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  1. David M. Adams (2002). Families: Law, Gender and Difference. Hypatia 17 (3):254-256.
  2. David M. Adams (2002). Book Review: Janet L. Dolgin. Families: Law, Gender and Difference and Defining the Family: Law, Technology, and Reproduction in an Uneasy Age. By New York: New York University Press, 1997. And David M. Estlund and Martha C. Nussbaum. Sex, Preference, and Family: Essays in Law and Nature. New York: Oxford University Press, 1997. [REVIEW] Hypatia 17 (3):254-256.
  3. Linda Martín Alcoff (2004). Book Review: Drucilla Cornell. Just Cause: Freedom, Identity, and Rights. New York: Rowman and Littlefield, 2000. [REVIEW] Hypatia 19 (3):225-228.
  4. Linda Martin Alcoff (2000). On Judging Epistemic Credibility: Is Social Identity Relevant? In Naomi Zack (ed.), On Judging Epistemic Credibility: Is Social Identity Relevant? Wiley-Blackwell. 235-262.
  5. Amy Allen (2007). Book Review: The Rights of Others: Aliens, Residents, and Citizens by Seyla Benhabib. [REVIEW] Hypatia 22 (2):200-204.
  6. K. Amirpur (2013). Women's Problems as a 'Women's Only' Problem? Debates on Gender and Democracy in Iran. Philosophy and Social Criticism 39 (4-5):407-415.
    In this article I will argue that in the last years the way of thinking about gender has undergone a change. I believe that in the Iranian public discourse, ‘the woman question’ has come to be viewed as part of the question of democracy. This is a recent development; until very recently, women’s legal discrimination was perceived in Iranian discourse as a ‘women’s only’ problem.
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  7. Amy R. Baehr (2008). Perfectionism, Feminism and Public Reason. Law and Philosophy 27 (2):193 - 222.
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  8. Amy R. Baehr (2003). A Feminist Liberal Approach to Hate Crime Legislation. Journal of Social Philosophy 34 (1):134–152.
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  9. Marcia Baron (2011). Gender Issues in the Criminal Law. In John Deigh & David Dolinko (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of the Philosophy of the Criminal Law. Oxford University Press.
  10. Eloise A. Buker (1991). The Female Body and the Law. By ZILLAH R. EISENSTEIN. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1988. Hypatia 6 (3):221-226.
  11. Melissa Burchard, Feminist Jurisprudence. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  12. E. C. (1997). The Phenomenology of Pornography. Law and Philosophy 16 (2):177-199.
    Most people are familiar with Justice Stewart's now classic statement that while he cannot describe pornography, he certainly knows it when he sees it. We instantly identify with Justice Stewart. Pornography is not difficult to recognize, but it does elude description. This is because traditional attempts at description are attempts that seek to explain at either an abstract or empirical level rather than at the level that accounts for experience in its totality. Justice Stewart's lament represents the need to understand (...)
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  13. Joan Callahan (2001). Book Review: Leslie Pickering Francis and Anita Silvers. Americans with Disabilities: Exploring Implications of the Law for Individuals and Institutions New York: Routledge, 2000. [REVIEW] Hypatia 16 (4):147-155.
  14. Joan C. Callahan (2001). Americans with Disabilities: Exploring Implications of the Law for Individuals and Institutions (Review). Hypatia 16 (4):147-155.
  15. Joan C. Callahan (2001). Review of Americans with Disabilities: Exploring Implications of the Law for Individuals and Institutions by Anita Silvers and Leslie Pickering Francis. [REVIEW] Hypatia 16 (4).
  16. Drucilla Cornell (1991). Beyond Accommodation: Ethical Feminism, Deconstruction, and the Law. Routledge.
    This new edition of Drucilla Cornell's highly acclaimed book includes a substantial new introduction by the author, which situates the book within current ...
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  17. Sharon Cowan (forthcoming). Motivating Questions and Partial Answers: A Response to Prosecuting Domestic Violence by Michelle Madden Dempsey. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-13.
