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  1. Pamela Abbott & Claire Wallace (eds.) (1991). Gender, Power, and Sexuality. Macmillan.
  2. Barbara S. Andrew (2001). Identity Without Selfhood: Bisexuality and Simone de Beauvoir (Review). Hypatia 16 (3):161-163.
  3. Katherine Angel (2012). Contested Psychiatric Ontology and Feminist Critique 'Female Sexual Dysfunction'and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual. History of the Human Sciences 25 (4):3-24.
    In this article I discuss the emergence of Female Sexual Dysfunction (FSD) within American psychiatry and beyond in the postwar period, setting out what I believe to be important and suggestive questions neglected in existing scholarship. Tracing the nomenclature within successive editions of the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM), I consider the reification of the term ‘FSD’, and the activism and scholarship that the rise of the category has occasioned. I suggest that analysis of FSD benefits from (...)
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  4. Grant Babcock, 16. “Libertarianism, Feminism, and Nonviolent Action: A Synthesis”.
    There is a need to develop libertarian responses to writings on race, gender, and sexual orientation. Offering such responses not only demonstrates to potential opponents..
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  5. Alison Bailey (2005). Book Review: Chris Cuomo. The Philosopher Queen: Feminist Essays on War, Love, and Knowledge. Lanham, Md.: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers, Inc., 2003. [REVIEW] Hypatia 20 (3):218-221.
    The Philosopher Queen: Feminist Essays on War, Love, and Knowledge. By Chris Cuomo. Lanham, Md.: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers, Inc., 2003. The Philosopher Queen is a powerful illustration of what Cherríe Moraga calls a "theory in the flesh." That is, theorizing from a place where "physical realities of our lives—our skin color, the land or concrete we grow up on, our sexual longings—all fuse to create a politic [and, I would add, an ethics, spirituality, and epistemology] born out of necessity" (...)
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  6. Kelly H. Ball (2013). &Quot;more or Less Raped&Quot;: Foucault, Causality, and Feminist Critiques of Sexual Violence. philoSOPHIA 3 (1):14.
  7. Kelly H. Ball (2009). Producing Populations: Biopolitics, The Family, and Experiences of Queer Foster Youth. Journal of Family Life.
  8. Nancy Bauer (2007). Pornutopia. N+1 5:63-73.
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  9. Susan E. Bernick (1992). The Logic of the Development of Feminism; Or, Is MacKinnon to Feminism as Parmenides Is to Greek Philosophy? Hypatia 7 (1):1 - 15.
    Catharine MacKinnon's investigation of the role of sexuality in the subordination of women is a logical culmination of radical feminist thought. If this is correct, the position of her work relative to radical feminism is analogous to the place Parmenides's work occupied in ancient Greek philosophy. Critics of MacKinnon's work have missed their target completely and must engage her work in a different way if feminist theory is to progress past its current stalemated malaise.
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  10. Rosi Braidotti (2011). Nomadic Subjects: Embodiment and Sexual Difference in Contemporary Feminist Theory. Columbia University Press.
    Introduction -- By way of nomadism -- Context and generations -- Sexual difference theory -- On the female feminist subject : from "she-self" to "she-other" -- Sexual difference as a nomadic political project -- Organs without bodies -- Images without imagination -- Mothers, monsters, and machines -- Discontinuous becomings : Deleuze and the becoming-woman of philosophy -- Envy and ingratitude: men in feminism -- Conclusion. Geometries of passion : a conversation.
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  11. Louise Brossard (2005). Trois Perspectives Lesbiennes Féministes Articulant le Sexe, la Sexualité Et les Rapports Sociaux de Sexe: Rich, Wittig, Butler. Institut de Recherches Et d'Études Féministes.
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  12. Keith Burgess‐Jackson (1999). Linda LeMoncheck, Loose Women, Lecherous Men: A Feminist Philosophy of Sex:Loose Women, Lecherous Men: A Feminist Philosophy of Sex. Ethics 110 (1):211-215.
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  13. Judith Butler (1990). Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity. Routledge.
    Contemporary feminist debates over the meanings of gender lead time and again to a certain sense of trouble, as if the indeterminacy of gender might eventually culminate in the failure of feminism. Perhaps trouble need not carry such a ...
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  14. Ann J. Cahill (2014). Recognition, Desire, and Unjust Sex. Hypatia 29 (2):303-319.
    In this article I will revisit the question of what I term the continuum of heteronormative sexual interactions, that is, the idea that purportedly ethically acceptable heterosexual interactions are conceptually, ethically, and politically associated with instances of sexual violence. Spurred by recent work by psychologist Nicola , I conclude that some of my earlier critiques of Catharine MacKinnon's theoretical linkages between sexual violence and normative heterosex are wanting. In addition, neither MacKinnon's theory nor my critique of it seem up to (...)
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  15. Cheshire Calhoun (2002). Feminism, the Family, and the Politics of the Closet: Lesbian and Gay Displacement. OUP Oxford.
    Feminism, the Family, and the Politics of the Closet is about placing sexual orientation politics within feminist theorizing. It is also about defining the central political issues confronting lesbians and gay men. The book brings the study of lesbians from the margins of feminist theory to the center by critiquing the analytic frameworks employed within feminist theory that renders invisible lesbians' difference from heterosexual women. This book also outlines the basic features of lesbian and gay subordination by exploring the differences (...)
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  16. Joan Callahan, Bonnie Mann & Sara Ruddick (2007). Editors' Introduction to Writing Against Heterosexism. Hypatia 22 (1).
  17. Jan Campbell (2000). Arguing with the Phallus: Feminist, Queer, and Postcolonial Theory: A Psychoanalytic Contribution. Distributed in the Usa Exclusively by St. Martin's Press.
    What can psychoanalysis offer contemporary arguments in the fields of Feminism, Queer Theory and Post-Colonialism? Jan Campbell introduces and analyses the way that psychoanalysis has developed and made problematic models of subjectivity linked to issues of sexuality, ethnicity, gender, and history. Via discussions of such influential and diverse figures as Lacan, Irigaray, Kristeva, Dollimore, Bhabha, Toni Morrison, and Alice Walker, Campbell uses psychoanalysis as a mediatory tool in a range of debates across the human sciences, while also arguing for a (...)
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  18. Claudia Card (2000). Drucilla Cornell, At the Heart of Freedom: Feminism, Sex, and Equality:At the Heart of Freedom: Feminism, Sex, and Equality. Ethics 110 (3):607-609.
  19. Rey Chow (2003). Sexuality. In Mary Eagleton (ed.), A Concise Companion to Feminist Theory. Blackwell.
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  20. Cheryl H. Cohen (1986). The Feminist Sexuality Debate: Ethics and Politics. Hypatia 1 (2):71 - 86.
    The purpose of this paper is to offer a critical evaluation of representative positions in the feminst sexuality debate and to suggest that ethical considerations are essential to the complex task of political transformation which is the goal of both sides in the debate. This paper explores both a "rights view" of ethics and a "responsibilities view" and shows, through specific examples, how an appeal to ethics might take feminist sexual politics beyond the current debate.
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  21. Claire Colebrook (1997). Feminist Philosophy and the Philosophy of Feminism: Irigaray and the History of Western Metaphysics. Hypatia 12 (1):79 - 98.
  22. Mark Anthony Dacela & Rachel Joy Martinez Rodriquez, Sekswalidad, Kapangyarihan, at Gangbang: Isang Panunuring Foucauldian ng Pagbalikwas ni Annabel Chong1.
    Noong Enero 1995, sa edad na 22, gumawa ng pandaigdigang rekord (na magmula noo’y nalampasan na) si Annabel Chong sa pagkakaroon ng pinakamaraming bilang ng pakikipagtalik at iba’t ibang gawaing sekswal, 251 sa tinatayang 70 kalalakihan sa loob ng tinatayang sampung oras para sa pelikulang pinamagatang World’s Biggest Gangbang. Nang lumaon, ipinahayag ni Chong sa mga interbyu na higit sa anupaman, ginawa niya ito para hamunin ang kinahong paniniwalang pasibo ang pambabaeng sekswalidad—na gusto ng kababaihan na “inaakit, hinahalikan at niyayakap, (...)
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  23. Maria del Guadalupe Davidson, Kathryn T. Gines & Donna-Dale L. Marcano (eds.) (2010). Convergences: Black Feminism and Continental Philosophy. SUNY Press.
    A range of themes—race and gender, sexuality, otherness, sisterhood, and agency—run throughout this collection, and the chapters constitute a collective discourse at the intersection of Black feminist thought and continental philosophy, converging on a similar set of questions and concerns. These convergences are not random or forced, but are in many ways natural and necessary: the same issues of agency, identity, alienation, and power inevitably are addressed by both camps. Never before has a group of scholars worked together to examine (...)
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  24. Karen Elizabeth Davis (1990). I Love Myself When I Am Laughing: A New Paradigm for Sex. Journal of Social Philosophy 21 (2-3):5-24.
  25. Lisa Diedrich (2007). Doing Queer Love: Feminism, AIDS, and History. Theoria 54 (112):25-50.
    In this essay, I utilize the concept of the echo, as formulated in the historical and methodological work of Michel Foucault and Joan W. Scott, to help theorize the historical relationship between health feminism and AIDS activism. I trace the echoes between health feminism and AIDS activism in order to present a more complex history of both movements, and to try to think through the ways that the coming together of these two struggles in a particular place and time—New York (...)
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  26. Louise Du Toit (2012). Sexual Specificity, Rape Law Reform and the Feminist Quest for Justice. South African Journal of Philosophy 31 (3):465-483.
    Recent rape law reform is most saliently characterised by a turn to gender neutrality in its definition of the crime of rape. The few possible advantages of a gender neutral approach to rape are offset by a series of disadvantages regarding gender justice when viewed from a feminist perspective. Formal gender neutrality does not safeguard against the effective influence of pervasive and enduring symbolic constructions pertaining to male and female sexuality and of a normalised hierarchical binary constructed between the two (...)
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  27. Nancy Duncan (ed.) (1996). Bodyspace: Destabilizing Geographies of Gender and Sexuality. Routledge.
    Exploring the idea of knowledge as embodied, engendered and embedded in place and space, gender and sexuality are re-examined through the methodological and conceptual lenses of cartography, fieldwork, resistance, transgression and the divisions between local/global and public/private space. BodySpace brings together some of the best known geographers writing on gender and sexuality today to explore the role of space and place in the performance of gender and sexuality. The book takes a broad perspective on feminism as a theoretical critique, and (...)
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  28. Russell Eisenman (2008). Ovulation, Female Sexuality, and the Unconscious: An Evolutionary Psychology View. Journal of Information Ethics 17 (1):5-7.
  29. Patricia Elliot (1995). Politics, Identity, and Social Change: Contested Grounds in Psychoanalytic Feminism. Hypatia 10 (2):41 - 55.
    This essay engages in a debate with Nancy Fraser and Dorothy Leland concerning the contribution of Lacanian-inspired psychoanalytic feminism to feminist theory and practice. Teresa Brennan's analysis of the impasse in psychoanalysis and feminism and Judith Butler's proposal for a radically democratic feminism are employed in examining the issues at stake. I argue, with Brennan, that the impasse confronting psychoanalysis and feminism is the result of different conceptions of the relationship between the psychical and the social. I suggest Lacanian-inspired feminist (...)
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  30. Evangelia (2007). Sexual Objectification: From Kant to Contemporary Feminism. Contemporary Political Theory 6 (3):330.
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  31. Ann Ferguson (1989). Blood at the Root: Motherhood, Sexuality and Male Dominance. Pandora/Unwin & Hyman.
    This is a book on feminist theory from a socialist-feminist (materialist feminist) perspective. I categorize existing paradigms of Western feminist theory in the 1980s and contrast them with my own view, which adds to a critique of capitalism inspired by Marxism another system in which male domination persists, which I call the system of "sex-affective production" (inspired but going beyond Freud, Foucault and Deleuze and Guattari). I also discuss motherhood and sexuality using my paradigm personally, politically and philosophically.
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  32. Ann Ferguson (1986). Motherhood and Sexuality: Some Feminist Questions. Hypatia 1 (2):3 - 22.
    This is a review essay that also serves as an introduction to the other essays in the issue. It discusses feminist theory's relation to Freud, feminist ethical questions on motherhood and sexuality, the historical question of how systems of socially constructed sexual desire connect to male dominance, the question of the role of the body in feminist theory, and disputes within feminism on self, gender, agency and power.
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  33. Miranda Fricker (2000). Sex and Social Justice. Journal of Philosophy 97 (8):471-475.
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  34. Jane Gaines (1995). Feminist Heterosexuality and Its Politically Incorrect Pleasures. Critical Inquiry 21 (2):382.
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  35. Ann Garry (1998). Sex From Somewhere Liberally Different? Philosophical Studies 89 (2-3):375-385.
  36. Ann Garry (1980). Why Are Love and Sex Philosophically Interesting? Metaphilosophy 11 (2):165–177.
  37. Moira Gatens (1996). Sex, Gender, Sexuality. Southern Journal of Philosophy 35 (Supplement):1-19.
  38. Adèle Olivia Gladwell (1995). Catamania: The Dissonance of Female Pleasure and Dissent. Distributors to the Us Book Trade, Subterranean Company.
  39. Patricia Adair Gowaty (1992). Evolutionary Biology and Feminism. Human Nature 3 (3):217-249.
    Evolutionary biology and feminism share a variety of philosophical and practical concerns. I have tried to describe how a perspective from both evolutionary biology and feminism can accelerate the achievement of goals for both feminists and evolutionary biologists. In an early section of this paper I discuss the importance of variation to the disciplines of evolutionary biology and feminism. In the section entitled “Control of Female Reproduction” I demonstrate how insight provided by participation in life as woman and also as (...)
