This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
91 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 91
  1. Linda Alcoff & Eva Feder Kittay (eds.) (2007). The Blackwell Guide to Feminist Philosophy. Blackwell Pub..
    The Blackwell Guide to Feminist Philosophy is a definitive introduction to the field, consisting of 15 newly-contributed essays that apply philosophical methods and approaches to feminist concerns. Offers a key view of the project of centering women’s experience. Includes topics such as feminism and pragmatism, lesbian philosophy, feminist epistemology, and women in the history of philosophy.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Carolyn Allen & Judith A. Howard (eds.) (2000). Provoking Feminisms. University of Chicago Press.
  3. Sonya Andermahr (1997). A Glossary of Feminist Theory. Distributed Exclusively in the Usa by St. Martin's Press.
    This glossary is both an introduction to the key words of feminist critical theories and a guide to their origins. Acknowledging the variety of contemporary feminist theories, the glossary includes entries on black, post-colonial, Italian, and French feminisms, and draws on a wide range of fields including semiotics, psychoanalysis, structuralism, poststructuralism, and deconstruction.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Barbara S. Andrew (2001). :A Companion to Feminist Philosophy. Ethics 112 (1):161-164.
    Empiricism, Rationality, Epistomology, Natural Sciences, Biological Sciences, Social Sciences, Moral Epistomology, Agency, Care.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Annette Baier (2001). Book Review. The Cambridge Companion to Feminism in Philosophy Miranda Fricker Jennifer Hornsby. [REVIEW] Mind 110 (438):464-468.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Alison Bailey & Chris Cuomo (2008). The Feminist Philosophy Reader. McGraw Hill.
    The most comprehensive anthology of feminist philosophy available, this first edition reader brings together over 55 of the most influential and time-tested works to have been published in the field of feminist philosophy. Featuring perspectives from across the philosophical spectrum, and from an array of different cultural vantage points, it displays the incredible range, diversity, and depth of feminist writing on fundamental issues, from the early second wave to the present.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Michèle Barrett & Anne Phillips (eds.) (1992). Destabilizing Theory: Contemporary Feminist Debates. Stanford University Press.
    In the past decade the central principles of western feminist theory have been dramatically challenged. many feminists have endorsed post-structuralism's rejection of essentialist theoretical categories, and have added a powerful gender dimension to contemporary critiques of modernity. Earlier 'women' have been radically undermined, and newer concerns with 'difference', 'identity', and 'power' have emerged. Destabilizing Theory explores these developments in a set of specially commissioned essays by feminist theorists. Does this change amount to a real shift within feminist theory, or will (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Sandra Bartky (1989). Philosophy and More Practical Pursuits: Philosophers and the Women's Movement. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 4 (3):57-60.
  9. Chris Beasley (1999). What is Feminism Anyway?: Understanding Contemporary Feminist Thought. Allen & Unwin.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Chris Beasley (1999). What is Feminism?: An Introduction to Feminist Theory. Sage.
    So what is feminism anyway? Why are all the experts so reluctant to give us a clear definition? Is it possible to make sense of the complex and often contradictory debates? In this concise and accessible introduction to feminist theory, Chris Beasley provides clear explanations of the many types of feminism. She outlines the development of liberal, radical and Marxist//socialist feminism, and reviews the more contemporary influences of psychoanalysis, postmodernism, theories of the body, queer theory, and attends to the ongoing (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Peter R. Beckman & Francine D'Amico (eds.) (1994). Women, Gender, and World Politics: Perspectives, Policies, and Prospects. Bergin & Garvey.
    Written as an introductory textbook for the study of world politics and the analysis of gender, this work is suitable for courses in International Relations, ...
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Sigal R. Benporath (2002). Fire With Water: Generations and Genders of Western Political Thought (Review). Hypatia 17 (3):265-267.
  13. Peta Bowden & Jane Mummery (2009). Understanding Feminism. Acumen.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Rosi Braidotti (2003). Feminist Philosophies. In Mary Eagleton (ed.), A Concise Companion to Feminist Theory. Blackwell.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Paloma Brook (2004). Feministische Philosophie in Italien. Die Philosophin 15 (29):61-67.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Eve Browning (1993). Philosophy and Feminist Criticism: An Introduction. Paragon House.
  17. Valerie Bryson (2003). Feminist Political Theory: An Introduction. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Feminist Political Theory provides both a wide-ranging history of western feminist thought and a lucid analysis of contemporary debates. It offers an accessible and thought-provoking account of complex theories, which it relates to 'real-life' issues such as sexual violence, political representation and the family. This timely new edition has been thoroughly updated to incorporate the most recent developments in feminism and feminist scholarship throughout, in particular taking into account the impact of black and postmodern feminist thought on feminist political theory.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Elvira Burgos Díaz (2002). Feministische Philosophie in Spanien. Die Philosophin 13 (26):43-56.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Judith Butler & Joan Wallach Scott (eds.) (1992). Feminists Theorize the Political. Routledge.