    Michelle Madden Dempsey’s compelling book sets out a normative feminist argument as to why and when prosecutors should continue to pursue prosecutions in domestic violence cases where the victim refuses to participate in or has withdrawn their support for the prosecution. This paper will explore two of the key aspects of her argument—the centrality and definition of the concept of patriarchy, and the definition of domestic violence—before concluding with some final thoughts as to the appropriate parameters of feminist prosecutorial decision-making. (...)
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  18. Margaret A. Crouch (2001). Thinking About Sexual Harassment: A Guide for the Perplexed. OUP USA.
    Thinking About Sexual Harassment aims to provide the information necessary for careful, critical thinking about the concept of sexual harassment. Part I traces the construction of the concept of sexual harassment from the first public uses of the term through its definitions in the law, in legal cases, and in empirical research. Part II analyses philosophical definitions of sexual harassment and a number of issues that have arisen in the law, including the reasonable woman standard and whether same-sex harassment should (...)
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  19. Paisley Currah & Lisa Jean Moore (2009). "We Won't Know Who You Are": Contesting Sex Designations in New York City Birth Certificates. Hypatia 24 (3):113 - 135.
    This article examines shifts in the legal, medical, and common-sense logics governing the designation of sex on birth certificates issued by the City of New York between 1965 and 2006. In the initial iteration, the stabilization of legal sex categories was organized around the notion of "fraud"; in the most recent iteration, "permanence" became the measure of authenticity. We frame these legal constructions of sex with theories about the "natural attitude" toward gender.
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  20. Margaret Davies (2007). Unity and Diversity in Feminist Legal Theory. Philosophy Compass 2 (4):650–664.
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  21. Angela Y. Davis (2003). Racialized Punishment and Prison Abolition. In Tommy Lee Lott & John P. Pittman (eds.), A Companion to African-American Philosophy. Blackwell Pub..
  22. J. Dean (1994). Review Essay : Beyond the Equality/Difference dilemmaDrucilla Cornell, Beyond Accommodation: Ethical Feminism, Deconstruction and the Law (New York: Routledge, 1991) Mary Joe Frug, Postmodern Legal Feminism (New York: Routledge, 1992) Patricia J. Williams, The Alchemy of Race and Rights (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1991). [REVIEW] Philosophy and Social Criticism 20 (1-2):155-170.
  23. Judith Wagner DeCew (2006). Book Review: Anita Allen. Why Privacy Isn't Everything: Feminist Reflections on Personal Accountability. Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield, 2003. [REVIEW] Hypatia 21 (1):227-231.
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  24. Susan Dimock (2008). Reasonable Women in the Law. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 11 (2):153-175.
    Standards of reasonableness are pervasive in law. Whether a belief or conduct is reasonable is determined by reference to what a ?reasonable man? similarly situated would have believed or done in similar circumstances. Feminists rightly objected that the ?reasonable man? standard was gender?biased and worked to the detriment of women. Merely replacing the ?reasonable man? with the ?reasonable person? would not be sufficient, furthermore, to right this historic wrong. Rather, in a wide range of cases, feminist theorists and legal practitioners (...)
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  25. Nadine Faulkner (2005). Theorizing Backlash: Philosophical Reflections on the Resistance to Feminism Edited by Anita M. Superson and Ann E. Cudd Studies in Social, Political, and Legal Philosophy Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2002, Xxiii + 269 Pp. [REVIEW] Dialogue 44 (01):201-.
  26. Leslie Francis (2003). Book Review: Jane Flax. The American Dream in Black and White: The Clarence Thomas Hearings. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1998. [REVIEW] Hypatia 18 (3):232-235.
  27. Leslie Francis (2003). Book Review: Sandra Berns. To Speak as a Judge: Difference, Voice, and Power. Brookfield, Vt.: Ashgate Publishing, 1999. [REVIEW] Hypatia 18 (3):235-237.
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  28. Adam Gearey (2004). Here Come the Warm Jets: Adventures in Law, Literature and Feminism. Res Publica 10 (3):275-283.
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  29. Loraine Gelsthorpe (2004). Back to Basics in Crime Control: Weaving in Women. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 7 (2):76-103.
