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  1. Rebecca Aanerud (2007). The Legacy of White Supremacy and the Challenge of White Antiracist Mothering. Hypatia 22 (2):20-38.
  2. David M. Adams (2002). Families: Law, Gender and Difference. Hypatia 17 (3):254-256.
  3. Elizabeth Anderson (2004). Uses of Value Judgments in Feminist Social Science: A Case Study of Research on Divorce. Hypatia 19 (1):1-24.
  4. Richard J. Arneson (1997). Feminism and Family Justice. Public Affairs Quarterly 11 (4):313-330.
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  5. Amy R. Baehr (1996). Toward a New Feminist Liberalism: Okin, Rawls, and Habermas. Hypatia 11 (1):49 - 66.
    While Okin's feminist appropriation of Rawls's theory of justice requires that principles of justice be applied directly to the family, Rawls seems to require only that the family be minimally just. Rawls's recent proposal dulls the critical edge of liberalism by capitulating too much to those holding sexist doctrines. Okin's proposal, however, is insufficiently flexible. An alternative account of the relation of the political and the nonpolitical is offered by Jürgen Habermas.
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  6. Saba Bahar (1996). Human Rights Are Women's Right: Amnesty International and the Family. Hypatia 11 (1):105 - 134.
    This essay examines why the recent recognition of human rights violations against women, as exemplified by Amnesty International's 1995 report on women, remains bound to the limitations of traditional approaches to human rights. The essay argues that despite Amnesty International's commitment to incorporating violations against women into its activities, it nevertheless upholds questionable assumptions about the gendered subject, gender relations within the family, and the relationship between the family and the state.
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  7. Isaac D. Balbus (2002). Book Review: Uma Narayan and Julia J. Bartkowiak. Having and Raising Children: Unconventional Families, Hard Choices, Social Good. University Park, Pa.: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1999. [REVIEW] Hypatia 17 (2):162-165.
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  8. Kelly H. Ball (2009). Producing Populations: Biopolitics, The Family, and Experiences of Queer Foster Youth. Journal of Family Life.
  9. Sandrine Berges (2015). Is Motherhood Compatible with Political Participation? Sophie de Grouchy’s Care-Based Republicanism. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 18 (1):47-60.
    Motherhood, as it is practiced, constitutes an obstacle to gender equality in political participation. Several options are available as a potential solution to this problem. One is to advice women not to become mothers, or if they do, to devote less time and energy to caring for their children. However this will have negative repercussions for those who need to be cared for, whether children, sick people or the elderly. A second solution is to reject the view that political participation (...)
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  10. Sandrine Bergès (2015). Is Not Doing the Washing Up Like Draft Dodging? The Military Model for Resisting a Gender Based Labour Division. Journal of Applied Philosophy 33 (2):n/a-n/a.
    I will examine a version of Bubeck's and Robeyns' proposals for ‘care duty’ which looks at the ways in which care work is analogous to defence work, and what the implications are for the best models in terms both of distributive justice and serving the common good. My own analysis will differ from Bubeck's and Robeyns' in two respects. First I will apply their arguments to all aspects of care including housework. This will mean making a case for housework counting (...)
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  11. Debra Bergoffen (2005). Book Review: Kelly Oliver. The Subject of Love: A Review of Family Values: Subjects Between Nature and Culture (New York: Routledge, 1997); and Witnessing: Beyond Recognition (Minneapolis, University of Minnesota Press, 2001). [REVIEW] Hypatia 20 (2):202-207.
  12. Swasti Bhattacharyya (2002). Infertility and Assisted Reproductive Technology in a Pluralistic World: A Development and Application of a Hindu Ethic. Dissertation, University of Southern California
    Reproductive technology is in the forefront of medical research and contemporary bioethical debates. In the United States, ethical issues involved are often framed by conflicts among legal, scientific, and religious perspectives. The primary religious voices influencing these North American discussions are those grounded in various Jewish and Christian traditions. However, this country is known for its religious and cultural diversity. This diversity of worldviews presents challenges that the field of bioethics needs to address. My goal is to inform and contribute (...)
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  13. Gisela Bock & Pat Thane (1991). Maternity and Gender Policies Women and the Rise of the European Welfare States, 1880-1950s.
  14. Elisabeth Boetzkes (2001). Privacy, Property, and the Family in the Age of Genetic Testing: Observations From Transformative Feminism. Journal of Social Philosophy 32 (3):301–316.
