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  1. David M. Adams (2002). Families: Law, Gender and Difference. Hypatia 17 (3):254-256.
  2. Richard J. Arneson (1997). Feminism and Family Justice. Public Affairs Quarterly 11 (4):313-330.
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  3. Amy R. Baehr (1996). Toward a New Feminist Liberalism: Okin, Rawls, and Habermas. Hypatia 11 (1):49 - 66.
    While Okin's feminist appropriation of Rawls's theory of justice requires that principles of justice be applied directly to the family, Rawls seems to require only that the family be minimally just. Rawls's recent proposal dulls the critical edge of liberalism by capitulating too much to those holding sexist doctrines. Okin's proposal, however, is insufficiently flexible. An alternative account of the relation of the political and the nonpolitical is offered by Jürgen Habermas.
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  4. Saba Bahar (1996). Human Rights Are Women's Right: Amnesty International and the Family. Hypatia 11 (1):105 - 134.
    This essay examines why the recent recognition of human rights violations against women, as exemplified by Amnesty International's 1995 report on women, remains bound to the limitations of traditional approaches to human rights. The essay argues that despite Amnesty International's commitment to incorporating violations against women into its activities, it nevertheless upholds questionable assumptions about the gendered subject, gender relations within the family, and the relationship between the family and the state.
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  5. Isaac D. Balbus (2002). Book Review: Uma Narayan and Julia J. Bartkowiak. Having and Raising Children: Unconventional Families, Hard Choices, Social Good. University Park, Pa.: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1999. [REVIEW] Hypatia 17 (2):162-165.
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  6. Kelly H. Ball (2009). Producing Populations: Biopolitics, The Family, and Experiences of Queer Foster Youth. Journal of Family Life.
  7. Debra Bergoffen (2005). Book Review: Kelly Oliver. The Subject of Love: A Review of Family Values: Subjects Between Nature and Culture (New York: Routledge, 1997); and Witnessing: Beyond Recognition (Minneapolis, University of Minnesota Press, 2001). [REVIEW] Hypatia 20 (2):202-207.
  8. Elisabeth Boetzkes (2001). Privacy, Property, and the Family in the Age of Genetic Testing: Observations From Transformative Feminism. Journal of Social Philosophy 32 (3):301–316.
  9. Susan Bordo (2005). Musings: Adoption. Hypatia 20 (1):230-236.
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  10. Susan Bordo (2005). Adoption. Hypatia 20 (1):230 - 236.
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  11. Marilea Bramer (2011). Domestic Violence as a Violation of Autonomy and Agency. Social Philosophy Today 27:97-110.
    Contrary to what we might initially think, domestic violence is not simply a violation of respect. This characterization of domestic violence misses two key points. First, the issue of respect in connection with domestic violence is not as straightforward as it appears. Second, domestic violence is also a violation of care. These key points explain how domestic violence negatively affects a victim’s autonomy and agency—the ability to choose and pursue her own goals and life plan.We have a moral responsibility to (...)
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  12. Corey Brettschneider (2007). The Politics of the Personal: A Liberal Approach. American Political Science Review 101 (1):19-31.
    Feminist thinkers have long criticized liberal theory’s public/private distinction for perpetuating indifference to injustices within the family. Thinkers such as Susan Okin have extended this criticism in evaluating the theory of political liberalism, suggesting that this theory’s reliance on a public conception of citizenship renders it indifferent to the way in which the internal politics of the family can undermine equality.However, I argue in this article that the feminist concern to ensure equality within the domestic sphere can in fact be (...)
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  13. Cheshire Calhoun (2002). Feminism, the Family, and the Politics of the Closet: Lesbian and Gay Displacement. OUP Oxford.
    Feminism, the Family, and the Politics of the Closet is about placing sexual orientation politics within feminist theorizing. It is also about defining the central political issues confronting lesbians and gay men. The book brings the study of lesbians from the margins of feminist theory to the center by critiquing the analytic frameworks employed within feminist theory that renders invisible lesbians' difference from heterosexual women. This book also outlines the basic features of lesbian and gay subordination by exploring the differences (...)
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  14. Lisa Cassidy (2006). That Many of Us Should Not Parent. Hypatia 21 (4):40-57.
    : In liberal societies (where birth control is generally accepted and available), many people decide whether or not they wish to become parents. One key question in making this decision is, What kind of parent will I be? Parenting competence can be ranked from excellent to competent to poor. Cassidy argues that those who can foresee being poor parents, or even merely competent ones, should opt not to parent.
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  15. Patricia Hill Collins (1998). It's All in the Family: Intersections of Gender, Race, and Nation. Hypatia 13 (3):62 - 82.
