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  1. Linda Martín Alcoff (2009). Discourses of Sexual Violence in a Global Framework. Philosophical Topics 37 (2):123-139.
    In this paper I make a preliminary analysis of Western (or global North) discourses on sexual violence, focusing on the important concepts of “consent” and “victim.” The concept of “consent” is widely used to determine whether sexual violence has occurred, and it is the focal point of debates over the legitimacy of statutory offenses and over the way we characterize sex work done under conditions involving economic desperation. The concept of “victim” is shunned by many feminists and nonfeminists alike for (...)
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  2. Rita Alfonso & Jo Trigilio (1997). Surfing the Third Wave: A Dialogue Between Two Third Wave Feminists. Hypatia 12 (3):7-16.
    As third wave feminist philosophers attending graduate schools in different parts of the country, we decided to use our e-mail discussion as the format for presenting our thinking on the subject of third wave feminism. Our dialogue takes us through the subjects of postmodernism, the relationship between theory and practice, the generation gap, and the power relations associated with feminist philosophy as an established part of the academy.
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  3. Gill Allwood (1998). French Feminisms: Gender and Violence in Contemporary Theory. Ucl Press.
    This title available in eBook format. Click here for more information . Visit our eBookstore at: www.ebookstore.tandf.co.uk.
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  4. Alison Bailey (1994). Mothering, Diversity, and Peace Politics. Hypatia 9 (2):188-198.
  5. Amrita Banerjee (2008). Follett's Pragmatist Ontology of Relations: Potentials for a Feminist Perspective on Violence. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 22 (1):pp. 3-11.
  6. Bat-Ami Bar On (1996). Introduction. Hypatia 11 (4):1-4.
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  7. David Brax & Christian Munthe (2013). Part I: Introduction to the Philosophy of Hate Crime. In The Philosophy of Hate Crime Anthology. University of Gothenburg.
  8. David Brax & Christian Munthe (2013). The Philosophy of Hate Crime Anthology. University of Gothenburg.
    Introductory anthology to the philosophy of hate crime, written in the EU project "When Law and Hate Collide".
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  9. Judith Butler (2006). Violence, Non-Violence. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 27 (1):3-24.
  10. Claudia Card (1997). Addendum to "Rape as a Weapon of War". Hypatia 12 (2):216 - 218.
    Learning about martial sex crimes against men has made me rethink some of my ideas about rape as a weapon of war and how to respond to it. Such crimes can be as racist as they are sexist and, in the case of male victims, may be quite simply racist.
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  11. Samuel Allen Chambers (2008). Judith Butler and Political Theory: Troubling Politics. Routledge.
  12. Meda Chesney-Lind (1999). Contextualizing Women's Violence and Aggression: Beyond Denial and Demonization. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (2):222-223.
    This commentary focuses on the role played by constructions of women's violence in the maintenance of male control over women. While actual women's violence tends to be denied, pathologized or minimized, cultural constructions (particularly in the media) of women's violence tend to demonize it. Both of these androcentric cultural processes fail to illuminate the actual sources of the gender gap in violent behavior and instead tend to normalize male aggression and to cultivate female passivity.
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  13. Sharon Cowan (2014). Motivating Questions and Partial Answers: A Response to Prosecuting Domestic Violence by Michelle Madden Dempsey. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 8 (3):543-555.
    Michelle Madden Dempsey’s compelling book sets out a normative feminist argument as to why and when prosecutors should continue to pursue prosecutions in domestic violence cases where the victim refuses to participate in or has withdrawn their support for the prosecution. This paper will explore two of the key aspects of her argument—the centrality and definition of the concept of patriarchy, and the definition of domestic violence—before concluding with some final thoughts as to the appropriate parameters of feminist prosecutorial decision-making. (...)
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  14. Claire P. Curtis (2003). Sexual Harassment. Teaching Philosophy 26 (1):111-114.
  15. Tom Dougherty (2013). No Way Around Consent: A Reply to Rubenfeld on 'Rape-by-Deception'. Yale Jaw Journal Online 123:321-333.
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  16. Marian Eide (2008). "The Stigma of Nation": Feminist Just War, Privilege, and Responsibility. Hypatia 23 (2):pp. 48-60.
