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  1. Paul Benson (2007). Feminism and the a-Word: Power and Community in the University. Hypatia 22 (4):223-229.
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  2. Dwight Boyd (2011). Learning to Leave Liberalism…and Live with Complicity, Conundrum and Moral Chagrin. Journal of Moral Education 40 (3):329-337.
    This paper is a story of personal learning. I locate its beginning in my early, comfortable adoption of liberalism as the preferred perspective for my work as a philosopher of education. I then trace how and why I became disaffected with this perspective. I describe how learning from students, feminism and critical race theory led to an acceptance of the fact that my particular social locations as a white, upper-middle-class, educated, heterosexual man are not politically neutral as liberalism would have (...)
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  3. Rosa Bruno-Jofré (1998). Adriana Hernández, Pedagogy, Democracy, and Feminism: Rethinking the Public Sphere. Studies in Philosophy and Education 17 (2):207-210.
  4. William Cain & Ellen Messer-Davidow (1990). Dialogue on Feminism and Academic Change. Social Epistemology 4 (1):41 – 55.
  5. Maria Cimitile (2008). The Use of Bloom's Taxonomy in Feminist Philosophy. Teaching Philosophy 31 (4):297-310.
    Overcoming our disciplinary aversion to assessment mechanisms allows more possibilities for students to achieve fundamental philosophical skills. My essay discusses the use of Bloom’s taxonomy in a Feminist Philosophy course with detailed examples that demonstrate its efficacy as a learning and assessment tool that is particularly suited to philosophy, as well as how critical philosophy in general, and feminist philosophy in particular, is an ideal subject to help students gain critical thinking skills.
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  6. Claire P. Curtis (2003). Sexual Harassment. Teaching Philosophy 26 (1):111-114.
  7. John Darling (1986). Are Women Good Enough? Plato's Feminism Re-Examined. Journal of Philosophy of Education 20 (1):123–128.
  8. Madelyn Detloff (1997). Mean Spirits: The Politics of Contempt Between Feminist Generations. Hypatia 12 (3):76-99.
    Current models for individuation in academe exacerbate generational tensions between second and third wave feminists. Feminist pedagogues must be wary of getting caught in the "vicious circle of contempt," where students are expected to compensate for a teacher's past narcissistic wounds. Instead, we must be willing to mourn the wounds we have received at the hands of a contemptuous culture and to acknowledge same-gender attachments that are disavowed in dialectical models of subject production.
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  9. Penelope Deutscher (2006). When Feminism is "High" and Ignorance is "Low": Harriet Taylor Mill on the Progress of the Species. Hypatia 21 (3):136-150.
    : This essay considers the important role attributed to education in the writings of nineteenth-century feminist Harriet Taylor Mill. Taylor Mill connected ignorance to inequality between the sexes. She called up the specter of regression into lowness and ignorance when she associated feminism with progress. As she stressed the importance of education, she constructed an 'other' to feminism, variously associated with lowness, poverty, and the primitive. She made a case for the advantages of civilization (education, enfranchisement, equality) to be opened (...)
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  10. Joseph A. Diorio (1989). Feminist-Constructionist Theories of Sexuality and the Definition of Sex Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 21 (2):23–31.
  11. Joseph A. Diorio (1981). Sex, Love, and Justice: A Problem in Moral Education. Educational Theory 31 (3-4):225-235.
  12. Avigail Eisenberg (2006). Education and the Politics of Difference: Iris Young and the Politics of Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 38 (1):7–23.
  13. Carolle Gagnon (2002). Controversies in Feminism. Teaching Philosophy 25 (3):279-283.
  14. Michael Gard & Jan Wright (2001). Managing Uncertainty: Obesity Discourses and Physical Education in a Risk Society. [REVIEW] Studies in Philosophy and Education 20 (6):535-549.
    This paper considers the role of physicaleducation researchers within current publicconcerns about body shape and weight. UsingUlrich Beck's notion of `risk' it examines howcertainty about children, obesity, exercise andhealth is produced in the contexts of `expert'knowledge and recontextualised in the academicand professional physical education literature.It is argued that the unquestioning acceptanceof the obesity discourses in physical educationhelps to construct anxieties about the body,which are detrimental to students and silencesalternative ways of thinking and doing physicaleducation.
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  15. Sandy Grande (2003). Whitestream Feminism and the Colonialist Project: A Review of Contemporary Feminist Pedagogy and Praxis. [REVIEW] Educational Theory 53 (3):329-346.
  16. Pamela Grath (1989). "Am I That Name?" Feminism and the Category of 'Women' in History. Teaching Philosophy 12 (3):270-273.
  17. Barbara Houston (2002). Book Review: Megan Boler. Feeling Power: Emotions and Education. New York, London: Routledge, 1999. [REVIEW] Hypatia 17 (1):205-209.
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  18. Alison M. Jaggar (1977). Male Instructors, Feminism, and Women's Studies. Teaching Philosophy 2 (3/4):247-256.
  19. Patricia Ann Lather (1991). Getting Smart: Feminist Research and Pedagogy with/in the Postmodern. Routledge.
    The ways in which knowledge relates to power have been much discussed in radical education theory. New emphasis on the role of gender and the growing debate about subjectivity have deepened the discussion, while making it more complex. In Getting Smart , Patti Lather makes use of her unique integration of feminism and postmodernism into critical education theory to address some of the most vital questions facing education researchers and teachers.
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  20. T. Michael McNulty (1979). Teaching Feminism. Teaching Philosophy 3 (1):93-95.
  21. D. G. Mulcahy (2002). Knowledge, Gender, and Schooling: The Feminist Educational Thought of Jane Roland Martin. Bergin & Garvey.
  22. Carol Nicholson (1989). Postmodernism, Feminism, and Education: The Need for Solidarity. Educational Theory 39 (3):197-205.
  23. Nel Noddings (2009). Feminist Philosophy and Education. In Harvey Siegel (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Education. Oxford University Press.
  24. Kathryn J. Norlock (2012). Gender Perception as a Habit of Moral Perception: Implications for Philosophical Methodology and Introductory Curriculum. Journal of Social Philosophy 43 (3):347-362.
  25. Shelley M. Park (2007). Nomadic Musings: Living and Thinking Queerly. APA Newsletter on Feminism and Philosophy 7:1 (2007).
  26. Birgit Sauer (2007). What Happened to the Model Student? Austrian State Feminism Since the 1990s. In Joyce Outshoorn & Johanna Kantola (eds.), Changing State Feminism. Palgrave Macmillan.
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  27. Marsha Rockey Schermer (1980). Comments on Attig's ‘Why Are You, a Man, Teaching This Course on the Philosophy of Feminism?’. Metaphilosophy 11 (2):178–181.
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  28. Marion Smiley (1997). Feminist Theories. In Encyclopedia of Multicultural Education. Onyx.
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  29. Joris Vlieghe (2010). Judith Butler and the Public Dimension of the Body: Education, Critique and Corporeal Vulnerability. Journal of Philosophy of Education 44 (1):153-170.
    In this paper I discuss some thoughts Judith Butler presents regarding corporeal vulnerability. This might help to elucidate the problem of whether critical education is still possible today. I first explain why precisely the possibility of critique within education is a problem for us today. This is because the traditional means of enhancing a critical attitude in pupils, stimulating their self-reflective capacities, contributes to the continued existence and strengthening of the current societal and political regime. A way out of this (...)
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  30. Iris M. Yob (2000). Feminism in the Schools in a Postfeminist Age. Educational Theory 50 (3):383-403.