenthood by Judith Lasker and Susan Borg; Ethics and Human Reproduction by Christine Overall; Made to Order, Patricia Spallone and Deborah Steinberg, eds. and Reproductive Technologies: Gender, Motherhood and Medicine, Michelle Stanworth, ed. Their positions are evaluated against the background of growing feminist dialogue about the future of reproduction and the bearing of reproductive innovations on such related (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Mel Duffy (2011). Lesbian Women's Experiences of Being Different in Irish Health Care. In Gill Thomson, Fiona Dykes & Soo Downe (eds.), Qualitative Research in Midwifery and Childbirth Phenomenological Approaches. Routledge.
  34. Michael Eisenbach & Ilan Tur‐Kaspa (1999). Do Human Eggs Attract Spermatozoa? Bioessays 21 (3):203-210.
  35. Dion Farquhar (1996). The Other Machine: Discourse and Reproductive Technologies. Routledge.
    With technological advances in reproduction no longer confined to the laboratory or involving only the isolated individual, women and men are increasingly resorting to a variety of technologies unheard of a few decades ago to assist them in becoming parents. The public at large, and feminists as a group, are confused and divided over how to view these technologies and over what positions to take on the moral and legal dilemmas they give rise to. Farquhar argues that two perspectives have (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Marie Fox (2009). The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 2008: Tinkering at the Margins. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 17 (3):333-344.
    This note suggests that, viewed from a feminist perspective, the reforms contained in the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 2008 represent a missed opportunity to re-think the appropriate model of regulation to govern fertility treatment and embryology research in the UK. It argues that reform of the legislation was driven largely by the government’s desire to avoid re-igniting controversies over the legal status of the embryo and abortion and to maintain Britain’s position at the forefront of embryo research and related (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Rachel Fredericks (2013). Review of Christine Overall, Why Have Children? The Ethical Debate. [REVIEW] Hypatia Reviews Online.
  38. Ann Garry (1983). Abortion: Models of Responsibility. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 2 (3):371 - 396.
    My focus within the topic of abortion is on several models that are used to support the position that a woman has a responsibility to sustain the fetus she carries because she brought about its existence. I consider the following models: a creator, strict liability, fault, and a contract. Although each of these models has been used by opponents of abortion to support the position that women should accept the consequences of engaging in sexual intercourse, I argue that none of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Patricia Adair Gowaty (1992). Evolutionary Biology and Feminism. Human Nature 3 (3):217-249.
    Evolutionary biology and feminism share a variety of philosophical and practical concerns. I have tried to describe how a perspective from both evolutionary biology and feminism can accelerate the achievement of goals for both feminists and evolutionary biologists. In an early section of this paper I discuss the importance of variation to the disciplines of evolutionary biology and feminism. In the section entitled “Control of Female Reproduction” I demonstrate how insight provided by participation in life as woman and also as (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Lisa Guenther (2012). Fecundity and Natal Alienation: Rethinking Kinship with Emmanuel Levinas and Orlando Patterson. Levinas Studies 7 (1):1-19.
    In his 1934 essay, “Reflections on the Philosophy of Hitlerism,” Levinas raises important questions about the subject’s relation to nature and to history. His account of the ethical significance of paternity, maternity, and fraternity in texts such as Totality and Infinity and Otherwise Than Being suggest powerful new ways to understand the meaning of kinship, beyond the abstractions of Western liberalism. How does this analysis of race and kinship translate into the context of the Transatlantic slave trade, which not only (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Lisa Guenther (2006). The Gift of the Other: Levinas and the Politics of Reproduction. SUNY Press.
    The Gift of the Other brings together a philosophical analysis of time, embodiment, and ethical responsibility with a feminist critique of the way women’s reproductive capacity has been theorized and represented in Western culture. Author Lisa Guenther develops the ethical and temporal implications of understanding birth as the gift of the Other, a gift which makes existence possible, and already orients this existence toward a radical responsibility for Others. Through an engagement with the work of Levinas, Beauvoir, Arendt, Irigaray, and (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Jyotsna Agnihotri Gupta & Annemiek Richters (2008). Embodied Subjects and Fragmented Objects: Women's Bodies, Assisted Reproduction Technologies and the Right to Self-Determination. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (4):239-249.