  15. Susan Bordo (2005). Musings: Adoption. Hypatia 20 (1):230-236.
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  16. Susan Bordo (2005). Adoption. Hypatia 20 (1):230 - 236.
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  17. Anne Bottomley & Simone Wong (2006). Special Issue: Domestic Partnerships: Stretching the Marriage Model? [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 14 (2):141-143.
  18. Elizabeth Brake (ed.) (2016). After Marriage: Rethinking Marital Relationships. Oxford University Press Usa.
    In this collection, liberal and feminist philosophers debate whether marriage reform ought to stop with same-sex marriage. Some authors argue for abolishing marriage or for new legal forms such as polygamy or temporary marriage. Others argue that the liberal values justifying same-sex marriage do not entail further reform.
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  19. Marilea Bramer (2011). Domestic Violence as a Violation of Autonomy and Agency. Social Philosophy Today 27:97-110.
    Contrary to what we might initially think, domestic violence is not simply a violation of respect. This characterization of domestic violence misses two key points. First, the issue of respect in connection with domestic violence is not as straightforward as it appears. Second, domestic violence is also a violation of care. These key points explain how domestic violence negatively affects a victim’s autonomy and agency—the ability to choose and pursue her own goals and life plan.We have a moral responsibility to (...)
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  20. Corey Brettschneider (2007). The Politics of the Personal: A Liberal Approach. American Political Science Review 101 (1):19-31.
    Feminist thinkers have long criticized liberal theory’s public/private distinction for perpetuating indifference to injustices within the family. Thinkers such as Susan Okin have extended this criticism in evaluating the theory of political liberalism, suggesting that this theory’s reliance on a public conception of citizenship renders it indifferent to the way in which the internal politics of the family can undermine equality.However, I argue in this article that the feminist concern to ensure equality within the domestic sphere can in fact be (...)
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  21. Robert L. Burgess (1994). The Family in a Changing World. Human Nature 5 (2):203-221.
    Increasing numbers of young mothers in the work force, more and more children requiring extrafamilial care, high rates of divorce, lower rates of remarriage, increasing numbers of female-headed households, growing numbers of zero-parent families, and significant occurrences of child maltreatment are just some of the social indicators indicative of the family in a changing world. These trends and their consequences for children are described and then examined from the perspectives of microeconomic theory, the relative-income hypothesis, sex-ratio theory, and one form (...)
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  22. Leonie Caldecott (1992). Brave New Family: G. K. Chesterton on Men and Women, Children, Sex, Divorce, Marriage and the Family," Ed. Alvaro de Silva". [REVIEW] The Chesterton Review 18 (1):98-104.
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  23. Cheshire Calhoun (2002). Feminism, the Family, and the Politics of the Closet: Lesbian and Gay Displacement. OUP Oxford.
    How has feminism failed lesbianism? What issues belong at the top of a lesbian and gay political agenda? This book answers both questions by examining what lesbian and gay subordination really amounts to. Calhoun argues that lesbians and gays aren't just socially and politically disadvantaged. The closet displaces lesbians and gays from visible citizenship, and both law and cultural norms deny lesbians and gay men a private sphere of romance, marriage, and the family.
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  24. Joan Callahan, Laura Purdy & Kathy Rudy (1997). Reproduction, Ethics, and the Law. Hypatia 12 (4):202-211.
  25. V. J. Callan (1986). Single Women, Voluntary Childlessness and Perceptions About Life and Marriage. Journal of Biosocial Science 18 (4):479-487.
  26. Loren Cannon (2016). Firestonian Futures and Trans‐Affirming Presents. Hypatia 31 (2):229-244.
    Shulamith Firestone's Dialectic of Sex: The Case for Feminist Revolution was, upon its original publication, both radicacmen would be freed from the burden of childbirth, in which the nuclear family, gender roles, typical constructions of marriage and parenting are all a thing of the past, still for many seems radical, even forty-five years after its debut in 1970. With Firestone's recent passing, it is a particularly suitable time to reconsider her work in light of the medical, technological, and social changes (...)
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  27. M. Carballo (1977). WHO Collaborative Studies on Breastfeeding. Journal of Biosocial Science 9 (S4):83-89.
