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  1. Aboulafia (1984). From Domination to Recognition. In Carol Gould (ed.), Beyond Domination: New Perspectives on Women and Philosophy. 175-185.
  2. Penelope Deutscher (1994). "The Only Diabolical Thing About Women...": Luce Irigaray on Divinity. Hypatia 9 (4):88 - 111.
    Luce Irigaray's argument that women need a feminine divine is placed in the context of her analyses of the interconnection between man's appropriation of woman as his "negative alter ego" and his identification with the impossible ego ideal represented by the figure of God. As an alternative, the "feminine divine" is conceived as a realm with which women would be continuous. It would allow mediation between humans, and interrupt cannibalizing appropriations of the other.
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  3. Stevi Jackson & Jacki Jones (eds.) (1998). Contemporary Feminist Theories. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
  4. Linda S. Kauffman (1993). American Feminist Thought at Century's End a Reader. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
  5. Shelley M. Park (2013). Mothering Queerly, Queering Motherhood: Resisting Monomaternalism in Adoptive, Lesbian, Blended and Polygamous Families. SUNY.
    Bridging the gap between feminist studies of motherhood and queer theory, Mothering Queerly, Queering Motherhood articulates a provocative philosophy of queer kinship that need not be rooted in lesbian or gay sexual identities. Working from an interdisciplinary framework that incorporates feminist philosophy and queer, psychoanalytic, poststructuralist, and postcolonial theories, Shelley M. Park offers a powerful critique of an ideology she terms monomaternalism. Despite widespread cultural insistence that every child should have one—and only one—“real” mother, many contemporary family constellations do not (...)
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  6. Shelley M. Park (2007). Nomadic Musings: Living and Thinking Queerly. APA Newsletter on Feminism and Philosophy 7:1 (2007) 7 (1):17-20.
  7. Lise Pelletier, Guy Bouchard & Université Laval (1987). Femmes, Écriture, Philosophie. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    Dans cet ouvrage collectif, l'article de Guy Bouchard intitulé "Comment émasculiniser l' écriture philosophique" met d'abord en lumière le sexisme qui a caractérisé tant la philosophie que le langage en général; il s'interroge ensuite sur les façons "d'émasculiniser" l' écriture philosophique et au niveau de la pensée, et à celui du langage.
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Feminist Philosophy, General Works
  1. Linda Alcoff & Eva Feder Kittay (eds.) (2007). The Blackwell Guide to Feminist Philosophy. Blackwell Pub..
  2. Carolyn Allen & Judith A. Howard (eds.) (2000). Provoking Feminisms. University of Chicago Press.
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  3. Sonya Andermahr (1997). A Glossary of Feminist Theory. Distributed Exclusively in the Usa by St. Martin's Press.
    This glossary is both an introduction to the key words of feminist critical theories and a guide to their origins. Acknowledging the variety of contemporary feminist theories, the glossary includes entries on black, post-colonial, Italian, and French feminisms, and draws on a wide range of fields including semiotics, psychoanalysis, structuralism, poststructuralism, and deconstruction.
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  4. Barbara S. Andrew (2001). :A Companion to Feminist Philosophy. Ethics 112 (1):161-164.
  5. Saray Ayala (2015). Philosophy and the Non-Native Speaker Condition. American Philosophical Association Newsletter in Feminism and Philosophy 14 (2).
    In this note, my aim is to point out a phenomenon that has not received much attention; a phenomenon that, in my opinion, should not be overlooked in the professional practice of philosophy, especially within feminist efforts for social justice. I am referring to the way in which being a non-native speaker of English interacts with the practice of philosophy.1 There is evidence that non-native speakers are often perceived in prejudiced ways. Such prejudiced perception causes harm and, more importantly, constitutes (...)
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  6. Annette Baier (2001). Book Review. The Cambridge Companion to Feminism in Philosophy Miranda Fricker Jennifer Hornsby. [REVIEW] Mind 110 (438):464-468.
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  7. Alison Bailey & Chris Cuomo (2008). The Feminist Philosophy Reader. McGraw Hill.
    The most comprehensive anthology of feminist philosophy available, this first edition reader brings together over 55 of the most influential and time-tested works to have been published in the field of feminist philosophy. Featuring perspectives from across the philosophical spectrum, and from an array of different cultural vantage points, it displays the incredible range, diversity, and depth of feminist writing on fundamental issues, from the early second wave to the present.