    This article focuses on the transformation of the female reproductive body with the use of assisted reproduction technologies under neo-liberal economic globalisation, wherein the ideology of trade without borders is central, as well as under liberal feminist ideals, wherein the right to self-determination is central. Two aspects of the body in western medicine—the fragmented body and the commodified body, and the integral relation between these two—are highlighted. This is done in order to analyse the implications of local and global transactions (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Patrick Hanafin (2006). Gender, Citizenship and Human Reproduction in Contemporary Italy. Feminist Legal Studies 14 (3):329-352.
    This article examines how the recently introduced law on assisted reproduction in Italy, which gives symbolic legal recognition to the embryo, came about, and how a referendum, which would have repealed large sections of it, failed. The occupation of the legal space by the embryo is the outcome of a crusade by a well-organised alliance of theo-conservatives. These groups see in reproductive medicine an uncontrolled interference with their notion of the natural order of things. Such a worldview requires a total (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Sarah Lucia Hoagland (2007). Review Essay: Undivided Rights: Women of Color Organize for Reproductive Justice, Edited by Jael Silliman, Marlene Gerber Fried, Loretta Ross, and Elena R. Guti�Rrez; Policing the National Body: Race, Gender and Criminalization, Edited by Jael Silliman and Anannya Bhattacharjee; and Conquest: Sexual Violence and American Indian Genocide, by Andrea Smith. Hypatia 22 (2):182-188.
  45. T. Hoquet (2010). Is Sociobiology Amendable? Feminist and Darwinian Women Biologists Confront the Paradigm of Sexual Selection. Diogenes 57 (1):113-126.
    Is it possible to be a socio-biologist and a feminist? Socio-biology has been accused of being a macho ideological arsenal, which seems to exclude in advance any possibility of amending it. However that was the project of several female researchers (in particular S. B. Hrdy and P. A. Gowaty), who suggested adopting the science’s theoretical framework in order to change it from within. This has been expressed in a change of focus: an appeal to take account of female strategies and (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Kirsty Horsey (2003). Emily Jackson, Regulating Reproduction: Law, Technology and Autonomy, Oxford: Hart Publishing, 2001. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 11 (3):311-314.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Jane Clare Jones (2012). Idealized and Industrialized Labor: Anatomy of a Feminist Controversy. Hypatia 27 (1):99-117.
    Prompted by the ever-increasing cesarean rate, this paper considers the interpretive disjunct between two significant strands of feminist analysis that have arisen in the last four decades as a consequence of the phenomenon of medicalized birth. In contrast to the dominant paradigm of bioethical “Principalism,” both modes of analysis, understood as “the critique of industrialized labor” and “the critique of idealized labor,” are attentive to the way in which social discourses inform bioethical deliberation and practice, but significantly diverge in the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Serene J. Khader (2013). Intersectionality and the Ethics of Transnational Commercial Surrogacy. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 6 (1):68-90.
    Critics of transnational commercial surrogacy frequently call our attention to the race, class, and cultural background of surrogates in the global South. Consider the following sampling from the critics: "the women having babies for rich Westerners have been pimped by their husbands and are powerless to resist" (Bindel 2011); our "rules of decency seem to differ when the women in question are living in abject poverty half a world away" (Warner 2008); and we should worry that "women of color are (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Serene J. Khader (2008). When Equality Justifies Women's Subjection: Luce Irigaray's Critique of Equality and the Fathers' Rights Movement. Hypatia 23 (4):pp. 48-74.
    The “fathers’ rights” movement represents policies that undermine women’s reproductive autonomy as furthering the cause of gender equality. Khader argues that this movement exploits two general weaknesses of equality claims identified by Luce Irigaray. She shows that Irigaray criticizes equality claims for their appeal to a genderneutral universal subject and for their acceptance of our existing symbolic repertoire. This article examines how the plaintiffs’ rhetoric in two contemporary “fathers’ rights” court cases takes advantage of these weaknesses.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Melissa M. Kozma & Jeanine Weekes Schroer (forthcoming). Purposeful Nonsense, Intersectionality, and the Mission to Save Black Babies. In Namita Goswami, Maeve O'Donavan & Lisa Yount (eds.), Why Race and Gender Still Matter: An Intersectional Approach. Pickering & Chatto Ltd.
    The competing expressions of ideology flooding the contemporary political landscape have taken a turn toward the absurd. The Radiance Foundation’s recent anti-abortion campaign targeting African-American women, including a series of billboards bearing the slogan “The most dangerous place for an African-American child is in the womb”, is just one example of political "discourse" that is both infuriating and confounding. Discourse with these features – problematic intelligibility, disinterest in the truth, and inflammatory rhetoric – has become increasingly common in politics, the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 96