  28. Claudia Card (2007). Gay Divorce: Thoughts on the Legal Regulation of Marriage. Hypatia 22 (1):24-38.
  29. Åsa Carlson (2007). Book Review: Sally Haslanger Och Charlotte Witt (Eds.) Adoption Matters, Philosophical and Feminist Essays. [REVIEW] Theoria 73 (4):354-358.
  30. Lisa Cassidy (2006). That Many of Us Should Not Parent. Hypatia 21 (4):40-57.
    : In liberal societies (where birth control is generally accepted and available), many people decide whether or not they wish to become parents. One key question in making this decision is, What kind of parent will I be? Parenting competence can be ranked from excellent to competent to poor. Cassidy argues that those who can foresee being poor parents, or even merely competent ones, should opt not to parent.
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  31. Lisa Cassidy (2001). That Many of Us Should Not Parent. Hypatia 21 (4):40-57.
  32. Marguerite la Caze (2005). Love, That Indispensable Supplement: Irigaray and Kant on Love and Respect. Hypatia 20 (3):92-114.
  33. Marc Champagne (2016). Peat Bogs, Sperm, and Family Values: Teaching Naturalism Charitably. Sexuality and Culture 20.
    Introductory courses dealing with sex, gender and sexuality often assign excerpts from Thomas Aquinas as an exemplar of the naturalist view. Given that most novice students tend to side against such naturalism uncritically, they need to be exposed to a more charitable account of the biological considerations motivating a stance like Aquinas.’ With that in mind, this article presents accessible arguments aimed at restoring deliberative balance in the classroom.
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  34. Matt Cherry (1998). Introduction: Rescuing Family Values. Free Inquiry 19.
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  35. Patricia Hill Collins (1998). It's All in the Family: Intersections of Gender, Race, and Nation. Hypatia 13 (3):62 - 82.
    Intersectionality has attracted substantial scholarly attention in the 1990s. Rather than examining gender, race, class, and nation as distinctive social hierarchies, intersectionality examines how they mutually construct one another. I explore how the traditional family ideal functions as a privileged exemplar of intersectionality in the United States. Each of its six dimensions demonstrates specific connections between family as a gendered system of social organization, racial ideas and practices, and constructions of U.S. national identity.
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  36. Brittany Crockett (2009). A Study of Documentary Sources Relating to Women's Right to Divorce in Ancient Judea. Constellations 1 (1).
    This paper examines the concept and treatment of divorce in ancient Judea as a historical reality rather than a theological issue, focusing particularly on the idea of the wife as the active party in the divorce. Did women in Judea have the right to initiate divorce? It seems the answer might have been yes. The implications of several key documentary sources, including various marriage and legal contracts relating to divorce are discussed. The paper concludes with a brief look at several (...)
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  37. Stephen M. Crow & Dinah Payne (1992). Affirmative Action for a Face Only a Mother Could Love? Journal of Business Ethics 11 (11):869 - 875.
    Physical attractiveness is highly valued in our society and impacts a variety of decisions made by organizations. Generally speaking, research findings suggest that the more attractive the person, the greater the likelihood of favorable employment-related decisions. It follows then, that those considered physically unattractive will suffer adversely in some employment-related decisional contexts — decisions that may prevent them from achieving the good life. Until recently, discrimination against unattractive people has been considered nothing more than a moral or ethical issue. However, (...)
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  38. Ezio Di Nucci (2016). IVF, Same-Sex Couples and the Value of Biological Ties. Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (12):784-787.
    Ought parents, in general, to value being biologically tied to their children? Is it important, in particular, that both parents be biologically tied to their children? I will address these fundamental questions by looking at a fairly new practice within IVF treatments, so-called IVF-with-ROPA ( Reception of Oocytes from Partner ), which allows lesbian couples to „share motherhood‟ with one partner providing the eggs while the other becomes pregnant. I believe that IVF-with-ROPA is, just like other IVF treatments, morally permissible; (...)
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  39. Jean Bethke Elshtain (1982). The Family in Political Thought. University of Massachusetts Press,1982.
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  40. Ellen K. Feder (2007). Family Bonds: Genealogies of Race and Gender. OUP Usa.
    Ellen Feder's monograph is an attempt to think about the categories of race and gender together. She explains and then employs some critical tools derived from Foucault , in order to advance her main argument: that the institution of the family is the locus of the production of gender and race, and that gender is best understood as a function of a "disciplinary" power that operates within the family, while race is the function of a "regulatory" power acting upon the (...)
