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Summary Feminist philosophy of mind is the practice of using feminist philosophies and methodologies to solve problems in traditional philosophy of mind and vice versa. A feminist approach asks us to consider the ways that placing different kinds of bodies at the center of philosophical analysis alters our traditional accounts of phenomena such as perception, intentionality, emotion, and consciousness. Classic topics in feminist philosophy of mind include the mind-body problem and its relation to male/female and woman/man dichotomies, analyses of racist and sexist perception such as colonizing gazes and sexist objectification, studies of the relations between specific emotions and sex or gender, and examinations of liberatory modes of consciousness such as mindfulness and consciousness-raising. An additional way to think about this philosophical category is that it involves the practice of making philosophy of mind more rigorous by casting a wider net and approaching its problems with a feminist lens.

 

 

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  1. Louise M. Antony & Charlotte Witt (eds.) (2002). A Mind of One's Own: Feminist Essays on Reason and Objectivity. Westview Press.
    A book of tremendous influence when it first appeared, A Mind of One's Own reminded readers that the tradition of Western philosophy-- in particular, the ideals of reason and objectivity-- has come down to us from white males, nearly all of whom are demonstrably sexist, even misogynist. In this second edition, the original authors continue to ask, What are the implications of this fact for contemporary feminists working within this tradition? The second edition pursues this question about the value of (...)
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  2. Robyn Bluhm (2012). Beyond Neurosexism : Is It Possible to Defend the Female Brain? In Robyn Bluhm, Anne Jaap Jacobson & Heidi Lene Maibom (eds.), Neurofeminism: Issues at the Intersection of Feminist Theory and Cognitive Science. Palgrave Macmillan.
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  3. Robyn Bluhm, Anne Jaap Jacobson & Heidi Maibom (2012). Introduction. In Robyn Bluhm, Anne Jaap Jacobson & Heidi Lene Maibom (eds.), Neurofeminism: Issues at the Intersection of Feminist Theory and Cognitive Science. Palgrave Macmillan.
  4. Robyn Bluhm, Anne Jaap Jacobson & Heidi Lene Maibom (eds.) (2012). Neurofeminism: Issues at the Intersection of Feminist Theory and Cognitive Science. Palgrave Macmillan.
  5. Cynthia Burack (1999). Book Review: Sue Campbell. Interpreting the Personal: Expression and the Formation of Feelings. Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press, 1997. [REVIEW] Hypatia 14 (3):176-178.
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  6. Cordelia Fine (2013). Is There Neurosexism in Functional Neuroimaging Investigations of Sex Differences? Neuroethics 6 (2):369-409.
    The neuroscientific investigation of sex differences has an unsavoury past, in which scientific claims reinforced and legitimated gender roles in ways that were not scientifically justified. Feminist critics have recently argued that the current use of functional neuroimaging technology in sex differences research largely follows that tradition. These charges of ‘neurosexism’ have been countered with arguments that the research being done is informative and valuable and that an over-emphasis on the perils, rather than the promise, of such research threatens to (...)
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  7. Cordelia Fine, Jillian Craigie & Ian Gold (2005). The Explanation Approach to Delusion. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 12 (2):159-163.
  8. Cordelia Fine, Rebecca Jordan-Young, Anelis Kaiser & Gina Rippon (2013). Plasticity, Plasticity, Plasticity… and the Rigid Problem of Sex. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 17 (11):550-551.
  9. Marilyn Frye (2011). Metaphors of Being a Phi. In Charlotte Witt (ed.), Feminist Metaphysics: Explorations in the Ontology of Gender and the Self. Springer. 85--95.
  10. Marilyn Frye (1983). The Politics of Reality: Essays in Feminist Theory. The Crossing Press.
  11. Ann Garry (1982). Narcissism and Vanity. Social Theory and Practice 8 (2):145-153.
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  12. Ann Garry & Marilyn Pearsall (eds.) (1996). Women, Knowledge, and Reality: Explorations in Feminist Philosophy, 2nd Ed. Routledge.
    This second edition of Women, Knowledge and Reality continues to exhibit the ways in which feminist philosophers enrich and challenge philosophy. Essays by twenty-five feminist philosophers, seventeen of them new to the second edition, address fundamental issues in philosophical and feminist methods, metaphysics, epistemology, and the philosophies of science, language, religion and mind/body. This second edition expands the perspectives of women of color, of postmodernism and French feminism, and focuses on the most recent controversies in feminist theory and philosophy. The (...)
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  13. María Lugones (2003). Pilgrimages/Peregrinajes: Theorizing Oppression Against Mulptiple Oppressions. Lantham.
  14. María Lugones (1987). Playfulness, "World"-Travelling, and Loving Perception. Hypatia 2 (2):3 - 19.
