This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
22 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
  1. Alison Bailey (1994). Mothering, Diversity, and Peace Politics. Hypatia 9 (2):188-198.
  2. Bat-Ami Bar On (2008). Introduction: Thinking About War. Hypatia 23 (2).
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Bat-Ami Bar On (2008). The Opposition of Politics and War. Hypatia 23 (2):141-154.
  4. Sigal Ben-Porath (2008). Care Ethics and Dependence— Rethinking Jus Post Bellum. Hypatia 23 (2):pp. 61-71.
    In this essay, Ben-Porath begins from the assumption that just war theory should be extended to include a jus post bellum component. Postwar conduct should be significantly informed by a care ethics perspective, particularly its political aspects as developed by Joan Tronto and others. Care ethics should be extended to the international postwar arena with one significant amendment, namely, weakening the aim of ending dependence.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Claudia Card (2003). Questions Regarding a War on Terrorism. Hypatia 18 (1):164 - 169.
    : The concept of a war on terrorism creates havoc with attempts to apply rules of war. For "terrorism" is not an agent. Nor is it clear what relationship to terrorism agents must have in order to be legitimate targets. Nor is it clear what kinds of terrorism count. Would a war on terrorism in the home be a justifiable response to domestic battering? If not, do similar objections apply to a war on public terrorism?
    Remove from this list | Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. J. Daryl Charles (2006). War, Women, and Political Wisdom: Jean Bethke Elshtain on the Contours of Justice. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 34 (2):339 - 369.
    One of the most perceptive and ambidextrous social commentators of our day, Augustinian scholar Jean Bethke Elshtain furnishes in ever fresh ways through her writings a bridge between the ancient and the modern, between politics and ethics, between timeless moral wisdom and cultural sensitivity. To read Elshtain seriously is to take the study of culture as well as the "permanent things" seriously. But Elshtain is no mere moralist. Neither is she content solely to dwell in the domain of the theoretical. (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Drucilla Cornell (2003). Facing Our Humanity. Hypatia 18 (1):170 - 174.
    : This article argues that U.S. aggression against Afghanistan must be challenged through our support of the Revolutionary Association of the Women of Afghanistan (RAWA) and their political program. It does so not only by considering competing judgments about what constitutes women's rights, but also through an appeal to the Kantian ideal of humanity and its relation to how we can re-think both terrorism and the treatment of those accused of terrorist activity.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Chris J. Cuomo (2004). Philosophical Sisters, Incite! Hypatia 19 (4):235 - 238.
    Editor's note: this is the second essay in Hypatia's series of musings. We welcome reflections on the state of the profession, the life of the independent scholar, political activism, teaching, publishing, or other topics of interest to feminist philosophers. We particularly invite submissions that pick up conversational threads begun by earlier contributions to the column, so that Musings becomes a forum for talking to one another. If you have an idea for the column, please tell us about it.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Margaret Denike (2008). The Human Rights of Others: Sovereignty, Legitimacy, and "Just Causes" for the "War on Terror". Hypatia 23 (2):pp. 95-121.
    In this essay, Denike assesses the appropriation of international human rights by humanitarian law and policy of "security states." She maps representations of the perpetrators and victims of "tyranny" and "terror, " and their role in providing a "just cause" for the U.S.–led "war on terror. " By examining narratives of progress and human rights heroism Denike shows how human rights discourses, when used together with the pretense of self-defense and preemptive war, do the opposite of what they claim—entrenching the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Marian Eide (2008). "The Stigma of Nation": Feminist Just War, Privilege, and Responsibility. Hypatia 23 (2):pp. 48-60.
    If women are not yet accorded the full rights of citizenship internationally and especially in the military context, a feminist position on just war may have to be provisional. Drawing on Virginia Woolf's argument referenced in the title, Eide suggests in this essay that feminist theory develop its principles from women's exclusion from national privileges and argues that jus post bellum or justice after war be central to feminist theories of just war.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Jean Bethke Elshtain (1985). Reflections on War and Political Discourse: Realism, Just War, and Feminism in a Nuclear Age. Political Theory 13 (1):39-57.
  12. Christine E. Gudorf (2011). Feminist Approaches to Religion and Torture. Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (4):613-621.