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  41. Ann Ferguson (2007). Gay Marriage: An American and Feminist Dilemma. Hypatia 22 (1):39-57.
    : Gay marriage highlights a contradiction in American national identity: if gay marriage is supported, the normative status of the heterosexual nuclear family is undermined, while if not, the civil rights of homosexuals are undermined. This essay discusses the feminist dilemma of whether to support gay marriage to promote these individual civil rights or whether to critique marriage as a part of the patriarchal system that oppresses women.
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  42. Ann Ferguson (1991). Sexual Democracy: Women, Oppression and Revolution. Westview.
    This is a book in feminist theory and social and political philosophy. Many of the chapters are versions of earlier papers published as journal articles and as book chapters. It presents a multi-systems theory of social domination, discussing three main ones: economic class, gender and (social) race. It presents a maerialist feminist theory of gender and sexuality and discusses lesbian identity as well as issues of motherhood.
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  43. Rachel Fredericks (2013). Review of Christine Overall, Why Have Children? The Ethical Debate. [REVIEW] Hypatia Reviews Online.
  44. Shelley Am Gavigan (1997). Feminism, Familial Ideology, and Family Law: A Perilous Menage a Trois. In Hilde Lindemann (ed.), Feminism and Families. Routledge
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  45. Kathleen Gerson (2011). The Unfinished Revolution: Coming of Age in a New Era of Gender, Work, and Family. OUP Usa.
    The vast changes in family life have often been blamed for declining morality and unhappy children. Drawing upon pioneering research with the children of the gender revolution, Kathleen Gerson reveals that it is not a lack of family values, but rigid social and economic forces that make it difficult to live out those values. The Unfinished Revolution makes clear recommendations for a new flexibility at work and at home that benefits families, encourages a thriving economy, and helps women and men (...)
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  46. Anca Gheaus (forthcoming). Gender and Distributive Justice. In Serena Olsaretti (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Distributive Justice. Oxford University Press
    This chapter discusses gender in relation to the most influential current accounts of distributive justice. There are various disparities in the benefits and burdens of social cooperation between women and men. Which of these, if any, one identifies as indicative of gender injustice will depend on the theory of distributive justice that one endorses. Theoretical decisions concerning the role of personal responsibility, the goods whose distribution is relevant for justice, and the site of justice - institutions-only or individual behaviour, too (...)
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  47. Anca Gheaus (2016). The Normative Importance of Pregnancy Challenges Surrogacy Contracts. Analize. Journal of Gender and Feminist Studies 6 (20):20-31.
    Birth mothers usually have a moral right to parent their newborns in virtue of a mutual attachment formed, during gestation, between the gestational mother and the fetus. The attachment is formed, in part, thanks to the burdens of pregnancy, and it serves the interest of the newborn; the gestational mother, too, has a powerful interest in the protection of this attachment. Given its justification, the right to parent one's gestated baby cannot be transferred at will to other people who would (...)
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  48. Anca Gheaus (2013). Care Drain as an Issue of Global Gender Justice. Ethical Perspectives 20 (1).
    The gendered division of labour in combination with the feminisation of international migration contribute to shortages of care, a phenomenon often called ‘care drain’. I argue that this phenomenon is an issue of global gender justice. I look at two methodological challenges and favourably analyse the suggestions that care drain studies should include the effects of fathers’ and other male caregivers’ migration and, in some cases, the effects of migration within national borders. I also explain why care drain is a (...)
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  49. Valerie A. Hartouni (1986). Antigone's Dilemma: A Problem in Political Membership. Hypatia 1 (1):3 - 20.
    What constitutes an adequate basis for feminist consciousness? What values and concerns are feminists to bring to bear in challenging present standards of well-being and articulating alternative visions of collective life? This essay takes a close and critical look at these questions as they are addressed in the work of political theorist Jean Elshtain. An outspoken defender of "pro-family feminism," Elshtain has urged contemporary feminists to reclaim the "female subject" within the private sphere. Enormous problems attend Elshtain's counsel and these (...)
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  50. Eva Feder Kittay (2013). The Body as the Place of Care. In Donald A. Landes & Azucena Cruz-Pierre (eds.), Exploring the Work of Edward S. Casey. Bloomsbury Publishing,
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