  20. Kate Campbell (ed.) (1992). Critical Feminism: Argument in the Disciplines. Open University Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Lorraine Code (ed.) (2000). Encyclopedia of Feminist Theories. Routledge.
    The path-breaking Encyclopedia of Feminist Theories is an accessible, multidisciplinary insight into the complex field of feminist thought. The Encyclopedia contains over 500 authoritative entries commissioned from an international team of contributors and includes clear, concise and provocative explanations of key themes and ideas. Each entry contains cross references and a bibliographic guide to further reading; over 50 biographical entries provide readers with a sense of how the theories they encounter have developed out of the lives and situations of their (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Ann E. Cudd & Robin O. Andreasen (eds.) (2005). Feminist Theory: A Philosophical Anthology. Blackwell Pub..
  23. Rosalyn Diprose (2000). What is (Feminist) Philosophy? Hypatia 15 (2):115-132.
    : What makes us think, and what makes us think as feminists? In seeking to answer these questions, this paper draws on both Deleuze and Guattari's account of the creation of concepts, and feminist thought on feminist thinking, before suggesting with Levinas that our relation to ideas is primarily affective. Via further engagement with Levinas, I argue that it is the relation to the other which provokes and produces thought; models of autonomous theorizing are thereby supplanted by the teaching of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Josephine Donovan (2000). Feminist Theory: The Intellectual Traditions. Continuum.
    This first major study of feminist theory, which has been revised and completely reset, now takes the reader into the twenty-first century.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Lisa Dresdner & Laurel S. Peterson (eds.) (2009). (Re)Interpretations: The Shapes of Justice in Women's Experience. Cambridge Scholars.
  26. Susan Dwyer (1996). Who's Afraid of Feminism? Dialogue 35 (02):327-.
  27. Mary Eagleton (ed.) (2003). A Concise Companion to Feminist Theory. Blackwell.
    A Concise Companion to Feminist Theory introduces readers to the broad scope of feminist theory over the past 35 years.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Terence Rajivan Edward (2012). Feminist Research and Paradigm Shift in Anthropology. Meta 4 (2):343-362.
    In her paper ‘An Awkward Relationship: the Case of Feminism and Anthropology’, Marilyn Strathern argues that feminist research cannot produce a paradigm shift in social anthropology. I reconstruct her arguments and evaluate them, revealing that they are insufficient for ruling out this possibility.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Jane English (1980). Is Feminism Philosophy? Teaching Philosophy 3 (4):397-403.
  30. Judith Evans (1995). Feminist Theory Today: An Introduction to Second-Wave Feminism. Sage Publications.
    This authoritative and lively exploration of the theories of contemporary feminism covers all the major variants of feminist political thought from the "traditional" schools of the women's movement-particularly radical, liberal, and socialist-to today's postmodern texts. Feminist Theory Today examines the epistemological challenge from critical legal theory and postmodernist thought; the divergences within, as well as between, feminist schools; and the protests from women marginalized by the feminist movement, including those who are lesbian and those who are black. It also interrogates (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Mary Evans (ed.) (2001/2003). Feminism: Critical Concepts in Literary and Cultural Studies. Routledge.
    This set reprints a wide range of key articles exploring the role of feminists in the development of post-Enlightenment thought. Including groundbreaking work from the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s, with pieces by Sandra Harding, Julia Kristeva, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, Elizabeth Spelman, and other internationally-esteemed scholars, the collection features an original introduction and comprehensive index, making this an invaluable resource for women's studies students in a wide range of subject areas. For a full listing of contents, visit www.routledge-ny.com and type the (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Mary Evans (1997). Introducing Contemporary Feminist Thought. In Association with Blackwell Publishers.
    This book offers a clear and coherent guide to contemporary feminism for students of women's studies, gender studies, sociology, social theory and literary ...
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Clara Fischer (2012). Pragmatists, Deliberativists, and Democracy: The Quest for Inclusion. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 26 (3):497-515.
    Similarities between pragmatist models of democracy and deliberative models have been explored over recent years, most notably in this journal ( Talisse 2004). However, the work of Iris Marion Young has, thus far, not figured in such comparative analyses and historical weighing of pragmatist antecedents in deliberativist work. In what follows, I wish to redress this oversight by placing Young in conversation with John Dewey and Jane Addams. Young's particular brand of deliberative theorizing focuses on the inclusion of women and (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Michael Fox (1982). Feminism and Philosophy Mary Vetterling-Braggin, Frederick A. Elliston, and Jane English, Editors Totowa, New Jersey: Littlefield, Adams, 1977. Pp. Xiv, 452. $7.95, paperFeminist Frameworks: Alternative Theoretical Accounts of the Relations Between Women and Men Allison M. Jaggar and Paula Rothenberg Struhl, Editors Toronto: McGraw-Hill Ryerson, 1978. Pp. Xiv, 333. $10.75, Paper. [REVIEW] Dialogue 21 (01):141-147.