    This essay identifies areas of analysis which David Garland neglects in The Culture of Control. The essential argument being that greater attention to the influence of feminism and the treatment of female offenders and victims would have enriched his interpretation of the culture of control. The essay suggests that the treatment of women in criminal justice matters exemplifies the apparently dualistic and polarised penal policies that Garland describes so well. The recent huge increases in the number of women sentenced to (...)
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  30. Helga Geyer-Ryan (1996). From Morality to Mortality: Women and the Violence of Political Change, or Law and (B)Order. Philosophy and Social Criticism 22 (4):1-11.
  31. Jane Greenlaw (1981). Delivery Rooms: For Women Only? Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 9 (4):28-29.
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  32. Christie Hartley & Lori Watson (2009). Feminism, Religion, and Shared Reasons: A Defense of Exclusive Public Reason. Law and Philosophy 28 (5):493 - 536.
    The idea of public reason is central to political liberalism's aim to provide an account of the possibility of a just and stable democratic society comprised of free and equal citizens who nonetheless are deeply divided over fundamental values. This commitment to the idea of public reason reflects the normative core of political liberalism which is rooted in the principle of democratic legitimacy and the idea of reciprocity among citizens. Yet both critics and defenders of political liberalism disagree over whether (...)
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  33. Brady Thomas Heiner (unknown). “From the Prison of Slavery to the Slavery of Prison”: Angela Y. Davis's Abolition Democracy. :219-227.
    One of the most radical dimensions of Davis’s critique of American democracy is her exposure of the vestiges of slavery that remain in the contemporary criminal justice system. I discuss this aspect of her critical project, its roots in Du Bois’s critique of Black Reconstruction, and the way that it informs her prison abolitionism and her two-pronged program for the formation of a genuine “abolition democracy.” I conclude by reflecting upon Davis’s reticence about abolition as a constructive enterprise and assessing (...)
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  34. Paul M. Hughes (1999). Paternalism, Battered Women, and the Law. Journal of Social Philosophy 30 (1):18-28.
  35. Susan James & Stephanie Palmer (eds.) (2002). Visible Women: Essays on Feminist Legal Theory and Political Philosophy. Hart Pub..
    These questions lie at the heart of contemporary feminist theory, and in this collection they are addressed by a group of distinguished international scholars ...
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  36. Tsachi Keren-Paz (2010). Poetic Justice: Why Sex-Slaves Should Be Allowed to Sue Ignorant Clients in Conversion. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 29 (3):307-336.
    In this article I argue that clients who purchase commercial sex from forced prostitutes should be strictly liable in tort towards the sex-slaves. Such an approach is both normatively defensible and doctrinally feasible. As I have argued elsewhere, fairness and equality demand that clients compensate sex-slaves even if one refuses to acknowledge that fault is involved in purchasing sex from a prostitute who might be forced. In this article I argue that such strict liability could be grounded in the tort (...)
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  37. Elena Loizidou (2007). Judith Butler: Ethics, Law, Politics. Routledge-Cavendish.
    The first to use Judith Butlers work as a reading of how the legal subject is formed, this book traces how Butler comes to the themes of ethics, law and ...
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  38. Mary Kate McGowan (2012). On 'Whites Only' Signs and Racist Hate Speech: Verbal Acts of Racial Discrimination. In Mary Kate McGowan Ishani Maitra (ed.), Speech and harm: Controversies over Free Speech. Oxford University Press.
  39. Eduardo Mendieta (2007). 10. The Prison Contract and Abolition Democracy. Radical Philosophy Today 2007:209-217.
    This article discusses the fortuitous genesis of the book of my conversations with Angela Y. Davis, Abolition Democracy (Seven Stories, 2005) and traces some of the intellectual and philosophical sources that informed the specific questions and approaches that inform the dialogue. Davis’ relationships to Georg Rusche and Otto Kirchheimer, as well as to Foucault, are discussed. Similarly, Davis’ place within a critical black American political-philosophical tradition is analyzed. The essay focuses mainly, however, on the way in which Davis’ work on (...)