    Intersectionality has attracted substantial scholarly attention in the 1990s. Rather than examining gender, race, class, and nation as distinctive social hierarchies, intersectionality examines how they mutually construct one another. I explore how the traditional family ideal functions as a privileged exemplar of intersectionality in the United States. Each of its six dimensions demonstrates specific connections between family as a gendered system of social organization, racial ideas and practices, and constructions of U.S. national identity.
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  16. Brittany Crockett (2009). A Study of Documentary Sources Relating to Women's Right to Divorce in Ancient Judea. Constellations 1 (1).
    This paper examines the concept and treatment of divorce in ancient Judea as a historical reality rather than a theological issue, focusing particularly on the idea of the wife as the active party in the divorce. Did women in Judea have the right to initiate divorce? It seems the answer might have been yes. The implications of several key documentary sources, including various marriage and legal contracts relating to divorce are discussed. The paper concludes with a brief look at several (...)
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  17. Stephen M. Crow & Dinah Payne (1992). Affirmative Action for a Face Only a Mother Could Love? Journal of Business Ethics 11 (11):869 - 875.
    Physical attractiveness is highly valued in our society and impacts a variety of decisions made by organizations. Generally speaking, research findings suggest that the more attractive the person, the greater the likelihood of favorable employment-related decisions. It follows then, that those considered physically unattractive will suffer adversely in some employment-related decisional contexts — decisions that may prevent them from achieving the good life. Until recently, discrimination against unattractive people has been considered nothing more than a moral or ethical issue. However, (...)
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  18. Ellen K. Feder (2007). Family Bonds: Genealogies of Race and Gender. OUP USA.
    Ellen Feder's monograph is an attempt to think about the categories of race and gender together. She explains and then employs some critical tools derived from Foucault (particularly his ideas about systems of knowledge and the power that governs them), in order to advance her main argument: that the institution of the family is the locus of the production of gender and race, and that gender is best understood as a function of a "disciplinary" power that operates within the family, (...)
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  19. Ann Ferguson (2007). Gay Marriage: An American and Feminist Dilemma. Hypatia 22 (1):39-57.
    : Gay marriage highlights a contradiction in American national identity: if gay marriage is supported, the normative status of the heterosexual nuclear family is undermined, while if not, the civil rights of homosexuals are undermined. This essay discusses the feminist dilemma of whether to support gay marriage to promote these individual civil rights or whether to critique marriage as a part of the patriarchal system that oppresses women.
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  20. Ann Ferguson (1991). Sexual Democracy: Women, Oppression and Revolution. Westview.
    This is a book in feminist theory and social and political philosophy. Many of the chapters are versions of earlier papers published as journal articles and as book chapters. It presents a multi-systems theory of social domination, discussing three main ones: economic class, gender and (social) race. It presents a maerialist feminist theory of gender and sexuality and discusses lesbian identity as well as issues of motherhood.
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  21. Rachel Fredericks (2013). Review of Christine Overall, Why Have Children? The Ethical Debate. [REVIEW] Hypatia Reviews Online.
  22. Kathleen Gerson (2011). The Unfinished Revolution: Coming of Age in a New Era of Gender, Work, and Family. OUP USA.
    In the controversial public debate over modern American families, the vast changes in family life--the rise of single, two-paycheck, and same-sex parents--have often been blamed for declining morality and unhappy children. Drawing upon pioneering research with the children of the gender revolution, Kathleen Gerson reveals that it is not a lack of "family values," but rigid social and economic forces that make it difficult to have a vibrant and committed family and work life. -/- Despite the entrance of women into (...)
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  23. Anca Gheaus (2013). Care Drain as an Issue of Global Gender Justice. Ethical Perspectives 20 (1).
  24. Valerie A. Hartouni (1986). Antigone's Dilemma: A Problem in Political Membership. Hypatia 1 (1):3 - 20.
    What constitutes an adequate basis for feminist consciousness? What values and concerns are feminists to bring to bear in challenging present standards of well-being and articulating alternative visions of collective life? This essay takes a close and critical look at these questions as they are addressed in the work of political theorist Jean Elshtain. An outspoken defender of "pro-family feminism," Elshtain has urged contemporary feminists to reclaim the "female subject" within the private sphere. Enormous problems attend Elshtain's counsel and these (...)
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  25. Eva Feder Kittay (2013). The Body as the Place of Care. In Donald A. Landes & Azucena Cruz-Pierre (eds.), Exploring the Work of Edward S. Casey. Bloomsbury Publishing,.
  26. Hallie Liberto (2013). Noxious Markets Versus Noxious Gift Relationships. Social Theory and Practice 39 (2):265-287.
    I argue that women in traditional marriages are a vulnerable source for kidneys and this vulnerability gives rise to exploitative donation arrangements made within families. In so doing, I critique Alan Wertheimer’s account of the impact that emotional closeness between participants in an agreement has on the wrongfulness of exploitation. I propose a regulated market scheme that is not only less exploitative than our current donation scheme, but also resolves a variety of other moral problems that typically arise in real (...)