  35. Miranda Fricker & Jennifer Hornsby (eds.) (2000). Cambridge Companion to Feminism in Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    The thirteen specially-commissioned essays in this volume are designed to provide an accessible and stimulating guide through an area of philosophical thought ...
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Catherine Villanueva Gardner (2006). Historical Dictionary of Feminist Philosophy. Scarecrow Press.
  37. Ann Garry & Marilyn Pearsall (eds.) (1996). Women, Knowledge, and Reality: Explorations in Feminist Philosophy, 2nd Ed. Routledge.
    This second edition of Women, Knowledge and Reality continues to exhibit the ways in which feminist philosophers enrich and challenge philosophy. Essays by twenty-five feminist philosophers, seventeen of them new to the second edition, address fundamental issues in philosophical and feminist methods, metaphysics, epistemology, and the philosophies of science, language, religion and mind/body. This second edition expands the perspectives of women of color, of postmodernism and French feminism, and focuses on the most recent controversies in feminist theory and philosophy. The (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Judith Grant (1993). Fundamental Feminism: Contesting the Core Concepts of Feminist Theory. Routledge.
    What makes feminist theory feminist? How did so many different feminisms come to exist? In Fundamental Feminism, Judith Grant addresses these questions by offering a critical exploration of the evolution of feminist theory and the state of feminist thinking today. Grant provides a lively assessment of the major problems of contemporary feminist thought and identifies a set of common assumptions that link the wide variety of feminist theories in existence. Fundamental Feminism calls for nothing less than a substantial revision of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Karen Green> (2004). Book Review: Catherine Villanueva Gardner. Rediscovering Women Philosophers: Philosophical Genre and the Boundaries of Philosophy. Boulder: Westview Press, 2000. [REVIEW] Hypatia 19 (3):221-225.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Gabriele Griffin (ed.) (1994). Stirring It: Challenges for Feminism. Taylor & Francis.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Morwenna Griffiths (1989). Why Philosophy Needs Feminism. Cogito 3 (3):231-236.
  42. Sneja Marina Gunew & Anna Yeatman (eds.) (1993). Feminism and the Politics of Difference. Allen & Unwin.
  43. Susan Haack (1979). Feminism and Philosophy Edited by M. Vetterling-Braggin, F. A. Elliston and J. English Littlefield, Adams, 1977, 452 Pp., $7.95. [REVIEW] Philosophy 54 (208):242-.
  44. Elizabeth Hackett & Sally Anne Haslanger (eds.) (2006). Theorizing Feminisms: A Reader. Oxford University Press.
    "What is sexist oppression?" "What should be done about it?" Organized around these questions, Theorizing Feminisms: A Reader provides an overview of theoretical feminist writing about the quest for gender justice. Incorporating both classic and cutting-edge material, the reader takes into account the full diversity of women, highlighting the effects of race, ethnicity, nationality, class, sexuality, and religion on women's experience. Theorizing Feminisms is organized into four sections and includes fifty-four essays. The first section introduces several basic concepts commonly employed (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Sabine Hark (2005). Dissidente Partizipation: Eine Diskursgeschichte des Feminismus. Suhrkamp.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Sally Haslanger, Topics in Feminism. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Rosemary Hennessy (2003). Class. In Mary Eagleton (ed.), A Concise Companion to Feminist Theory. Blackwell.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Cressida J. Heyes (ed.) (2012). Philosophy and Gender: Critical Concepts in Philosophy. Routledge.
    v. 1. "Gender" and "Philosophy": contested terms -- v. 2. Gender and the history of philosophy -- v. 3. Knowledge and reality -- v. 4. Values and society.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Sarah L. Hoagland (1979). Women and Philosophy. Teaching Philosophy 3 (1):118-123.
  50. Stevi Jackson (ed.) (1993). Women's Studies: Essential Readings. New York University Press.
    "...No mere collection, but a wonderful synthesis of some of the best and most representative works of modern feminist scholarship, reflecting the richness and diversity of contemporary women's studies. It provides an informative and empowering perspective on feminist scholarly achievements of the last decades." -Dale Spender, Founding member of WITS (Women, Information, Technology, and Scholarship), is author of more than 30 books, including Feminist Theorists: Three Centuries of Key Women Thinkers and For The Record: the Making and Meaning of Feminist (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 91