    Feminists look critically at any infliction of pain on others, usually requiring that it be consensual, and often both consensual and for the benefit of the person afflicted. Most torture of women is not recognized under official definitions of torture because it is not performed by or with the consent of (government) officials. Women are, however, also victims of torture under official definitions as military or civilian prisoners or as members of defeated populations in war, and are more often subjected (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Alison M. Jaggar (2003). Responding to the Evil of Terrorism. Hypatia 18 (1):175 - 182.
    : In this paper, I distinguish terrorism from other crimes and from war, noting that terrorism may be perpetrated not only by private individuals and members of nonstate organizations, but also that it may be ordered by the state. Since terrorism is illegal almost everywhere, I argue that the proper response to it is usually through law enforcement rather than military measures. In some circumstances, however, I content that even law enforcement procedures may be used by the state to terrorize (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Kelly Oliver (2010). Media Representations of Women and the “Iraq War”. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry 5 (12):14-22.
    This essay examines media images of women in recent conflicts in the Middle East. From the Abu Ghraib prison abuses to protests in Iran, women have become the public face of violence, carried out and suffered. Women’s bodies are figured as sexual and violent, a potent combination that stirs public imagination and feeds into stereotypes of women as femme fatales or “bombshells.”.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Kelly Oliver (2008). Women: The Secret Weapon of Modern Warfare? Hypatia 23 (2):pp. 1-16.
    The images from wars in the Middle East that haunt us are those of young women killing and torturing. Their media circulated stories share a sense of shock. They have both galvanized and confounded debates over feminism and women's equality. And, as Oliver argues in this essay, they share, perhaps subliminally, the problematic notion of women as both offensive and defensive weapons of war, a notion that is symptomatic of fears of women's "mysterious" powers.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Bat-Ami Bar On (2008). Introduction: Thinking About War. Hypatia 23 (2).
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Bat-Ami Bar On (2008). The Opposition of Politics and War. Hypatia 23 (2):pp. 141-154.
    At stake for this essay is the distinction between politics and war and the extent to which politics can survive war. Gender analysis reveals how high these stakes are by revealing the complexity of militarism. It also reveals the impossibility of gender identity as foundation for a more robust politics with respect to war. Instead, a non-ideal normative differentiation among kinds of violence is affirmed as that which politically cannot not be wanted.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Danielle Poe (2010). Women as Weapons of War: Iraq, Sex, and the Media. By KELLY OLIVER. Hypatia 25 (2):469-472.
  19. Danielle Poe (2008). Replacing Just War Theory with an Ethics of Sexual Difference. Hypatia 23 (2):pp. 33-47.
    This essay argues that the flaws of just war theory should lead us to develop a new approach to living with others. Danielle Poe begins her argument with a description of just war theory and its failures. In the next section, Poe discusses the philosophy of Bat-Ami Bar On and Luce Irigaray in order to construct ethical commitments between people. These ethical commitments come from concrete acts of empathy, such as relationships of compassion, kindness, and hospitality. Finally, Poe considers how (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Jennifer Purvis (2008). Women as Weapons of War: Iraq, Sex, and the Media (Review). Journal of Speculative Philosophy 22 (4):pp. 316-319.
  21. Robin May Schott (2008). Just War and the Problem of Evil. Hypatia 23 (2):pp. 122-140.
    In this essay, Robin May Schott criticizes leading proponents of just war theory and introduces the notion of justifiable but illegitimate violence. Instead of legitimating some wars as just, it is better to acknowledge that both the situation of war and moral judgments about war are ambiguous. Schott raises the questions: What are alternative narratives of war? And what are alternative narratives to war? Such narratives are necessary for addressing the concepts of evil and of witnessing in the ethical discourse (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Robin May Schott (2004). The Atrocity Paradigm and the Concept of Forgiveness. Hypatia 19 (4):204 - 211.
    In this article I discuss Claudia Card's treatment of war rape in relation to her discussion of the victim's moral power of forgiveness. I argue that her analysis of the victim's power to withhold forgiveness overlooks the paradoxical structure of witnessing, which implies that there is an ungraspable dimension of atrocity. In relation to this ungraspable element, the proposal that victims of atrocity have the power to either offer or withhold forgiveness may have little relevance.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation