About this topic
Summary Feminist ethics covers a range of gender-specific social justice and moral questions.  This sub-discipline is concerned with the values and virtues of both the individual and the community via feminist and woman-centered approaches and responses to mainstream ethics and moral theory, especially liberalism and communitarianism.  More specifically, feminist ethics spans traditional ethics and political philosophy, the public and private domains, and individual vs. community analyses to demonstrate the extent and importance of private values in the public sphere and vice versa.  Additionally, this field aims to highlight deficiencies in philosophies (potentially, conceivably, explicitly) connected to matters of justice due to theoretical and practical gender-based exclusion.  One core goal of this sub-discipline is to broaden philosophical inclusiveness beyond gender concerns by paying attention to and emphasizing issues related to privilege, power, and intersectionality. 
Key works There are a number of anthologies that best represent the contemporary research in Feminist Ethics.  See: Calhoun 2004 (Setting the Moral Compass: Essays by Women Philosophers), DesAutels & Waugh 2001 (Feminists Doing Ethics), Meyers 1997 (Feminists Rethink the Self), Calhoun 2006 (Moral Psychology: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory), and Bushnell et al 1995 (Nagging Questions).  Divergent canonical texts include Walker 2007, Anderson 1999, Held 2006, Lugones 1987, and Narayan 1995.
Introductions Lindemann 2005 (An Invitation to Feminist Ethics); Card 1999 (Feminist Ethics and Politics); Wisnant et al 2010 (Global Feminist Ethics).
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  1. Julia J. Aaron (2004). Recent Contributions to Feminist Ethics. Hypatia 19 (2):201-208.
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  2. Julia J. Aaron (2004). Book Review: Elizabeth Porter. Recent Contributions to Feminist Ethics: A Review of Feminist Perspectives on Ethics Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Pearson Education, 1999); James Sterba. Three Challenges to Ethics; and Janna Thompson. Discourse and Knowledge. [REVIEW] Hypatia 19 (2):201-208.
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  3. Teresa Abada & Eric Y. Tenkorang (2012). Women's Autonomy and Unintended Pregnancies in the Philippines. Journal of Biosocial Science 44 (6):703-718.
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  4. Ruth Abbey (1996). Beyond Misogyny and Metaphor: Women in Nietzsche's Middle Period. Journal of the History of Philosophy 34 (2):233-256.
    This article proposes a third way of reading Nietzsche's remarks on women, one that goes beyond misogyny and metaphor. Taking the depiction of women in the works of the middle period at face value shows that these works neither entirely demean women nor exclude them from the higher life. Nietzsche's middle period comprises HAH (1879-80, which includes "Assorted Opinions and Maxims" and "The Wanderer and His Shadow"), D (1881) and GS (1882). The works of this period do not disqualify women (...)
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  5. Pamela Abbott & Claire Wallace (eds.) (1991). Gender, Power, and Sexuality. Macmillan.
  6. Berit Åberg (2008). Explanations of Internal Sex Segregation in a Male Dominated Profession : The Police Force. In Anna G. Jónasdóttir & Kathleen B. Jones (eds.), The Political Interests of Gender Revisited: Redoing Theory and Research with a Feminist Face. United Nations University Press.
  7. Tineke A. Abma, Barth Oeseburg, Guy Am Widdershoven, Minke Goldsteen & Marian A. Verkerk (2005). Two Women with Multiple Sclerosis and Their Caregivers: Conflicting Normative Expectations. Nursing Ethics 12 (5):479-492.
    It is not uncommon that nurses are unable to meet the normative expectations of chronically ill patients. The purpose of this article is to describe and illustrate Walker’s expressive-collaborative view of morality to interpret the normative expectations of two women with multiple sclerosis. Both women present themselves as autonomous persons who make their own choices, but who also have to rely on others for many aspects of their lives, for example, to find a new balance between work and social contacts (...)
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  8. Martha Ackelsberg (2005). Women's Community Activism and the Rejection of 'Politics': Some Dilemmas of Popular Democratic Movements. In Marilyn Friedman (ed.), Women and Citizenship. Oup Usa. 67--90.
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  9. Felicia Ackerman (2002). "Always to Do Ladies, Damosels, and Gentlewomen Succour": Women and the Chivalric Code in Malory's Morte Darthur. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 26 (1):1–12.
    I am indebted to many people, especially Dorsey Armstrong, Shannon French, and Kenneth Hodges, for helpful discussions of this material. An early version of this essay was read at the Thirty-Sixth International Congress on Medieval Studies.This essay is dedicated to the glorious memory of Nina Lindsey.
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  10. Alison Adam (2002). Cyberstalking and Internet Pornography: Gender and the Gaze. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 4 (2):133-142.
    This paper is based on the premise that the analysis of some cyberethics problems would benefit from a feminist treatment. It is argued that both cyberstalking and Internet child pornography are two such areas which have a `gendered' aspect which has rarely been explored in the literature. Against a wide ranging feminist literature of potential relevance, the paper explores a number of cases through a focused approach which weaves together feminist concepts of privacy and the gaze.
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  11. Alison Adam (2002). Gender/Body/Machine. Ratio 15 (4):354–375.
    This article considers the question of embodiment in relation to gender and whether there are models of artificial intelligence (AI) which can enrol a concept of gender in their design. A central concern for feminist epistemology is the role of the body in the making of knowledge. I consider how this may inform a critique of the AI project and the related area of artificial life (A-Life), the latter area being of most interest in this paper. I explore briefly the (...)
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  12. Alison Adam (2000). Deleting the Subject: A Feminist Reading of Epistemology in Artificial Intelligence. Minds and Machines 10 (2):231-253.
    This paper argues that AI follows classical versions of epistemology in assuming that the identity of the knowing subject is not important. In other words this serves to `delete the subject''. This disguises an implicit hierarchy of knowers involved in the representation of knowledge in AI which privileges the perspective of those who design and build the systems over alternative perspectives. The privileged position reflects Western, professional masculinity. Alternative perspectives, denied a voice, belong to less powerful groups including women. Feminist (...)
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  13. Alison Adam & Jacqueline Ofori-Amanfo (2000). Does Gender Matter in Computer Ethics? Ethics and Information Technology 2 (1):37-47.
  14. Carol J. Adams (1994). Neither Man nor Beast: Feminism and the Defense of Animals. Continuum.
    In just a few years, the book became an underground classic. Neither Man Nor Beast takes Adams' thought one step further.
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  15. Carol J. Adams (1994). Bringing Peace Home: A Feminist Philosophical Perspective on the Abuse of Women, Children, and Pet Animals. Hypatia 9 (2):63 - 84.
    In this essay, I connect the sexual victimization of women, children, and pet animals with the violence manifest in a patriarchal culture. After discussing these connections, I demonstrate the importance of taking seriously these connections because of their implications for conceptual analysis, epistemology, and political, environmental, and applied philosophy. My goal is to broaden our understanding of issues relevant to creating peace and to provide some suggestions about what must be included in any adequate feminist peace politics.
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  16. Jane Adams (1995). Individualism, Efficiency, and Domesticity: Ideological Aspects of the Exploitation of Farm Families and Farm Women. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 12 (4):2-17.
    A complex conjuncture of ideological constructions obscured and rationalized the systematic exploitation of farm women. First, farming and homemaking, to which people cling in an attempt to avert the alienation of wage labor, provide a basis for evaluating one's labor in terms that, ironically, makes them vulnerable to super-exploitation. Second, agrarian ideologies, with their strongly patriarchal bias, did not allow women to understand themselves as public actors. Modernizing elite ideologies, specifically the equation of entrepreneurial individualism and efficiency with “progress” and (...)
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  17. Kathryn Pyne Addelson (1994). Moral Passages: Toward a Collectivist Moral Theory. Routledge.
    In Moral Passages, Kathryn Pyne Addelson presents an original moral theory suited for contemporary life and its moral problems. Her basic principle is that knowledge and morality are generated in collective action, and she develops it through a critical examination of theories in philosophy, sociology and women's studies, most of which hide the collective nature and as a result hide the lives and knowledge of many people. At issue are the questions of what morality is, and how moral theories (whether (...)
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  18. Kathryn Pyne Addelson (1991). Impure Thoughts: Essays on Philosophy, Feminism, & Ethics. Temple University Press.
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  19. Naomi Adelson (2008). Discourses of Stress, Social Inequities, and the Everyday Worlds of First Nations Women in a Remote Northern Canadian Community. Ethos 36 (3):316-333.
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  20. Gwen Adshead (2011). Same but Different: Constructions of Female Violence in Forensic Mental Health. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 4 (1):41-68.
    We are more alike than we are different.In male prisons, the agency and antisocial mindset of violent offenders is taken seriously in the pursuit of rehabilitation. Male offenders are expected to own full agency for their cruelty and violence to others, and to explore it in supported rehabilitative group-work programs. Such programs have been shown to be highly effective for some offenders and relate to a process of engaging with a new pro-social identity and taking responsibility for leading a "good (...)
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  21. Sarah Jane Aiston (2011). Equality, Justice and Gender: Barriers to the Ethical University for Women. Ethics and Education 6 (3):279 - 291.
    Academic women experience working in higher education differently to their male counterparts. This article argues that the unequal position of women academics is unethical, irrespective of whether one takes a consequentialist or deontological ethical position. By drawing on a range of international studies, the article explores the reasons for this inequity, suggesting that the ?cult of individual responsibility?, the positioning of women academics as ?other? and the impact of having a family are significant factors. Having identified the reasons why university (...)
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  22. Ramin Akbari & Leila Tajik (2012). Second-Language Teachers' Moral Knowledge Base: A Comparison Between Experienced and Less Experienced, Male and Female Practitioners. Journal of Moral Education 41 (1):39-59.
    The second-language teacher education community has become increasingly interested in the moral dimensions of teaching. Herein ELT practitioners? ?moral knowledge base?, as a window into their mental lives, has not received the attention it deserves. The present study was conducted to document likely differences between the frequencies of pedagogical and moral thought units of male and female, experienced and less experienced teachers, and to look deeply into participants? moral thought categories. Forty teachers participated in the project. Data were collected through (...)
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  23. Alia Al-Saji (2010). The Racialization of Muslim Veils: A Philosophical Analysis. Philosophy and Social Criticism 36 (8):875-902.
    This article goes behind stereotypes of Muslim veiling to ask after the representational structure underlying these images. I examine the public debate leading to the 2004 French law banning conspicuous religious signs in schools and French colonial attitudes to veiling in Algeria, in conjunction with discourses on the veil that have arisen in other western contexts. My argument is that western perceptions and representations of veiled Muslim women are not simply about Muslim women themselves. Rather than representing Muslim women, these (...)
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  24. Alia Al-Saji (2009). Muslim Women and the Rhetoric of Freedom. In Mariana Ortega & Linda Martín Alcoff (eds.), Constructing the Nation: A Race and Nationalism Reader. SUNY Press.
  25. Linda Alcoff (2008). Gender and Reproduction. Asian Journal of Women's Studies 14 (4):7-27.
    This paper provides a materialist approach to defining gender identity.
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  26. Linda Alcoff (ed.) (2006). Identity Politics Reconsidered. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Based on the ongoing work of the agenda-setting Future of Minority Studies national research project, Identity Politics Reconsidered reconceptualizes the scholarly and political significance of social identity. It focuses on the deployment of “identity” within ethnic-, women’s-, disability-, and gay and lesbian studies in order to stimulate discussion about issues that are simultaneously theoretical and practical, ranging from ethics and epistemology to political theory and pedagogical practice. This collection of powerful essays by both well-known and emerging scholars offers original answers (...)
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  27. Linda Alcoff (2000). Introduction to the Symposium on María Pía Lara's. Hypatia 15 (3).
  28. Linda Martin Alcoff (2005). The Metaphysics of Gender and Sexual Difference. In Barbara S. Andrew, Jean Clare Keller & Lisa H. Schwartzman (eds.), Feminist Interventions in Ethics and Politics: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    “It is certainly true, as nominalists have been concerned to acknowledge, that judgements about kinds are determined in part by human interests, projects, and practices. But the possibility that human interests, projects, and practices sometimes develop as they do because the real (physical or social) world is as it is suggests that this sort of dependence is not by itself an argument against essentialism.”.
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  29. Linda Martin Alcoff (2005). The Metaphysics of Gender and Sexual Difference. In Barbara S. Andrew, Jean Clare Keller & Lisa H. Schwartzman (eds.), Feminist Interventions in Ethics and Politics: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    “It is certainly true, as nominalists have been concerned to acknowledge, that judgements about kinds are determined in part by human interests, projects, and practices. But the possibility that human interests, projects, and practices sometimes develop as they do because the real (physical or social) world is as it is suggests that this sort of dependence is not by itself an argument against essentialism.”.