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  40. Heidi E. Grasswick (2004). Book Review: Anne Fausto-Sterling. The Science and Social World of Sex and Sexuality: A Review of Sexing the Body: Gender Politics and the Construction of Sexuality New York: Basic Books, 2000; and Edward Stein. The Mismeasure of Desire: The Science, Theory, and Ethics of Sexual Orientation. [REVIEW] Hypatia 19 (3):203-208.
  41. Emily Grosholz (2007). Black Sexual Politics: African Americans, Gender, and the New Racism by Patricia Hill Collins. Hypatia 22 (4):209-212.
  42. Emily Grosholz (2007). Black Sexual Politics: African Americans, Gender, and the New Racism (Review). Hypatia 22 (4):209-212.
  43. E. A. Grosz (2005). Time Travels: Feminism, Nature, Power. Duke University Press.
    Darwin and feminism: preliminary investigations into a possible alliance -- Darwin and the ontology of life -- The Nature of culture -- Law, justice, and the future -- The Time of violence: Derrida, deconstruction, and value -- Drucilla Cornell, identity, and the "Evolution" of Politics -- Philosophy, knowledge, and the future -- Deleuze, Bergson, and the virtual -- Merleau-Ponty, Bergson, and the question of ontology -- The thing -- Prosthetic objects -- Identity, sexual difference, and the future -- The Time (...)
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  44. Lori Gruen (2011). Sexual Expressions—Editor's Introduction. Hypatia 26 (1):127-130.
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  45. Corie Hammers & I. I. I. Brown (2004). Towards a Feminist-Queer Alliance: A Paradigmatic Shift in the Research Process. Social Epistemology 18 (1):85 – 101.
    Building on the advances made by feminist reconsiderations of methods, methodology and epistemology, this paper calls for an alliance between feminist social science and the emerging field of queer theory. By challenging traditional scientific approaches to research on sexual minority groups, a distinctly 'queer' approach is advocated that adopts a reflexive position on subjectivity and sexuality. While essentialist approaches privilege gay/lesbian, man/woman, and object/subject, this approach advances a framework of critical sexualities that moves social science into an arena of inclusivity (...)
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  46. Eleanor Heartney (2003). Thinking Through the Body: Women Artists and the Catholic Imagination. Hypatia 18 (4):3-22.
    : Mariology—the veneration of the Virgin Mary—exerts a profound influence on women artists from Catholic backgrounds. Internalizing the mixed signals Mary transmits about purity, female strength, and compassion, they reinterpret the stories and mythologies surrounding her in ways that allow them to explore the ambiguities of the female role in contemporary society while also examining their conflicts about their own sexuality.
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  47. Lisa Heldke (2006). “Dear Kate Bornstein”. Radical Philosophy Today 3:101-109.
    In an imagined letter to the author of My Gender Workbook, the author of this article recounts classroom discussions about gender identity that led to profound questions regarding the relation between sex, gender, and sexuality. The author argues that more conversation between bisexual and transgender perspectives would continue to unsettle conceptual frameworks for sexuality in helpful ways. The author finds special consequences in this conversation for the concept of gender, especially when it is considered as a reference point for self-exploration (...)
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  48. Lisa Heldke (1997). In Praise of Unreliability. Hypatia 12 (3):174 - 182.
    Bisexuality challenges familiar assumptions about love, family, and sexual desire that are shared by both heterosexual and homosexual communities. In particular, it challenges the assumption that a person's desire can and should run in only one direction. Furthermore, bisexuality questions the legitimacy, rigidity, and presumed ontological priority of the categories "heterosexual" and "homosexual." Bisexuals are often assumed to be dishonest and unreliable. I suggest that dishonesty and unreliability can be resources for undermining normative sexualities.
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  49. Peter Higgins (2005). Sexual Disorientation: Moral Implications of Gender Norms. In Lisa Gurley, Claudia Leeb & Anna Aloisia Moser (eds.), Feminists Contest Politics and Philosophy. PIE - Peter Lang.
    This paper argues that participating exclusively or predominantly in heterosexual romantic or sexual relationships is prima facie morally impermissible. It holds that this conclusion follows from three premises: (1) gender norms are on-balance harmful; (2) conforming to harmful social norms is prima facie morally impermissible; and (3) participating exclusively or predominantly in heterosexual romantic or sexual relationships is a way of conforming to gender norms.
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  50. Nancy J. Hirschmann (2013). Queer/Fear: Disability, Sexuality, and The Other. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 34 (2):139-147.
    This paper examines the relationship between disability and “queerness.” I argue that the hostility frequently expressed against both disabled and queer individuals is a function of fear of the undecidability of the body. I draw on feminist, queer, and disability theory to help us understand this phenomenon and suggest that these different kinds of theories have a complementary relationship. That is, feminist and queer theory help us see how this fear works, disability theory helps us see why it exists.
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