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  1. Pamela Sue Anderson (ed.) (2010). New Topics in Feminist Philosophy of Religion: Resistance, Religion and Ethical-Political Relations.
  2. Pamela Sue Anderson (2008). Feminist Philosophy of Religion. In Paul Copan & Chad V. Meister (eds.), Philosophy of Religion: Classic and Contemporary Issues. Blackwell Pub..
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  3. Pamela Sue Anderson (2007). Feminist Challenges to Conceptions of God: Exploring Divine Ideals. Philosophia 35 (3-4):361-370.
    This paper presents a feminist intervention into debates concerning the relation between human subjects and a divine ideal. I turn to what Irigarayan feminists challenge as a masculine conception of ‘the God’s eye view’ of reality. This ideal functions not only in philosophy of religion, but in ethics, politics, epistemology and philosophy of science: it is given various names from ‘the competent judge’ to the ‘the ideal observer’ (IO) whose view is either from nowhere or everywhere. The question is whether, (...)
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  4. Pamela Sue Anderson (2006). Life, Death and (Inter)Subjectivity: Realism and Recognition in Continental Feminism. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 60 (1/3):41 - 59.
    I begin with the assumption that a philosophically significant tension exists today in feminist philosophy of religion between those subjects who seek to become divine and those who seek their identity in mutual recognition. My critical engagement with the ambiguous assertions of Luce Irigaray seeks to demonstrate, on the one hand, that a woman needs to recognize her own identity but, on the other hand, that each subject whether male or female must struggle in relation to the other in order (...)
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  5. Pamela Sue Anderson & Beverley Clack (eds.) (2004). Feminist Philosophy of Religion: Critical Readings. Routledge.
    Feminist philosophy of religion as a subject of study has developed in recent years because of the identification and exposure of explicit sexism in much of the traditional philosophical thinking about religion. This struggle with a discipline shaped almost exclusively by men has led feminist philosophers to redress the problematic biases of gender, race, class and sexual orientation of the subject. Anderson and Clack bring together new and key writings on the core topics and approaches to this growing field. Each (...)
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  6. Harriet Baber, Feminism and Christian Ethics1 21.
    Currently a number of feminists in philosophy and religious studies as well as other academic disciplines have argued that policies, practices and doctrines assumed to be sexneutral are in fact male-biased. Thus, Rosemary Reuther, reflecting on the development of theology in the Judeo-Christian tradition suggests that the long-term exclusion of women from leadership and theological education has rendered the “official theological culture” repressive to women and dismissive of women’s experience: “To begin to take women seriously,” she notes, “will involve a (...)
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  7. Gretchen M. Baumgardt (2010). Reframing the Issues : An Ecofeminist Political Theology. In Philip J. Rossi (ed.), God, Grace, and Creation. Orbis Books.
  8. Craig Beam (2001). Becoming Divine: Towards a Feminist Philosophy of Religion Grace M. Jantzen Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 1999, Viii + 296 Pp., $49.95, 24.95 Paper. [REVIEW] Dialogue 40 (03):622-.
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  9. Elizabeth M. Bucar, Grace Y. Kao & Irene Oh (2010). Sexing Comparative Ethics: Bringing Forth Feminist and Gendered Perspectives. Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (4):654-659.
    This collaborative companion piece, written as a postscript to the three preceding essays, highlights four themes in comparative religious ethics that emerge through our focus on sex and gender: language, embodiment, justice, and critique.
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  10. U. M. Cadegan & J. L. Heft (1990). Mary of Nazareth, Feminism and the Tradition. Thought 65 (2):169-189.
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  11. Urszula Chowaniec & Marzenna Jakubczak (2012). Conceptualizing Generation and Transformation in Women’s Writing. ARGUMENT 2 (1):5-15.
    The main objective of this collection of papers is to explore ideas of generation and transformation in the context of postdependency discourse as it may be traced in women’s writing published in Bengali, Polish, Czech, Russian and English. As we believe, literature does not have merely a descriptive function or a purely visionary quality but serves also as a discursive medium, which is rhetorically sophisticated, imaginatively influential and stimulates cultural dynamics. It is an essential carrier of collective memory and a (...)
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  12. Nancy Frankenberry (2001). Book Review: Grace M. Jantzen. Becoming Divine: Towards a Feminist Philosophy of Religion. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1999. [REVIEW] Hypatia 16 (1):98-100.
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  13. Ann Garry & Marilyn Pearsall (eds.) (1996). Women, Knowledge, and Reality: Explorations in Feminist Philosophy, 2nd Ed. Routledge.