    A paper about cross-cultural and cross-racial loving that emphasizes the need to understand and affirm the plurality in and among women as central to feminist ontology and epistemology. Love is seen not as fusion and erasure of difference but as incompatible with them. Love reveals plurality. Unity-not to be confused with solidarity-is understood as conceptually tied to domination.
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  15. Keya Maitra (2013). The Questions of Identity and Agency in Feminism Without Borders: A Mindful Response. Hypatia 28 (2):360-376.
    Chandra Mohanty, in introducing the phrase “feminism without borders,” acknowledges that she is influenced by the image of “doctors without borders” and wants to highlight the multiplicity of voices and viewpoints within the feminist coalition. So the question of agency assumes primary significance here. But answering the question of agency becomes harder once we try to accommodate this multiplicity. Take, for example, the practice of veiling among certain Muslim women. As many third-world feminists have pointed out, although veiling can't simply (...)
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  16. Jen McWeeny (2011). Princess Elisabeth and the Mind-Body Problem. In Michael Bruce & Steven Barbone (eds.), Just the Arguments: 100 of the Most Important Arguments in Western Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell. 297-300.
  17. Jen Mcweeny (2010). Liberating Anger, Embodying Knowledge: A Comparative Study of María Lugones and Zen Master Hakuin. Hypatia 25 (2):295 - 315.
    This paper strengthens the theoretical ground of feminist analyses of anger by explaining how the angers of the oppressed are ways of knowing. Relying on insights created through the juxtaposition of Latina feminism and Zen Buddhism, I argue that these angers are special kinds of embodied perceptions that surface when there is a profound lack of fit between a particular bodily orientation and its framing world of sense. As openings to alternative sensibilities, these angers are transformative, liberatory, and deeply epistemohgical.
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  18. Jennifer McWeeny (2012). The Feminist Phenomenology of Excess: Ontological Multiplicity, Auto-Jealousy, and Suicide in Beauvoir's L'Invitée. Continental Philosophy Review 45 (1):41-75.
    In this paper, I present a new reading of Simone de Beauvoir’s first major work, L’Invitée ( She Came to Stay ), in order to reveal the text as a vital place of origin for feminist phenomenological philosophy. My reading of L’Invitée departs from most scholarly interpretations of the text in three notable respects: (1) it is inclusive of the “two unpublished chapters” that were excised from the original manuscript at the publisher’s request, (2) it takes seriously Beauvoir’s claim that (...)
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  19. Jennifer McWeeny (2009-2010). Origins of Otherness: Nonconceptual Ethical Encounters in Beauvoir and Levinas. Simone de Beauvoir Studies 26:5-17.
  20. Jennifer McWeeny & Ashby Butnor (eds.) (2014). Asian and Feminist Philosophies in Dialogue: Liberating Traditions. Columbia University Press.
    In this collection of original essays, international scholars put Asian traditions, such as Hinduism, Buddhism, Daoism, and Confucianism, into conversation with one or more contemporary feminist philosophies, founding a new mode of inquiry that attends to diverse voices and the complex global relationships that define our world. -/- These cross-cultural meditations focus on the liberation of persons from suffering, oppression, illusion, harmful conventions and desires, and other impediments to full personhood by deploying a methodology that traverses multiple philosophical styles, historical (...)
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  21. Naomi Scheman (2000). Feminism in Philosophy of Mind: Against Physicalism. In Miranda Fricker & Jennifer Hornsby (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Feminism in Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. 49--67.
  22. Naomi Scheman (1996). Reply to Louise Antony. Hypatia 11 (3):150 - 153.
    In her discussion of Naomi Scheman's "Individualism and the Objects of Psychology" Louise Antony misses the import of an unpublished paper of Scheman's that she cites. That paper argues against token identity theories on the grounds that only the sort of psycho-physical parallelisms that token identity theorists, such as Davidson and Fodor, reject could license the claim that each mental state or event is some particular physical state or event.
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  23. Naomi Scheman (1993). Engenderings: Constructions of Knowledge, Authority, and Privilege. Routledge.
    Naomi Scheman argues that the concerns of philosophy emerge not from the universal human condition but from conditions of privilege. Her books represents a powerful challenge to the notion that gender makes no difference in the construction of philosophical reasoning. At the same time, it criticizes the narrow focus of most feminist theorizing and calls for a more inclusive form of inquiry.
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  24. Naomi Scheman (1979). On Sympathy. The Monist 62 (3):320-330.
  25. Julie Yoo, Feminist Philosophy of Mind (Forthcoming). Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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