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  27. Simon Cabulea May (2012). Liberal Feminism and the Ethics of Polygamy. In Daniela Cutas & Sarah Chan (eds.), Families - Beyond the Nuclear Ideal. Bloomsbury Academic.
    I distinguish two ways that a cultural practice may be inherently objectionable. I reject the claim that polygamy is inherently "vicious" because asymmetric marriages are inevitably inegalitarian. I argue that there is good reason to think polygamy is inherently "bankrupt" insofar as a cultural ideal of asymmetric marriage presupposes stereotypical gender roles.
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  28. Martha Minow & Mary Lyndon Shanley (1996). Relational Rights and Responsibilities: Revisioning the Family in Liberal Political Theory and Law. Hypatia 11 (1):4 - 29.
    This article discusses three main orientations in recent works of legal and political theory about the family-contract-based, community-based, and rights-based-and argues that none of these takes adequate account of two paradoxical features of family life and of the family's relationship to the state. A coherent political and legal theory of the family in the contemporary United States requires recognition of the relational rights and responsibilities intrinsic to family life.
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  29. Michele M. Moody-Adams (1996). Feminist Inquiry and the Transformation of the 'Public' Sphere in Virginia Held's "Feminist Morality". [REVIEW] Hypatia 11 (1):155 - 167.
    Virginia Held's Feminist Morality defends the idea that it is possible to transform the "public" sphere by remaking it on the model of existing "private" relationships such as families. This paper challenges Held's optimism. It is argued that feminist moral inquiry can aid in transforming the public sphere only by showing just how much the allegedly "private" realms of families and personal relationships are shaped-and often misshapen-by public demands and concerns.
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  30. Susan Moller Okin (1982). Women and the Making of the Sentimental Family. Philosophy and Public Affairs 11 (1):65-88.
  31. Kelly Oliver (1996). Antigone's Ghost: Undoing Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit. Hypatia 11 (1):67 - 90.
    This essay argues that Hegel's discussion of the family in "The Ethical Order" section of Phenomenology of Spirit undermines the entire project of that text. Hegel's project demands that every element of consciousness be conceptualizable, and yet, woman, an essential unconscious element of consciousness, is in principle unconceptualizable. The end of the essay attempts to relate Hegel's discussion of the family to contemporary discussions of family values.
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  32. Ann A. Pang-White (2013). Zhu Xi on Family and Women: Challenges and Potentials. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 40 (3-4):436-455.
    This article reappraises Zhu Xi's philosophy of women. First, it examines Zhu's descriptive texts. Second, it analyzes Zhu's didactic texts on li, qi, yin, yang, and gender. It finds that (i) surprisingly Zhu exhibited a level of flexibility toward women on subjects of education, property rights, and household management; (ii) his view on the male/yang and female/yin relationship was inconsistent; and (iii) improvement on Zhu's social-political teaching on women's role could result from a more consistent development of his metaphysics. When (...)
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  33. Shelley Park (2010). Cyborg Mothering. In Mothers Who Deliver: Feminist Interventions into Public and Interpersonal Discourse.
    As new communication technologies transform everyday life in the 21st century, personal, family, and other social relations are transformed with it. As a way of exploring the larger question, "how exactly does communication technology transform love and how love is lived?" here I explore the cell phone, instant messaging and other communication technologies as electronic extensions of maternal bodies connecting (cyber)mother to (cyber)children. -/- Feminist explorations of the marketing and use of cell phones, as well as other communication technologies, have (...)
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  34. Shelley M. Park (2013). Mothering Queerly, Queering Motherhood: Resisting Monomaternalism in Adoptive, Lesbian, Blended and Polygamous Families. SUNY.
    Bridging the gap between feminist studies of motherhood and queer theory, Mothering Queerly, Queering Motherhood articulates a provocative philosophy of queer kinship that need not be rooted in lesbian or gay sexual identities. Working from an interdisciplinary framework that incorporates feminist philosophy and queer, psychoanalytic, poststructuralist, and postcolonial theories, Shelley M. Park offers a powerful critique of an ideology she terms monomaternalism. Despite widespread cultural insistence that every child should have one—and only one—“real” mother, many contemporary family constellations do not (...)
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  35. Shelley M. Park (2009). Is Queer Parenting Possible? In Who’s Your Daddy? And Other Writings on Queer Parenting. Toronto: Sumach Press.
    This paper examines the possibility of parenting as a queer practice. Examining definitions of “queer” as resistant to presumptions and practices of reprosexuality and repro-narrativity (Michael Warner), bourgeouis norms of domestic space and family time (Judith Halberstam), and policies of reproductive futurism (Lee Edelman), I argue that queer parenting is possible. Indeed, parenting that resists practices of normalization are, in part, realized by certain types of postmodern families. However, fully actualizing the possibility of parenting queerly—and thus teaching our children the (...)
