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  1. Margarita Gabriela Prieto Acosta (1999). Maria Angeles Barrere Unzueta, Discriminación, Derecho Antidiscriminatorio y Acción Positiva en Favor de las Mujeres. Feminist Legal Studies 7 (1):99-100.
  2. David M. Adams (2002). Families: Law, Gender and Difference. Hypatia 17 (3):254-256.
  3. David M. Adams (2002). Book Review: Janet L. Dolgin. Families: Law, Gender and Difference and Defining the Family: Law, Technology, and Reproduction in an Uneasy Age. By New York: New York University Press, 1997. And David M. Estlund and Martha C. Nussbaum. Sex, Preference, and Family: Essays in Law and Nature. New York: Oxford University Press, 1997. [REVIEW] Hypatia 17 (3):254-256.
  4. Catherine Albertyn (2004). Feminism and the Law. In Christopher Roederer & Darrel Moellendorf (eds.), Jurisprudence. Kluwer 291.
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  5. Linda Martín Alcoff (2004). Book Review: Drucilla Cornell. Just Cause: Freedom, Identity, and Rights. New York: Rowman and Littlefield, 2000. [REVIEW] Hypatia 19 (3):225-228.
  6. Linda Martin Alcoff (2000). On Judging Epistemic Credibility: Is Social Identity Relevant? In Naomi Zack (ed.), On Judging Epistemic Credibility: Is Social Identity Relevant? Wiley-Blackwell 235-262.
  7. Amy Allen (2007). Book Review: The Rights of Others: Aliens, Residents, and Citizens by Seyla Benhabib. [REVIEW] Hypatia 22 (2):200-204.
  8. K. Amirpur (2013). Women's Problems as a 'Women's Only' Problem? Debates on Gender and Democracy in Iran. Philosophy and Social Criticism 39 (4-5):407-415.
    In this article I will argue that in the last years the way of thinking about gender has undergone a change. I believe that in the Iranian public discourse, ‘the woman question’ has come to be viewed as part of the question of democracy. This is a recent development; until very recently, women’s legal discrimination was perceived in Iranian discourse as a ‘women’s only’ problem.
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  9. Lakshmi Arya (2006). The Uniform Civil Code: The Politics of the Universal in Postcolonial India. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 14 (3):293-328.
    This article speaks of a debate in contemporary India: that surrounding the validity of enacting a civil code that applies uniformly to all communities and religions in the state. In certain feminist arguments, such a code is seen as possibly providing a sphere of rights to Indian women that is alternative to the rights – or wrongs – given to them by the plural religious laws, which form the basis of the civil law in India. India, however, is a heterogeneous (...)
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  10. Amy R. Baehr (2008). Perfectionism, Feminism and Public Reason. Law and Philosophy 27 (2):193 - 222.
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  11. Amy R. Baehr (2003). A Feminist Liberal Approach to Hate Crime Legislation. Journal of Social Philosophy 34 (1):134–152.
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  12. Marcia Baron (2011). Gender Issues in the Criminal Law. In John Deigh & David Dolinko (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of the Philosophy of the Criminal Law. Oxford University Press
  13. Kate Bedford (2010). Markets and Sexualities: Introduction. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 18 (1):25-28.
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  14. Brenna Bhandar (2011). Editorial Introduction. Feminist Legal Studies 19 (1):1-2.
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  15. Katherine Biber, Book Review - 'Framed: Women in Law and Film' by Orit Kamir. [REVIEW]
    Book Review : Framed: Women in Law and Film, by Orit Kamir, Duke University Press: 2006.
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  16. Hazel Biggs (1997). Madonna Minus Child. Or—Wanted: Dead or Alive! The Right to Have a Dead Partner's Child. Feminist Legal Studies 5 (2):225-234.
  17. Jon Binnie (2009). Brenda Cossman, Sexual Citizens: The Legal and Cultural Regulation of Sex and Belonging. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 17 (1):115-119.
  18. Anne Bottomley & Simone Wong (2006). Special Issue: Domestic Partnerships: Stretching the Marriage Model? [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 14 (2):141-143.