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  30. Linda Martín Alcoff (2000). Introduction to the Symposium on Mar�a P�a Lara's Moral Textures: Feminist Narratives in the Public Sphere. Hypatia 15 (3):161-162.
  31. Linda Alcoff & Eva Feder Kittay (eds.) (2007). The Blackwell Guide to Feminist Philosophy. Blackwell Pub..
    The Blackwell Guide to Feminist Philosophy is a definitive introduction to the field, consisting of 15 newly-contributed essays that apply philosophical methods and approaches to feminist concerns. Offers a key view of the project of centering women’s experience. Includes topics such as feminism and pragmatism, lesbian philosophy, feminist epistemology, and women in the history of philosophy.
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  32. Hanan Alexander (2013). Caring and Agency: Noddings on Happiness in Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (5):488-493.
  33. Margaret Walker Alexander (1995). Black Women in Academia. In Beverly Guy-Sheftal (ed.), Words of Fire: An Anthology of African American Feminist Thought. The New Press.
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  34. Wijdan Ali (2003). Muslim Women: Between Cliché and Reality. Diogenes 50 (3):77-87.
    The clichés attached to Islam and Muslim women that the West had perpetuated since the Middle Ages and that were later propagated by Orientalist writers and painters, are reviewed in this article. The emergence of the subject of women as the centrepiece of western accounts of Islam in the late 19th century is equated with the beginning of European colonialism in Muslim countries, and the reasons for choosing the two controversial issues related to Muslim women: polygamy and the veil. It (...)
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  35. Amy Allen (2007). The Politics of Our Selves: Power, Autonomy, and Gender in Contemporary Critical Theory. Columbia University Press.
    Introduction : the politics of our selves -- Foucault, subjectivity, and the enlightenment : a critical reappraisal -- The impurity of practical reason : power and autonomy in Foucault -- Dependency, subordination, and recognition : Butler on subjection -- Empowering the lifeworld? autonomy and power in Habermas -- Contextualizing critical theory -- Engendering critical theory.
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  36. Amy Allen (1999). Solidarity After Identity Politics: Hannah Arendt and the Power of Feminist Theory. Philosophy and Social Criticism 25 (1):97-118.
    This paper argues that Hannah Arendt's political theory offers key insights into the power that binds together the feminist movement - the power of solidarity. Second-wave feminist notions of solidarity were grounded in notions of shared identity; in recent years, as such conceptions of shared identity have come under attack for being exclusionary and repressive, feminists have been urged to give up the idea of solidarity altogether. However, the choice between (repressive) identity and (fragmented) non-identity is a false opposition, and (...)
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  37. Amy Allen (1999). The Power of Feminist Theory: Domination, Resistance, Solidarity. Westview Press.
    Power is clearly a crucial concept for feminist theory. Insofar as feminists are interested in analyzing power, it is because they have an interest in understanding, critiquing, and ultimately challenging the multiple array of unjust power relations affecting women in contemporary Western societies, including sexism, racism, heterosexism, and class oppression.In The Power of Feminist Theory, Amy Allen diagnoses the inadequacies of previous feminist conceptions of power, and draws on the work of a diverse group of theorists of power, including Michel (...)
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  38. Anita Allen, Anika Maaza Mann, Donna-Dale L. Marcano, Michele Moody-Adams & Jacqueline Scott (2008). Situated Black Women's Voices in/on the Profession of Philosophy. Hypatia 23 (2):160-189.
  39. Anita Allen, Anika Maaza Mann, Donna-Dale L. Marcano, Michele Moody-Adams & Jacqueline Scott (2008). Situated Voices: Black Women in/on the Profession of Philosophy. Hypatia 23 (2):160 - 189.
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  40. Gill Allwood (1998). French Feminisms: Gender and Violence in Contemporary Theory. Ucl Press.
    This title available in eBook format. Click here for more information . Visit our eBookstore at: www.ebookstore.tandf.co.uk.
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  41. Sara Alpern (1990). Eating Disorders Among Women: An Historical Review of the Literature From a Women's History Perspective. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 7 (3-4):47-55.
    Within a relatively brief period of time, there has been a veritable outpouring of research on anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. This article presents a concise overview of some of the major works on these eating disorders from a variety of disciplines including biomedicine, psychology, sociology, and history. The article establishes a general context of Americans' preoccupation with food and diet. However, since the majority of those suffering from anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are female, this article places these eating (...)