    If women are not yet accorded the full rights of citizenship internationally and especially in the military context, a feminist position on just war may have to be provisional. Drawing on Virginia Woolf's argument referenced in the title, Eide suggests in this essay that feminist theory develop its principles from women's exclusion from national privileges and argues that jus post bellum or justice after war be central to feminist theories of just war.
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  17. Jean Bethke Elshtain (1985). Reflections on War and Political Discourse: Realism, Just War, and Feminism in a Nuclear Age. Political Theory 13 (1):39-57.
  18. Mary Anne Franks (2003). Obscene Undersides: Women and Evil Between the Taliban and the United States. Hypatia 18 (1):135-156.
    : This paper proposes to supplement an American self-identity predicated on a model of absolute difference from the Taliban (good versus evil, etc.) by exploring affinities between their respective ideologies. The place of "woman," within and through the preponderance of sexual exploitation/violence common to both, is the starting point of this analysis. This article reads the two conflicting powers in a Lacanian/Zizekian dyad of the "Law" and its "obscene superego underside.".
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  19. Deidre Nicole Green (2013). Works of Love in a World of Violence: Kierkegaard, Feminism, and the Limits of Self‐Sacrifice. Hypatia 28 (3):568-584.
    Feminist scholars adopt wide-ranging views of self-sacrifice: their critiques claim that women are inordinately affected by Christianity's valorization of self-sacrifice and that this traditional Christian value is inherently misogynistic and necrophilic. Although Søren Kierkegaard's Works of Love deems Christian love essentially sacrificial, love, in his view, sets significant limits on the role of self-sacrifice in human life. Through his proposed response to one who requests forgiveness, “Do you now truly love me?” Kierkegaard offers a model of forgiveness that subverts traditional (...)
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  20. Christine E. Gudorf (2011). Feminist Approaches to Religion and Torture. Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (4):613-621.
    Feminists look critically at any infliction of pain on others, usually requiring that it be consensual, and often both consensual and for the benefit of the person afflicted. Most torture of women is not recognized under official definitions of torture because it is not performed by or with the consent of (government) officials. Women are, however, also victims of torture under official definitions as military or civilian prisoners or as members of defeated populations in war, and are more often subjected (...)
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  21. Susan Hanks (1984). The Sexual Revolution and Violence Against Women. In Gregory Baum, John Aloysius Coleman & Marcus Lefébure (eds.), The Sexual Revolution. T. & T. Clark.
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  22. Renee Heberle (2001). Book Review: Stanley G. French, Wanda Teays, and Laura M. Purdy. Violence Against Women: Philosophical Perspectives. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 1998. [REVIEW] Hypatia 16 (2):93-97.
  23. Renee Heberle (2001). Violence Against Women: Philosophical Perspectives (Review). Hypatia 16 (2):93-97.
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  24. Karen Houle (2006). The Manifolds of Violences. Hypatia 21 (2):184 - 195.
    : In this essay, Houle focuses in on the ways in which a Foucauldian-framed account of violence, such as the one Gail Mason offers in Spectacles of Violence, rattles liberal (theoretical and 'common-sensical') understandings of culpability and lawfulness. Mason's analysis dares to suggest that violence is constitutive, not simply destructive of selves, of lives. Asking after the ways in which that constitution is asymmetrical in events of violence, Houle reintroduce some cautions and concerns about drawing from a poststructuralist perspective. This, (...)
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  25. Paul M. Hughes (1999). Paternalism, Battered Women, and the Law. Journal of Social Philosophy 30 (1):18-28.
  26. Elisa A. Hurley (2010). Pharmacotherapy to Blunt Memories of Sexual Violence: What's a Feminist to Think? Hypatia 25 (3):527 - 552.
    it has recently been discovered that propranolol — a beta-blocker traditionally used to treat cardiac arrhythmias and hypertension — might disrupt the formation of the emotionally disturbing memories that typically occur in the wake of traumatic events and consequently prevent the onset of trauma-induced psychological injuries such as Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. One context in which the use of propranolol is generating interest in both the popufor and scientific press is sexual violence. Nevertheless, feminists have so far not weighed in on (...)
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  27. Laura Duhan Kaplan (1998). Feminist Accused of Sexual Harassment (Review). Philosophy and Literature 22 (2):521-523.