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  36. Shelley M. Park (2005). Real (M)Othering: The Metaphysics of Maternity in Children's Literature. In Real (M)othering: The Metaphysics of Maternity in Children's Literature. In Sally Haslanger and Charlotte Witt, eds. Adoption Matters: Philosophical and Feminist Essays. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press. 171-194.
    This paper examines the complexity and fluidity of maternal identity through an examination of narratives about "real motherhood" found in children's literature. Focusing on the multiplicity of mothers in adoption, I question standard views of maternity in which gestational, genetic and social mothering all coincide in a single person. The shortcomings of traditional notions of motherhood are overcome by developing a fluid and inclusive conception of maternal reality as authored by a child's own perceptions.
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  37. Elsie Clews Parsons (1917). Feminism and the Family. International Journal of Ethics 28 (1):52-58.
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  38. Linda Radzik (2005). Justice in the Family: A Defence of Feminist Contractarianism. Journal of Applied Philosophy 22 (1):45–54.
    Jean Hampton argues that we can detect exploitation in personal relationships by thinking about what we would agree to were we to set aside the emotional benefits we receive from those relationships. Hampton calls her account "feminist contractarianism," but it has recently been critiqued as decidedly unfeminist, on the grounds that it is hostile to women's interests and women's values. Furthermore, Hampton's requirement that we imaginatively distance ourselves from our emotional connections to our loved ones--the key element in her contractarian (...)
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  39. Sheryl Tuttle Ross (2009). Raising Responsibility: Motherhood and Moral Luck. Hypatia 24 (1):56-69.
    This paper extends Claudia Card's account of agency in the face of moral luck in order to theoretically ground the activities of feminist mothers who endeavor to raise responsible human beings. The paper addresses those who mother in gray areas—areas where mothers are victims of the evils of the institution of motherhood while having authority and influence over their children. -/- .
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  40. J. S. Russell (1995). Okin's Rawlsian Feminism?: Justice in the Family and Another Liberalism. Social Theory and Practice 21 (3):397-426.
  41. Debra Satz, Feminist Perspectives on Reproduction and the Family. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  42. James P. Sterba (2005). Review of Amy Mullin, Reconceiving Pregnancy and Childcare: Ethics, Experience, and Reproductive Labor. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (10).
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  43. Karen Struening (1996). Feminist Challenges to the New Familialism: Lifestyle Experimentation and the Freedom of Intimate Association. Hypatia 11 (1):135 - 154.
    The new familialists argue that the decline of the intact two-parent family is responsible for our most pressing social problems and advocate public policies designed to promote family stability and discourage divorce and nonmarital births. This essay defends the freedom of intimate association and argue that family stability, while an important good, must be balanced with other goods such as equality and justice within the family, happiness, and individual self-development.
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  44. Erin C. Tarver (2013). Work/Life Integration. In Christopher Luetege (ed.), Handbook of the Philosophical Foundations of Business Ethics. Springer. 1191--1202.
    Some provisions of the UN’s Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) are clearly important from the perspective of business ethics, particularly those calling for equal rights for women to employment and financial security. Some other provisions of CEDAW are equally as important for ethical business practices and Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), but are frequently overlooked because of the presumption that they are not strictly business concerns: the rights of women to participation in public life, marriage, and family (...)
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  45. Chloë Taylor (2012). Foucault and Familial Power. Hypatia 27 (1):201-218.
    This paper provides an overview of Michel Foucault's continually changing observations on familial power, as well as the feminist-Foucauldian literature on the family. It suggests that these accounts offer fragments of a genealogy of the family that undermine any all-encompassing or transhistorical account of the institution. Approaching the family genealogically, rather than seeking a single model of power that can explain it, shows that far from this institution being a quasi-natural formation or a bedrock of unassailable values, it is in (...)
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  46. Shelley Tremain (2013). Review of Christine Overall`s Why Have Children? The Ethical Debate. [REVIEW] Apa Newsletter on Feminism and Philosophy 12 (2).
  47. Lori Watson (2003). Cheshire Calhoun, Feminism, the Family, and the Politics of the Closet: Lesbian and Gay Displacement:Feminism, the Family, and the Politics of the Closet: Lesbian and Gay Displacement. Ethics 113 (2):396-400.
  48. Cynthia Willett (2008). Family Matters: Feminist Concepts in African Philosophy of Cultureby Nkiru Uwechia Nzegwu. Hypatia 23 (3):224-226.
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  49. Iris Marion Young (1995). Mothers, Citizenship, and Independence: A Critique of Pure Family Values. Ethics 105 (3):535-556.