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  8. Lawrie Balfour (2005). Representative Women: Slavery, Citizenship, and Feminist Theory in Du Bois's “Damnation of Women”. Hypatia 20 (3):127-148.
  9. Christine Bard (1998). Felicia GORDON, Maire CROSS, Early French Feminisms, 1830-1940. A Passion for Liberty, Cheltenham, UK, Brookfield, US, Edward Elgar, 1996, 287 p. [REVIEW] Clio 1:22-22.
    Early French Feminisms est un reader, type de publication encore peu développé en France, destiné principalement à un public étudiant. Y figurent des textes (par larges extraits ou dans leur intégralité) de Flora Tristan (1803-1844), Jeanne Deroin (1805-1852), Pauline Roland (1805-1892), Madeleine Pelletier (1874-1939) et Hélène Brion (1882-1962), assortis de longues introductions, de copieuses notes infrapaginales et d'une belle bibliographie. Cette anthologie a été conçue par deux hi..
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  10. Victoria Barker (1997). Definition and the Question of “Woman”. Hypatia 12 (2):185-215.
  11. Michèle Barrett & Anne Phillips (eds.) (1992). Destabilizing Theory: Contemporary Feminist Debates. Stanford University Press.
    In the past decade the central principles of western feminist theory have been dramatically challenged. many feminists have endorsed post-structuralism's rejection of essentialist theoretical categories, and have added a powerful gender dimension to contemporary critiques of modernity. Earlier 'women' have been radically undermined, and newer concerns with 'difference', 'identity', and 'power' have emerged. Destabilizing Theory explores these developments in a set of specially commissioned essays by feminist theorists. Does this change amount to a real shift within feminist theory, or will (...)
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  12. Sandra Bartky (1993). Reply to Commentators on Femininity and Domination. Hypatia 8 (1):192-196.
  13. Sandra Bartky (1989). Philosophy and More Practical Pursuits: Philosophers and the Women's Movement. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 4 (3):57-60.
  14. Elizabeth Ann Bartlett (1989). Sarah Grimké: Letters on the Equality of the Sexes and Other Essays. Hypatia 4 (1):175-180.
  15. Chris Beasley (1999). What is Feminism Anyway?: Understanding Contemporary Feminist Thought. Allen & Unwin.
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  16. Chris Beasley (1999). What is Feminism?: An Introduction to Feminist Theory. Sage.
    So what is feminism anyway? Why are all the experts so reluctant to give us a clear definition? Is it possible to make sense of the complex and often contradictory debates? In this concise and accessible introduction to feminist theory, Chris Beasley provides clear explanations of the many types of feminism. She outlines the development of liberal, radical and Marxist//socialist feminism, and reviews the more contemporary influences of psychoanalysis, postmodernism, theories of the body, queer theory, and attends to the ongoing (...)
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  17. Peter R. Beckman & Francine D'Amico (eds.) (1994). Women, Gender, and World Politics: Perspectives, Policies, and Prospects. Bergin & Garvey.
    Written as an introductory textbook for the study of world politics and the analysis of gender, this work is suitable for courses in International Relations, ...
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  18. Erin Beeghly (2015). What is a Stereotype? What is Stereotyping? Hypatia 30 (4):675-691.
    If someone says, “Asians are good at math” or “women are empathetic,” I might interject, “you're stereotyping” in order to convey my disapproval of their utterance. But why is stereotyping wrong? Before we can answer this question, we must better understand what stereotypes are and what stereotyping is. In this essay, I develop what I call the descriptive view of stereotypes and stereotyping. This view is assumed in much of the psychological and philosophical literature on implicit bias and stereotyping, yet (...)
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  19. Mary Field Belenky, Blythe Mcvicker Clinchy, Nancy Rule Goldberger & Jill Mattuck Tarule (1988). Women's Ways of Knowing: The Development of Self, Voice, and Mind. Hypatia 3 (2):177-179.
  20. Macalester Bell (2005). A Woman's Scorn: Toward a Feminist Defense of Contempt as a Moral Emotion. Hypatia 20 (4):80-93.
  21. Macalester Bell (2000). A Woman's Scorn: Toward a Feminist Defense of Contempt as a Moral Emotion. Hypatia 20 (4):80-93.