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  28. Timothy Kaufman-Osborn (2008). Gender Trouble at Abu Ghraib? In Terrell Carver & Samuel Allen Chambers (eds.), Judith Butler's Precarious Politics: Critical Encounters. Routledge.
  29. Moya Lloyd (2013). Heteronormativity and/as Violence: The “Sexing” of Gwen Araujo. Hypatia 28 (4):818-834.
    This paper will examine the violence of heteronormativity: the violence that constitutes and regulates bodies according to normative notions of sex, gender, and sexuality. This violence, I will argue, requires more than a focus on gendered or sexualized physical harms of the kinds normally examined when studying violence against sexual minorities or women. Rather, it necessitates focusing on the multiple modalities through which heteronormativity performs its violence on, through, and against bodies and persons, including through the production of certain bodies (...)
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  30. Gail Mason (2006). The Book at a Glance. Hypatia 21 (2):174-177.
    : Violence is a spectacle. Not because it is simply something that we observe but, more fundamentally, because it is a mechanism through which we observe and define other things. Violence has the capacity to shape the ways that we see, and thereby come to know, these things. In other words, violence is more than a practice that acts upon the bodies of individual subjects to inflict harm and injury. It is, metaphorically speaking, also a way of looking at these (...)
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  31. Margaret A. Mclaren (2003). Book Review: Bat-Ami Bar On. The Subject of Violence: Arendtean Exercises in Understanding. Lanham, Md.: Rowman and Littlefield, 2002. [REVIEW] Hypatia 18 (2):205-208.
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  32. Catherine Mills (2007). Normative Violence, Vulnerability, and Responsibility. Differences 18 (2):133--156.
  33. María Pía Lara (2004). Claudia Card's Atrocity Paradigm. Hypatia 19 (4):184-191.
  34. Lisa M. Poupart (2003). The Familiar Face of Genocide: Internalized Oppression Among American Indians. Hypatia 18 (2):86-100.
    : Virtually nonexistent in traditional American Indian communities, today American Indian women and children experience family violence at rates similar to those of the dominant culture. This article explores violence within American Indian communities as an expression of internalized oppression and as an extension of Euro-American violence against American Indian nations.
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  35. Joshua M. Price (2002). The Apotheosis of Home and the Maintenance of Spaces of Violence. Hypatia 17 (4):39-70.
    : The "Home" is ideologically understood as a place of safety and refuge. Such an account cloaks violence against women. The voices of battered women can disrupt that dominant construction of the space of the home, a construction typified by the work of Gaston Bachelard. The space that Bachelard presupposes and theorizes as given is in fact being-produced, cleaned, and organized by people who themselves may not find in it any solace or respite.
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  36. Michael Staudigl (2013). Towards a Relational Phenomenology of Violence. Human Studies 36 (1):43-66.
    This article elaborates a relational phenomenology of violence. Firstly, it explores the constitution of all sense in its intrinsic relation with our embodiment and intercorporality. Secondly, it shows how this relational conception of sense and constitution paves the path for an integrative understanding of the bodily and symbolic constituents of violence. Thirdly, the author addresses the overall consequences of these reflections, thereby identifying the main characteristics of a relational phenomenology of violence. In the final part, the paper provides an exemplification (...)
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  37. Christopher Heath Wellman (2006). A Defense of Stiffer Penalties for Hate Crimes. Hypatia 21 (2):62-80.
    : After defining a hate crime as an offense in which the criminal selects the victim at least in part because of an animus toward members of the group to which the victim belongs, this essay surveys the standard justifications for state punishment en route to defending the permissibility of imposing stiffer penalties for hate crimes. It also argues that many standard instances of rape and domestic battery are hate crimes and may be punished as such.
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  38. Iris Marion Young (2003). Feminist Reactions to the Contemporary Security Regime. Hypatia 18 (1):223 - 231.
    : The essay theorizes the logic of masculinist protection as an apparently benign form of male domination. It then argues that authoritarian government is often justified through a logic of masculinist protection, and that this is the form of justification for the security regime that has emerged in the United States since September 11, 2001. I argue that those who live under a security regime live within an oppressive protection racket. The paper ends by cautioning feminists not ourselves to adopt (...)
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