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  1. Kim Atkins (2011). You've Changed: Sex Reassignment and Personal Identity. Edited by Laurie J. Shrage. Hypatia 26 (4):877-881.
  2. Talia Bettcher & Ann Garry (2009). Introduction to Hypatia Special Issue: ‘‘Transgender Studies and Feminism: Theory, Politics, and Gendered Realities. Hypatia 23 (4):1-10.
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  3. Talia Bettcher & Ann Garry (2009). Introduction. Hypatia 24 (3):1-10.
  4. P. Cardon (2010). Post-Queer: In Defense of a 'Trans-Gender Approach' or Trans-Gender as an Analytical Category. Diogenes 57 (1):138-150.
    The notion of gender, introduced into France by queens and drags in the late 20th century (the glorious period of the "drag-queens") and revitalized by American "queer", follows a traditionally feminist path where homosexual and particularly male issues are once again being hidden away. Having played a big part in popularizing that first version, Patrick Cardon proposes, in order to avoid any misunderstanding and escape once for all from any attempts at reification, to use the term and the universal notion (...)
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  5. C. Jacob Hale (2008). Sex Change, Social Change: Reflections on Identity, Institutions, and Imperialism by Viviane Namaste. Hypatia 23 (1):204-207.
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  6. Moya Lloyd (2013). Heteronormativity and/as Violence: The “Sexing” of Gwen Araujo. Hypatia 28 (4):818-834.
    This paper will examine the violence of heteronormativity: the violence that constitutes and regulates bodies according to normative notions of sex, gender, and sexuality. This violence, I will argue, requires more than a focus on gendered or sexualized physical harms of the kinds normally examined when studying violence against sexual minorities or women. Rather, it necessitates focusing on the multiple modalities through which heteronormativity performs its violence on, through, and against bodies and persons, including through the production of certain bodies (...)
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  7. Jennifer McWeeny (2011). The Reversibility of Teacher and Student: Teaching/Learning Intersectionality and Activism Amidst the LGBTQ Protest. American Philosophical Association Newsletter on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Issues 10 (2):5-12.
  8. Marla Morton-Brown (2004). Artificial Ef-Femination. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 11 (1):27-34.
    Many feminist and queer scholars believe that one way to fight racism, sexism and homophobia is to challenge identity labels---ideas of what it means to be “black,” “gay,” “white,” “woman,” “lesbian.” Biology, however, continues to thwart this political agenda; the Body---the biological reality of skin color and sex chromosomes---makes it difficult to propose the idea that identity labels are merely social constructs, not natural facts. Female bodybuilding is a performance that literalizes the body as a site of artificial construction, of (...)
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  9. Christine Overall (2004). Transsexualism and “Transracialism”. Social Philosophy Today 20:183-193.
    This paper explores, from a feminist perspective, the justification of major surgical reshaping of the body. I define “transracialism” as the use of surgery to assist individuals to “cross” from being a member of one race to being a member of another. If transsexualism, involving the use of surgery to assist individuals to “cross” from female to male or from male to female, is morally acceptable, and if providing the medical and social resources to enable sex crossing is not morally (...)
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  10. Jeremy Pierce (2011). Review of Gender, Bullying, and Harassment. [REVIEW] Men and Masculinities (14):630-632.
  11. Rupert Read (2013). Feminism and Trans-Women. The Philosophers' Magazine 61 (61):26-28.
  12. Laurie Shrage (2010). Does the Government Need to Know Your Sex? Journal of Political Philosophy 20 (2):225-247.
  13. Laurie J. Shrage (ed.) (2009). You've Changed: Sex Reassignment and Personal Identity. OUP USA.
    Is sex identity a feature of one's mind or body, and is it a relational or intrinsic property? Who is in the best position to know a person's sex, do we each have a true sex, and is a person's sex an alterable characteristic? When a person's sex assignment changes, has the old self disappeared and a new one emerged; or, has only the public presentation of one's self changed? "You've Changed" examines the philosophical questions raised by the phenomenon of (...)
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