    This second edition of Women, Knowledge and Reality continues to exhibit the ways in which feminist philosophers enrich and challenge philosophy. Essays by twenty-five feminist philosophers, seventeen of them new to the second edition, address fundamental issues in philosophical and feminist methods, metaphysics, epistemology, and the philosophies of science, language, religion and mind/body. This second edition expands the perspectives of women of color, of postmodernism and French feminism, and focuses on the most recent controversies in feminist theory and philosophy. The (...)
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  14. Harriet A. Harris (2000). Grace Jantzen Becoming Divine: Towards a Feminist Philosophy of Religion. (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1998). Pp. VIII+296. £45.00 (Hbk), £15.99 (Pbk). ISBN 0 7190 5354 4 (Hbk); 0 7190 5355 2 (Pbk). [REVIEW] Religious Studies 36 (3):367-373.
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  15. Victoria S. Harrison (2007). Feminist Philosophy of Religion and the Problem of Epistemic Privilege. Heythrop Journal 48 (5):685–696.
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  16. Amy Hollywood (2001). Book Review: Mary A. Suydam and Joanna E. Zeigler. Performance and Transformation: New Approaches to Late Medieval Spirituality. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1999. [REVIEW] Hypatia 16 (2):106-108.
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  17. Grace Jantzen (1999). Becoming Divine: Towards a Feminist Philosophy of Religion. Indiana University Press.
    'What canst thou say?' Finding a feminist voice As long as their situation is apprehended as natural, inevitable, ard inescapable, women's consciousness of ...
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  18. Grace M. Jantzen (1997). Feminism and Pantheism. The Monist 80 (2):266-285.
  19. Kimerer L. LaMothe (2005). Reason, Religion, and Sexual Difference: Resources for a Feminist Philosophy of Religion in Hegel's. Hypatia 20 (1).
    : Reading Hegel's 1827 Lectures on the Philosophy of Religion alongside his Phenomenology of Spirit, I argue that his vision for becoming a self-conscious subject—or seeing (oneself as) "spirit"—requires taking responsibility for the insight that every act of reason expresses an experience of sexual difference. It entails working to bring into being communities whose conceptions of gender and the absolute realize this idea.
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  20. Kimerer L. Lamothe (2005). Reason, Religion, and Sexual Difference: Resources for a Feminist Philosophy of Religion in Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit. Hypatia 20 (1):120 - 149.
    Reading Hegel's 1827 Lectures on the Philosophy of Religion alongside his Phenomenology of Spirit, I argue that his vision for becoming a self-conscious subject-or seeing (oneself as) "spirit"-requires taking responsibility for the insight that every act of reason expresses an experience of sexual difference. It entails working to bring into being communities whose conceptions of gender and the absolute realize this idea.
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  21. Karmen MacKendrick (2005). Feminist Philosophy of Religion. Teaching Philosophy 28 (1):91-95.
  22. Marie-José Mondzain & tr Franses, Rico (2000). Iconic Space and the Rule of Lands. Hypatia 15 (4):58-76.
    : In the following extract, Mondzain examines the way in which the spiritual hegemony of the Early Christian and Byzantine church was transformed into political power. The primary tool used in this endeavor was the icon. The representation of the holy figures of Christianity as space-occupying physical beings puts into play a series of spatial operations which aided in the exercise of temporal, imperial authority.
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  23. Joanne E. Myers (2013). Enthusiastic Improvement: Mary Astell and Damaris Masham on Sociability. Hypatia 28 (3):533-550.
    Many commentators have contrasted the way that sociability is theorized in the writings of Mary Astell and Damaris Masham, emphasizing the extent to which Masham is more interested in embodied, worldly existence. I argue, by contrast, that Astell's own interest in imagining a constitutively relational individual emerges once we pay attention to her use of religious texts and tropes. To explore the relevance of Astell's Christianity, I emphasize both how Astell's Christianity shapes her view of the individual's relation to society (...)
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  24. Jordan D. Paper (2001). Feminism and World Religions (Review). Philosophy East and West 51 (1):118-120.
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  25. Marjorie Hewitt Suchocki (1994). The Idea of God in Feminist Philosophy. Hypatia 9 (4):57 - 68.
    The marginal position of women within the Western tradition provides a critical vantage point for feminist redevelopment of the notion of God. Feminists tend to replace the classical categories of substance philosophies traditionally used for God with relational categories often drawn from organic philosophies. They also project the dynamic character of language itself into the discussion of God. This essay focuses on these issues as they are developed by Mary Daly and Rebecca Chopp.
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  26. Brendan Sweetman (1999). A Feminist Philosophy of Religion. International Philosophical Quarterly 39 (3):363-365.
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  27. Sylvia Walsh (2000). Grace M. Jantzen, Becoming Divine: Towards a Feminist Philosophy of Religion. Bloomington and Indianapolis 1999. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 48 (1):59-61.
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  28. Carol Wayne White (2002). Poststructuralism, Feminism, and Religion: Triangulating Positions. Humanity Books.