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  42. Matthew C. Altman (2010). Kant on Sex and Marriage: The Implications for the Same-Sex Marriage Debate. Kant-Studien 101 (3):309-330.
    When examined critically, Kant's views on sex and marriage give us the tools to defend same-sex marriage on moral grounds. The sexual objectification of one's partner can only be overcome when two people take responsibility for one another's overall well-being, and this commitment is enforced through legal coercion. Kant's views on the unnaturalness of homosexuality do not stand up to scrutiny, and he cannot (as he often tries to) restrict the purpose of sex to procreation. Kant himself rules out marriage (...)
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  43. Marije Altorf (2011). After Cursing the Library: Iris Murdoch and the (In)Visibility of Women in Philosophy. Hypatia 26 (2):384-402.
    This article offers a critical reading of three major biographies of the British novelist and philosopher Iris Murdoch. It considers in particular how a limited concern for gender issues has hampered their portrayals of Murdoch as a creator of images and ideas. The biographies are then contrasted to a biographical sketch constructed from Murdoch's philosophical writing. The assessment of the biographies is set against the larger background of the relation between women and philosophy. In doing so, the paper offers a (...)
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  44. Ron Amundson & Shari Tresky (2007). On a Bioethical Challenge to Disability Rights. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 32 (6):541 – 561.
    Tensions exist between the disability rights movement and the work of many bioethicists. These reveal themselves in a major recent book on bioethics and genetics, From Chance to Choice: Genetics and Justice. This book defends certain genetic policies against criticisms from disability rights advocates, in part by arguing that it is possible to accept both the genetic policies and the rights of people with impairments. However, a close reading of the book reveals a series of direct moral criticisms of the (...)
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  45. Jimoh Amzat & Giovanni Grandi (2011). Gender Context of Personalism in Bioethics. Developing World Bioethics 11 (3):136-145.
    Personalism is one of the philosophical perspectives which hold that the reality in person and the human person has the highest intrinsic value. This paper makes reference to Louis Janssens' eight criteria in adequate consideration of the human person but further argues that there is need to consider people as situated agents especially within gender relational perspectives. The paper identifies gender as an important social construction that shapes the consideration of the human persons within socio-spatial spheres. The main crux of (...)
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  46. Christa Anbeek (2013). Women and the Art of Living: Three Women Writers on Death and Finitude. Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism 18 (2):89-104.
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  47. Elizabeth Anderson (1993). Value in Ethics and Economics. Harvard University Press.
    Women as commercial baby factories, nature as an economic resource, life as one big shopping mall: This is what we get when we use the market as a common ...
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  48. Elizabeth S. Anderson (2000). Why Commercial Surrogate Motherhood Unethically Commodifies Women and Children: Reply to McLachlan and Swales. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 8 (1):19-26.
    McLachlan and Swales dispute my arguments against commercial surrogatemotherhood. In reply, I argue that commercial surrogate contractsobjectionably commodify children because they regardparental rights over children not as trusts, to be allocated in the bestinterests of the child, but as like property rights, to be allocatedat the will o the parents. They also express disrespect for mothers, bycompromising their inalienable right to act in the best interest of theirchildren, when this interest calls for mothers to assert a custody rightin their children.
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  49. Jami L. Anderson (2009). Bodily Privacy, Toilets, and Sex Discrimination: The Problem of "Manhood" in a Women's Prison. In Olga Gershenson Barbara Penner (ed.), Ladies and Gents.
    Unjustifiable assumptions about sex and gender roles, the untamable potency of maleness, and gynophobic notions about women's bodies inform and influence a broad range of policy-making institutions in this society. In December 2004, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit continued this ignoble cultural pastime when they decided Everson v. Michigan Department of Corrections. In this decision, the Everson Court accepted the Michigan Department of Correction's claim that “the very manhood” of male prison guards both threatens the safety (...)
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  50. Jami L. Anderson (ed.) (2003). Race, Gender, and Sexuality: Philosophical Issues of Identity and Justice. Prentice Hall.
    This anthology of contemporary articles (and court cases provides a philosophical analysis of race, sex and gender concepts and issues. Divided into three relatively independent yet thematically linked sections, the anthology first addresses identity issues, then injustices and inequalities, and then specific social and legal issues relevant to race, sex and gender. By exposing readers to both theoretical foundations, opposing views, and "real life" applications, the anthology prepares them to make critically reasoned decisions concerning today's race, gender and sex social (...)
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