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  1. Christa Davis Acampora (2003). Body Talk: Philosophical Reflections on Sex and Gender (Review). Hypatia 18 (3):212-215.
  2. Ben Almassi (2010). Disability, Functional Diversity, and Trans/Feminism. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 3 (2):126-149.
    Feminist approaches to bioethics have the striking ability to usefully disrupt conversations otherwise in danger of calcifying into immovable opposing camps. Take, for instance, debates between theorists in disability studies and bioethicists who often take two different approaches to understanding disability. On one side are those such as Buchanan, Brock, Daniels, and Wikler (2000) who seek to locate the apparent functional deficiency of disability in biologically abnormal bodies. Let us call this a normal functioning approach to understanding disability. On the (...)
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  3. Anna Antonopoulos (1991). Writing the Mystic Body: Sexuality and Textuality in the Écriture-Féminine of Saint Catherine of Genoa. Hypatia 6 (3):185 - 207.
    This paper looks to evolve a discourse about the body in medieval women's mystical experience via an understanding of the life and work of Saint Catherine of Genoa as écriture-féminine. Drawing upon Catherine's resolution of binarism through the articulation of sexuality and textuality, I argue that the female mystic's experience of the body as site of struggle helps move beyond analysis of a binary experience to a politics of speaking the body directly.
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  4. Ann Ardis (1992). Presence of Mind, Presence of Body: Embodying Positionality in the Classroom. Hypatia 7 (2):167 - 176.
    This essay focuses on how we embody the language we speak: how an audience "reads" the body of a speaker as it both constructs the positionality of that speaking subject and construes that subject's discursive authority. Building on the work of Linda Brodkey and Michelle Fine, I explore what is at stake when university students harass a faculty member by accusing that teacher of not embodying authority in the proper form (body).
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  5. John Armitage (2003). Militarized Bodies: An Introduction. Body and Society 9 (4):1-12.
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  6. David Edward Armstrong (2003). Intersex in Context: Cultural Common Sense, Medicine and Ethics. Dissertation, University of Southern California
    How should health care practitioners address human sexual ambiguity? ;The range of cultural response to intersex varies enormously. In India, hijras are a marginally accepted third sex who live in their own communities. Pokot intersexuals cannot raise families but may accrue great wealth. In early modern Europe intersexuals were required to adopt and live an consistent social gender. The Navaho nadle has been honoured as a "super person" whose experience of being both female and male confers special abilities. ;Since the (...)
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  7. Mercedes Arriaga Flórez (ed.) (2006). Sin Carne: Representaciones y Simulacros Del Cuerpo Femenino: Tecnología, Comunicación y Poder. Arcibel Editores.
  8. Kim Atkins (2011). You've Changed: Sex Reassignment and Personal Identity. Edited by Laurie J. Shrage. Hypatia 26 (4):877-881.
  9. Susan E. Babbitt (2013). Humanism and Embodiment: Remarks on Cause and Effect. Hypatia 28 (4):733-748.
    I understand humanism to be the meta-ethical view that there exist discoverable (nonmoral) truths about the human condition, that is, about what it means to be human. We might think that as long as I believe I am realizing my unique human potential, I cannot be reasonably contradicted. Yet when we consider systemic oppression, this is unlikely. Systemic oppression makes dehumanizing conditions and treatment seem reasonable. In this paper, I consider the nature of understanding—drawing in particular upon recent defenses of (...)
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  10. Karen Barad (2006). Posthumanist Performativity : Toward an Understanding of How Matter Comes to Matter. In Deborah Orr (ed.), Belief, Bodies, and Being: Feminist Reflections on Embodiment. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
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  11. Sandra Lee Bartky (1998). Skin Deep: Femininity as a Disciplinary Regime. In Bat-Ami Bar On & Ann Ferguson (eds.), Daring to Be Good: Essays in Feminist Ethico-Politics. Routledge
  12. Shannon Bell (1994). Reading, Writing, and Rewriting the Prostitute Body. Indiana University Press.
    "I found this a fascinating book: wide-ranging, readable." —Alison Jaggar Bell shows how the flesh-and-blood female body engaged in sexual interaction for payment has no inherent meaning and is signified differently in different cultures ...
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  13. Debra Bergoffen (2008). On Female Body Experience: Throwing Like a Girl and Other Essays (Review). Hypatia 23 (3):pp. 217-220.
  14. Debra Bergoffen (2008). On Female Body Experience: Throwing Like a Girl and Other Essaysby Iris Marion Young. Hypatia 23 (3):217-220.
  15. Debra Bergoffen (2003). February 22, 2001: Toward a Politics of the Vulnerable Body. Hypatia 18 (1):116-134.
  16. Debra Bergoffen & Gail Weiss (2012). Cluster: Contesting the Norms of Embodiment — Editors' Introduction. Hypatia 27 (2):241-242.