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  40. Vanessa E. Munro (2006). Resemblances of Identity: Ludwig Wittgenstein and Contemporary Feminist Legal Theory. Res Publica 12 (2):137-162.
    In a context in which there is manifest multiplicity in women’s daily lives, feminists have struggled to identify what it uniquely means to be a woman, without falling prey to charges of essentialism. Conscious, however, of the role which collective gender identity plays in providing coherence and motivation to feminist activity, a number of theorists have sought to find a way to retain group cohesion in the face of internal diversity. In this article, the merits and demerits of pre-existing attempts (...)
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  41. Jeffrey Paris (2007). 13. Abolition Democracy and the Ultimate Carceral Threat. Radical Philosophy Today 2007:237-247.
    The series of conversations between Angela Y. Davis and Eduardo Mendieta entitled Abolition Democracy is a powerful investigation of the failed moral imagination of imperial democracies. After examining their discussion of how truncated political discourses enable abuses in both war and imprisonment, I look to the “exceptional” status of war prisons such as at Guantánamo and Abu Ghraib. I argue that domestic prisons, like international war prisons, are means for the paradigmatic functioning of the exception in modern democracy, as described (...)
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  42. Janice Richardson (2009). The Classic Social Contractarians: Critical Perspectives From Contemporary Feminist Philosophy and Law. Ashgate Pub. Company.
    This book uses contemporary feminist insights to examine aspects of the classic social contractarians' arguments, concentrating upon the work of Hobbes, Spinoza ...
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  43. Karen H. Rothenberg (1996). Feminism, Law, and Bioethics. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 6 (1):69-84.
    : Feminist legal theory provides a healthy skepticism toward legal doctrine and insists that we reexamine even formally gender-neutral rules to uncover problematic assumptions behind them. The article first outlines feminist legal theory from the perspectives of liberal, cultural, and radical feminism. Examples of how each theory influences legal practice, case law, and legislation are highlighted. Each perspective is then applied to a contemporary bioethical issue, egg donation. Following a brief discussion of the common themes shared by feminist jurisprudence, the (...)
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  44. Barbara Secker (1999). Labeling Patient (in)Competence: A Feminist Analysis of Medico-Legal Discourse. Journal of Social Philosophy 30 (2):295–314.
  45. Sally Sheldon & Michael Thomson (eds.) (1998). Feminist Perspectives on Health Care Law. Cavendish Pub..
    This book brings together new work by some of the foremost writers in the health care law arena. It presents exciting new insights,drawing on feminist theory and methodology to further our understanding of health care law. Whilst the book makes a real contribution to both feminist debates and the analysis of this area of law, it is also accessible to the undergraduate student who is approaching this area of legal scholarship and feminist jurisprudence for the first time. Its focus is (...)
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  46. Patricia Smith, Feminist Philosophy of Law. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  47. Patricia Smith (1992). Discrimination and Disadvantage in Feminist Legal Theory: A Review of Ddeborah Rhode'sjustice and Gender. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 11 (4):431 - 447.
  48. Sarah Sorial (2011). Habermas, Feminism, and Law: Beyond Equality and Difference? Ratio Juris 24 (1):25-48.
    In this paper, I argue that Habermas' proceduralist model of law can be put to feminist ends in at least two significant ways. First, in presenting an alternative to the liberal and welfare models of laws, the proceduralist model offers feminism a way out of the equality/difference dilemma. Both these attempts to secure women's equality by emphasising women's sameness to men or their difference from men have placed the onus on women to either find a way of integrating themselves into (...)
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  49. Christopher Heath Wellman (2006). A Defense of Stiffer Penalties for Hate Crimes. Hypatia 21 (2):62-80.
    : After defining a hate crime as an offense in which the criminal selects the victim at least in part because of an animus toward members of the group to which the victim belongs, this essay surveys the standard justifications for state punishment en route to defending the permissibility of imposing stiffer penalties for hate crimes. It also argues that many standard instances of rape and domestic battery are hate crimes and may be punished as such.
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  50. A. Wertheimer (2001). Intoxicated Consent to Sexual Relations. Law and Philosophy 20 (4):373-401.
1 — 50 / 52