  19. Jo Bridgeman (2003). Clare Williams, Mothers, Young People andChronic Illness. Feminist Legal Studies 11 (2):213-216.
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  20. Susan J. Brison (2001). Contentious Freedom: Sex Work and Social Construction. Hypatia 21 (4):192-200.
  21. Belinda Brooks-Grodon (2002). Suzanne M. Zeedyk, and Fiona E. Raitt, The Implicit Relation of Psychology and Law: Women and Syndrome Evidence. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 10 (2):195-197.
  22. Wendy Brown (1990). Manhood and Politics. Hypatia 5 (3):175-180.
  23. Eloise A. Buker (1991). The Female Body and the Law. By ZILLAH R. EISENSTEIN. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1988. Hypatia 6 (3):221-226.
  24. Melissa Burchard, Feminist Jurisprudence. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  25. Robert L. Burgess (1994). The Family in a Changing World. Human Nature 5 (2):203-221.
    Increasing numbers of young mothers in the work force, more and more children requiring extrafamilial care, high rates of divorce, lower rates of remarriage, increasing numbers of female-headed households, growing numbers of zero-parent families, and significant occurrences of child maltreatment are just some of the social indicators indicative of the family in a changing world. These trends and their consequences for children are described and then examined from the perspectives of microeconomic theory, the relative-income hypothesis, sex-ratio theory, and one form (...)
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  26. Ann Burlein (2005). The Productive Power of Ambiguity: Rethinking Homosexuality Through the Virtual and Developmental Systems Theory. Hypatia 20 (1):21-53.
  27. Nadya Burton (1998). Resistance to Prevention: Reconsidering Feminist Antiviolence Rhetoric. In Stanley French, Wanda Teays & Laura Purdy (eds.), Violence Against Women: Philosophical Perspectives. Cornell University Press 182--200.
  28. E. C. (1997). The Phenomenology of Pornography. Law and Philosophy 16 (2):177-199.
    Most people are familiar with Justice Stewart's now classic statement that while he cannot describe pornography, he certainly knows it when he sees it. We instantly identify with Justice Stewart. Pornography is not difficult to recognize, but it does elude description. This is because traditional attempts at description are attempts that seek to explain at either an abstract or empirical level rather than at the level that accounts for experience in its totality. Justice Stewart's lament represents the need to understand (...)
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  29. Joan Callahan (2001). Book Review: Leslie Pickering Francis and Anita Silvers. Americans with Disabilities: Exploring Implications of the Law for Individuals and Institutions New York: Routledge, 2000. [REVIEW] Hypatia 16 (4):147-155.
  30. Joan C. Callahan (2001). Americans with Disabilities: Exploring Implications of the Law for Individuals and Institutions (Review). Hypatia 16 (4):147-155.
  31. Joan C. Callahan (2001). Review of Americans with Disabilities: Exploring Implications of the Law for Individuals and Institutions by Anita Silvers and Leslie Pickering Francis. [REVIEW] Hypatia 16 (4).
  32. Joan Callahan, Laura Purdy & Kathy Rudy (1997). Reproduction, Ethics, and the Law. Hypatia 12 (4):202-211.
  33. Claudia Card (2007). Gay Divorce: Thoughts on the Legal Regulation of Marriage. Hypatia 22 (1):24-38.
  34. Claudia Card (2002). On Feminist Ethics & Politics. Hypatia 17 (4):233-235.
  35. Claudia Card (1986). Oppression and Resistance: Frye's Politics of Reality. Hypatia 1 (1):149-166.
  36. W. M. Childs (1909). Woman Suffrage: A Review and a Conclusion. Hibbert Journal 8:721.
  37. Drucilla Cornell (1991). Beyond Accommodation: Ethical Feminism, Deconstruction, and the Law. Routledge.
    This new edition of Drucilla Cornell's highly acclaimed book includes a substantial new introduction by the author, which situates the book within current ...
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  38. Sharon Cowan (2014). Motivating Questions and Partial Answers: A Response to Prosecuting Domestic Violence by Michelle Madden Dempsey. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 8 (3):543-555.