  17. Debra Bergoffen & Gail Weiss (2011). Embodying the Ethical—Editors' Introduction. Hypatia 26 (3):453-460.
  18. Talia Mae Bettcher (2012). Full-Frontal Morality: The Naked Truth About Gender. Hypatia 27 (2):319-337.
    This paper examines Harold Garfinkel's notion of the natural attitude about sex and his claim that it is fundamentally moral in nature. The author looks beneath the natural attitude in order to explain its peculiar resilience and oppressive force. There she reveals a moral order grounded in the dichotomously sexed bodies so constituted through boundaries governing privacy and decency. In particular, naked bodies are sex-differentiated within a system of genital representation through gender presentation—a system that helps constitute the very boundaries (...)
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  19. Talia Mae Bettcher (2007). Evil Deceivers and Make-Believers: On Transphobic Violence and the Politics of Illusion. Hypatia 22 (3):43-65.
  20. Rosemary Betterton (2006). Promising Monsters: Pregnant Bodies, Artistic Subjectivity, and Maternal Imagination. Hypatia 21 (1):80-100.
    : This paper engages with theories of the monstrous maternal in feminist philosophy to explore how examples of visual art practice by Susan Hiller, Marc Quinn, Alison Lapper, Tracey Emin, and Cindy Sherman disrupt maternal ideals in visual culture through differently imagined body schema. By examining instances of the pregnant body represented in relation to maternal subjectivity, disability, abortion, and "prosthetic" pregnancy, it asks whether the "monstrous" can offer different kinds of figurations of the maternal that acknowledge the agency and (...)
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  21. Rosemary Betterton (2006). Promising Monsters: Pregnant Bodies, Artistic Subjectivity, and Maternal Imagination. Hypatia 21 (1):80-100.
  22. Carol Bigwood (1991). Renaturalizing the Body. Hypatia 6 (3):54-73.
  23. Lynda I. A. Birke (2000). Feminism and the Biological Body. Rutgers University Press.
  24. Emma Borg (forthcoming). The Body Politics of Julia Kristeva. Hypatia.
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  25. Rosi Braidotti (2011). Nomadic Subjects: Embodiment and Sexual Difference in Contemporary Feminist Theory. Columbia University Press.
    Introduction -- By way of nomadism -- Context and generations -- Sexual difference theory -- On the female feminist subject : from "she-self" to "she-other" -- Sexual difference as a nomadic political project -- Organs without bodies -- Images without imagination -- Mothers, monsters, and machines -- Discontinuous becomings : Deleuze and the becoming-woman of philosophy -- Envy and ingratitude: men in feminism -- Conclusion. Geometries of passion : a conversation.
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  26. Rosi Braidotti (2002). Metamorphoses: Towards a Materialist Theory of Becoming. Published by Polity Press in Association with Blackwell Publishers.
  27. Elizabeth Brake (2006). Review of Rebecca Kukla, Mass Hysteria: Medicine, Culture, and Mothers' Bodies. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (12).
    of Rebecca Kukla , , from Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
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  28. Sarah-Vaughn Brakman & Sally J. Scholz (2006). Adoption, ART, and a Re-Conception of the Maternal Body: Toward Embodied Maternity. Hypatia 21 (1):54-73.
    : We criticize a view of maternity that equates the natural with the genetic and biological and show how such a practice overdetermines the maternal body and the maternal experience for women who are mothers through adoption and ART (Assisted Reproductive Technologies). As an alternative, we propose a new framework designed to rethink maternal bodies through the lens of feminist embodiment. Feminist embodied maternity, as we call it, stresses the particularity of experience through subjective embodiment. A feminist embodied maternity emphasizes (...)
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  29. Shoshana Brassfield (2012). Overcoming Objectification: A Carnal Ethics. [REVIEW] Teaching Philosophy 35 (2):217-221.
    The central argument of Ann Cahill’s Overcoming Objectification is that the concept of sexual objectification should be replaced by Cahill’s concept of derivatization in order to better capture the wrongness of degrading images and practices without depending on an objectionably narrow and disembodied conception of self. To derivatize someone is not to treat her as a non-person, but rather to treat her as a derivative person, reducing her to an aspect of another’s being. Although not perfect, Cahill’s approach advances the (...)
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  30. Jana Braziel (2006). Being and Time, Non-Being and Space : Introductory Notes Toward an Ontological Study of 'Woman' and Chora'. In Deborah Orr (ed.), Belief, Bodies, and Being: Feminist Reflections on Embodiment. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
  31. Susan J. Brison (2006). Contentious Freedom: Sex Work and Social Construction. Hypatia 21 (4):192-200.
  32. Barbara Brook, Gail Weiss, Honi Fern Haber, Jane Arthurs & Jean Grimshaw (2004). Feminist Perspectives on the Body. Hypatia 19 (2):160-169.
  33. Kristen Brown (1999). Possible and Questionable: Opening Nietzsche's Genealogy to Feminine Body. Hypatia 14 (3):39-58.
    : According to Kelly Oliver and Elizabeth Grosz, while Friedrich Nietzsche begins to open Western philosophy to the other, the body, he cuts off feminine body. Here I create a framework through which the possibility and questionability of a symbolically feminine body begins to emerge. I do this by using the metaphor of Indian curry. The metaphor works on two levels: 1) as a symbolically feminine body; 2) as Nietzsche's conception of subject-formation as a dynamic monism.
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  34. Cynthia B. Bryson (1998). Mary Astell: Defender of the “Disembodied Mind”. Hypatia 13 (4):40-62.
  35. Eloise A. Buker (1991). The Female Body and the Law. By ZILLAH R. EISENSTEIN. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1988. Hypatia 6 (3):221-226.
  36. Louise Burchill (2006). Re-Situating the Feminine in Contemporary French Philosophy. In Deborah Orr (ed.), Belief, Bodies, and Being: Feminist Reflections on Embodiment. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
  37. Rachel Burgess (2005). Feminine Stubble. Hypatia 20 (3):230-237.
  38. Rachel Burgess (2005). Feminine Stubble. Hypatia 20 (3):230-237.
  39. Nadya Burton (1998). Resistance to Prevention: Reconsidering Feminist Antiviolence Rhetoric. In Stanley French, Wanda Teays & Laura Purdy (eds.), Violence Against Women: Philosophical Perspectives. Cornell University Press 182--200.
  40. Ann J. Cahill (2011). Overcoming Objectification. Routledge.
    Objectification is a foundational concept in feminist theory, used to analyze such disparate social phenomena as sex work, representation of women's bodies, and sexual harassment. However, there has been an increasing trend among scholars of rejecting and re-evaluating the philosophical assumptions which underpin it. In this work, Cahill suggests an abandonment of the notion of objectification, on the basis of its dependence on a Kantian ideal of personhood. Such an ideal fails to recognize sufficiently the role the body plays in (...)
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  41. Ann J. Cahill (2010). Getting to My Fighting Weight. Hypatia 25 (2):485 - 492.
  42. Ann J. Cahill (2003). Feminist Pleasure and Feminine Beautification. Hypatia 18 (4):42-64.
  43. Joan Callahan, Laura Purdy & Kathy Rudy (1997). Reproduction, Ethics, and the Law. Hypatia 12 (4):202-211.
  44. V. J. Callan (1986). Single Women, Voluntary Childlessness and Perceptions About Life and Marriage. Journal of Biosocial Science 18 (4):479-487.
  45. Paula Cameron (2012). Curriculum Vitae : Embodied Ethics at the Seams of Intelligibility. Hypatia 27 (2):423-439.
    Sites of embodied disruption challenge academics to engage with power at its seams. In this article I consider an ethics of embodiment, situating it within questions raised by Judith Butler in her articles, “Doing Justice to Someone” and “Giving an Account of Oneself”. In “Giving an Account,” Butler claims that gaps in knowledge and representation are germane to ethical practice, that brave inadequacies and creative approximations are the best we can do for others and ourselves. In “Doing Justice,” Butler enacts (...)
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  46. Sue Campbell, Letitia Meynell & Susan Sherwin (eds.) (2009). Embodiment and Agency. Pennsylvania State University Press.
  47. Shirley Castelnuovo (1998). Feminism and the Female Body: Liberating the Amazon Within. L. Rienner Publishers.
  48. Adriana Cavarero (2002). Stately Bodies: Literature, Philosophy, and the Question of Gender. University of Michigan Press.
    The book builds on work from Adriana Cavarero's well-received study, In Spite of Plato: A Feminist Rewriting of Ancient Philosophy.
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  49. Samuel Allen Chambers (2008). Judith Butler and Political Theory: Troubling Politics. Routledge.
  50. Claire Colebrook (2000). From Radical Representations to Corporeal Becomings: The Feminist Philosophy of Lloyd, Grosz, and Gatens. Hypatia 15 (2):76-93.
    : Contrasting the work of Genevieve Lloyd, Elizabeth Grosz, and Moira Gatens with the poststructuralist philosophy of Judith Butler, this paper identifies a distinctive "Australian" feminism. It argues that while Butler remains trapped by the matter/representation binary, the Spinozist turn in Lloyd and Gatens, and Grosz's work on Bergson and Deleuze, are attempts to think corporeality.
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1 — 50 / 142