  22. Sigal R. Benporath (2002). Fire With Water: Generations and Genders of Western Political Thought (Review). Hypatia 17 (3):265-267.
  23. Paul Benson (2007). Feminism and the A-Word: Power and Community in the University. Hypatia 22 (4):223-229.
  24. Paul Benson (1990). Feminist Second Thoughts About Free Agency. Hypatia 5 (3):47-64.
  25. Sandrine Bergès (2016). A Republican Housewife: Marie‐Jeanne Phlipon Roland on Women's Political Role. Hypatia 31 (1):107-122.
    In this paper I look at the philosophical struggles of one eighteenth-century woman writer to reconcile a desire and obvious capacity to participate in the creation of republican ideals and their applications on the one hand, and on the other a deeply held belief that women's role in a republic is confined to the domestic realm. I argue that Marie-Jeanne Phlipon Roland's philosophical writings—three unpublished essays, published and unpublished letters, as well as parts of her memoirs—suggest that even though she (...)
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  26. Debra Bergoffen (2003). February 22, 2001: Toward a Politics of the Vulnerable Body. Hypatia 18 (1):116-134.
  27. Debra B. Bergoffen (2008). The Just War Tradition: Translating the Ethics of Human Dignity Into Political Practices. Hypatia 23 (2):72-94.
  28. Debra B. Bergoffen (1999). Marriage, Autonomy, and the Feminine Protest. Hypatia 14 (4):18-35.
  29. Susan E. Bernick (1992). The Logic of the Development of Feminism; or, Is MacKinnon to Feminism as Parmenides Is to Greek Philosophy? Hypatia 7 (1):1-15.
  30. Talia Mae Bettcher (2007). Evil Deceivers and Make-Believers: On Transphobic Violence and the Politics of Illusion. Hypatia 22 (3):43-65.
  31. Rosemary Betterton (2006). Promising Monsters: Pregnant Bodies, Artistic Subjectivity, and Maternal Imagination. Hypatia 21 (1):80-100.
  32. Janet Biehl (1992). Rethinking Ecofeminist Politics. Hypatia 7 (3):216-220.
  33. Carol Bigwood (1991). Renaturalizing the Body. Hypatia 6 (3):54-73.
  34. Megan Boler (2002). Feeling Power: Emotions and Education. Hypatia 17 (1):205-209.
  35. Susan Bordo (2004). Feminist Interpretations of Descartes. Hypatia 19 (2):190-194.
  36. Susan Bordo (1992). “Maleness” Revisited. Hypatia 7 (3):197-207.
  37. Peta Bowden & Jane Mummery (2009). Understanding Feminism. Acumen.
    "Understanding Feminism" provides an accessible guide to one of the most important and contested movements in progressive modern thought. Presenting feminism as a dynamic, multi-faceted and adaptive movement that has evolved in response to the changing practical and theoretical problems faced by women, the authors take a problem-oriented approach that maps the complex strands of feminist thinking in relation to women's struggles for equal recognition and rights, and freedom from oppressive constraints of sex, self-expression and autonomy. Each chapter focuses on (...)
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  38. Rosi Braidotti (2003). Feminist Philosophies. In Mary Eagleton (ed.), A Concise Companion to Feminist Theory. Blackwell
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  39. Paloma Brook (2004). Feministische Philosophie in Italien. Die Philosophin 15 (29):61-67.
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  40. Eve Browning (1993). Philosophy and Feminist Criticism: An Introduction. Paragon House.
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  41. Valerie Bryson (2003). Feminist Political Theory: An Introduction. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Feminist Political Theory provides both a wide-ranging history of western feminist thought and a lucid analysis of contemporary debates. It offers an accessible and thought-provoking account of complex theories, which it relates to 'real-life' issues such as sexual violence, political representation and the family. This timely new edition has been thoroughly updated to incorporate the most recent developments in feminism and feminist scholarship throughout, in particular taking into account the impact of black and postmodern feminist (...)
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  42. Elvira Burgos Díaz (2002). Feministische Philosophie in Spanien. Die Philosophin 13 (26):43-56.
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  43. Judith Butler & Joan Wallach Scott (eds.) (1992). Feminists Theorize the Political. Routledge.
1 — 50 / 268