    Michelle Madden Dempsey’s compelling book sets out a normative feminist argument as to why and when prosecutors should continue to pursue prosecutions in domestic violence cases where the victim refuses to participate in or has withdrawn their support for the prosecution. This paper will explore two of the key aspects of her argument—the centrality and definition of the concept of patriarchy, and the definition of domestic violence—before concluding with some final thoughts as to the appropriate parameters of feminist prosecutorial decision-making. (...)
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  39. Kimberle Williams Crenshaw (1991). Mapping the Margins: Intersectionality, Identity Politics, and Violence Against Women of Color. Stanford Law Review 43 (6):1241-99.
  40. Margaret A. Crouch (2001). Thinking About Sexual Harassment: A Guide for the Perplexed. OUP Usa.
    Thinking About Sexual Harassment aims to provide the information necessary for careful, critical thinking about the concept of sexual harassment. Part I traces the construction of the concept of sexual harassment from the first public uses of the term through its definitions in the law, in legal cases, and in empirical research. Part II analyses philosophical definitions of sexual harassment and a number of issues that have arisen in the law, including the reasonable woman standard and whether same-sex harassment should (...)
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  41. Paisley Currah & Lisa Jean Moore (2009). "We Won't Know Who You Are": Contesting Sex Designations in New York City Birth Certificates. Hypatia 24 (3):113 - 135.
    This article examines shifts in the legal, medical, and common-sense logics governing the designation of sex on birth certificates issued by the City of New York between 1965 and 2006. In the initial iteration, the stabilization of legal sex categories was organized around the notion of "fraud"; in the most recent iteration, "permanence" became the measure of authenticity. We frame these legal constructions of sex with theories about the "natural attitude" toward gender.
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  42. Margaret Davies (2007). Unity and Diversity in Feminist Legal Theory. Philosophy Compass 2 (4):650–664.
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  43. Angela Y. Davis (2003). Racialized Punishment and Prison Abolition. In Tommy Lee Lott & John P. Pittman (eds.), A Companion to African-American Philosophy. Blackwell Pub.
  44. J. Dean (1994). Review Essay : Beyond the Equality/Difference dilemmaDrucilla Cornell, Beyond Accommodation: Ethical Feminism, Deconstruction and the Law (New York: Routledge, 1991) Mary Joe Frug, Postmodern Legal Feminism (New York: Routledge, 1992) Patricia J. Williams, The Alchemy of Race and Rights (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1991). [REVIEW] Philosophy and Social Criticism 20 (1-2):155-170.
  45. Judith Wagner DeCew (2006). Book Review: Anita Allen. Why Privacy Isn't Everything: Feminist Reflections on Personal Accountability. Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield, 2003. [REVIEW] Hypatia 21 (1):227-231.
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  46. Susan Dimock (2008). Reasonable Women in the Law. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 11 (2):153-175.
    Standards of reasonableness are pervasive in law. Whether a belief or conduct is reasonable is determined by reference to what a ?reasonable man? similarly situated would have believed or done in similar circumstances. Feminists rightly objected that the ?reasonable man? standard was gender?biased and worked to the detriment of women. Merely replacing the ?reasonable man? with the ?reasonable person? would not be sufficient, furthermore, to right this historic wrong. Rather, in a wide range of cases, feminist theorists and legal practitioners (...)
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  47. Nadine Faulkner (2005). Theorizing Backlash: Philosophical Reflections on the Resistance to Feminism Edited by Anita M. Superson and Ann E. Cudd Studies in Social, Political, and Legal Philosophy Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2002, Xxiii + 269 Pp. [REVIEW] Dialogue 44 (01):201-.
  48. Leslie Francis (2003). Book Review: Jane Flax. The American Dream in Black and White: The Clarence Thomas Hearings. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1998. [REVIEW] Hypatia 18 (3):232-235.
  49. Leslie Francis (2003). Book Review: Sandra Berns. To Speak as a Judge: Difference, Voice, and Power. Brookfield, Vt.: Ashgate Publishing, 1999. [REVIEW] Hypatia 18 (3):235-237.
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  50. Adam Gearey (2004). Here Come the Warm Jets: Adventures in Law, Literature and Feminism. Res Publica 10 (3):275-283.
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1 — 50 / 85