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  1. Shelley A. Adamo (2013). Too Many Biologists: A Reply From Adamo. BioScience 63 (5):318-319.
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  2. Linda Alcoff (1987). Justifying Feminist Social Science. Hypatia 2 (3):107 - 127.
    In this paper I set out the problem of feminist social science as the need to explain and justify its method of theory choice in relation to both its own theories and those of androcentric social science. In doing this, it needs to avoid both a positivism which denies the impact of values on scientific theory-choice and a radical relativism which undercuts the emancipatory potential of feminist research. From the relevant literature I offer two possible solutions: the Holistic and the (...)
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  3. Linda Alcoff & Elizabeth Potter (eds.) (1993). Feminist Epistemologies. Routledge.
    This is the first collection by influential feminist theorists to focus on the heart of traditional epistemology, dealing with such issues as the nature of knowledge and objectivity from a gender perspective.
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  4. Anita L. Allen (2009). The Poetry of Genetics: On the Pitfalls of Popularizing Science. Hypatia 24 (4):247 - 257.
    The role genetic inheritance plays in the way human beings look and behave is a question about the biology of human sexual reproduction, one that scientists connected with the Human Genome Project dashed to answer before the close of the twentieth century. This is also a question about politics, and, it turns out, poetry, because, as the example of Lucretius shows, poetry is an ancient tool for the popularization of science. "Popularization" is a good word for successful efforts to communicate (...)
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  5. Elizabeth Anderson, Feminist Epistemology and Philosophy of Science.
    Feminist epistemology and philosophy of science studies the ways in which gender does and ought to influence our conceptions of knowledge, the knowing subject, and practices of inquiry and justification. It identifies ways in which dominant conceptions and practices of knowledge attribution, acquisition, and justification systematically disadvantage women and other subordinated groups, and strives to reform these conceptions and practices so that they serve the interests of these groups. Various practitioners of feminist epistemology and philosophy of science argue that dominant (...)
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  6. Elizabeth Anderson (2004). Uses of Value Judgments in Science: A General Argument, with Lessons From a Case Study of Feminist Research on Divorce. Hypatia 19 (1):1-24.
    : The underdetermination argument establishes that scientists may use political values to guide inquiry, without providing criteria for distinguishing legitimate from illegitimate guidance. This paper supplies such criteria. Analysis of the confused arguments against value-laden science reveals the fundamental criterion of illegitimate guidance: when value judgments operate to drive inquiry to a predetermined conclusion. A case study of feminist research on divorce reveals numerous legitimate ways that values can guide science without violating this standard.
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  7. Monica Aufrecht (2011). The Context Distinction: Controversies Over Feminist Philosophy of Science. [REVIEW] European Journal for Philosophy of Science 1 (3):373-392.
    The “context of discovery” and “context of justification” distinction has been used by Noretta Koertge and Lynn Hankinson Nelson in debates over the legitimacy of feminist approaches to philosophy of science. Koertge uses the context distinction to focus the conversation by barring certain approaches. I contend this focus masks points of true disagreement about the nature of justification. Nonetheless, Koertge raises important questions that have been too quickly set aside by some. I conclude that the context distinction should not be (...)
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  8. Drucilla K. Barker & Edith Kuiper (eds.) (2003). Toward a Feminist Philosophy of Economics. Routledge.
    Feminist economists have demonstrated that interrogating hierarchies based on gender, ethnicity, class and nation results in an economics that is biased and more faithful to empirical evidence than are mainstream accounts. This rigorous and comprehensive book examines many of the central philosophical questions and themes in feminist economics including: · History of economics · Feminist science studies · Identity and agency · Caring labor · Postcolonialism and postmodernism With contributions from such leading figures as Nancy Folbre, Julie Nelson and Sandra (...)
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  9. Ingrid Bartsch (2005). Is Science Multicultural? Postcolonialisms, Feminisms, and Epistemologies (Review). Hypatia 14 (1):132-135.
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  10. Ingrid Bartsch (1999). Book Review: Sandra Harding. Is Science Multicultural? Postcolonialisms, Feminisms, and Epistemologies. Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 1998. [REVIEW] Hypatia 14 (1):132-135.
  11. Ingrid Bartsch, Carolyn DiPalma & Laura Sells (1998). Book Review: Donna J. Haraway. ModestWitness@Second_millennium.Femaleman�_MeetsOncomouse?. New York: Routledge, 1997. [REVIEW] Hypatia 13 (2):165-169.
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  12. Michael Baur (1996). Klein, Ellen R. Feminism Under Fire. Review of Metaphysics 50 (1):164-165.
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  13. Susan E. Bernick (1991). Toward a Value-Laden Theory: Feminism and Social Science. Hypatia 6 (2):118 - 136.
    Marjorie Shostak's ethnography, Nisa: The Life and Words of a !Kung Woman, is analyzed as a case study of feminist social science. Three principles of feminist research are suggested as standards for evaluation. After discussion of the principles and analysis of the text, I raise a criticism of the principles as currently sketched. The entire project is framed by the question of how best to resolve conflict between researcher and participant accounts.
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  14. Lynda I. A. Birke (1994). Feminism, Animals, and Science: The Naming of the Shrew. Open University Press.
  15. Robyn Bluhm, Anne Jaap Jacobson & Heidi Maibom (2012). Introduction. In Robyn Bluhm, Anne Jaap Jacobson & Heidi Lene Maibom (eds.), Neurofeminism: Issues at the Intersection of Feminist Theory and Cognitive Science. Palgrave Macmillan.
  16. Robyn Bluhm, Anne Jaap Jacobson & Heidi Lene Maibom (eds.) (2012). Neurofeminism: Issues at the Intersection of Feminist Theory and Cognitive Science. Palgrave Macmillan.
  17. Tamsin L. Braisher, Matthew R. E. Symonds & Neil J. Gemmell (2005). Publication Success in Nature and Science is Not Gender Dependent. Bioessays 27 (8):858-859.
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  18. Roberta Brawer (1994). The Outer Circle: Women in the Scientific Community. Hypatia 9 (1):214-219.
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  19. Matthew J. Brown (2014). Values in Science Beyond Underdetermination and Inductive Risk. Philosophy of Science 80 (5):829-839.
    Proponents of the value ladenness of science rely primarily on arguments from underdetermination or inductive risk, which share the premise that we should only consider values where the evidence runs out or leaves uncertainty; they adopt a criterion of lexical priority of evidence over values. The motivation behind lexical priority is to avoid reaching conclusions on the basis of wishful thinking rather than good evidence. This is a real concern, however, that giving lexical priority to evidential considerations over values is (...)
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  20. Kirsten Campbell (2004). The Promise of Feminist Reflexivities: Developing Donna Haraway's Project for Feminist Science Studies. Hypatia 19 (1):162-182.
    : This paper explores models of reflexive feminist science studies through the work of Donna Haraway. The paper argues that Haraway provides an important account of science studies that is both feminist and constructivist. However, her concepts of "situated knowledges" and "diffraction" need further development to be adequate models of feminist science studies. To develop this constructivist and feminist project requires a collective research program that engages with feminist reflexivity as a practice.
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  21. Richmond Campbell (1994). The Virtues of Feminist Empiricism. Hypatia 9 (1):90 - 115.
    Despite the emergence of new forms of feminist empiricism, there continues to be resistance to the idea that feminist political commitment can be integral to hypothesis testing in science when that process adheres strictly to empiricist norms and is grounded in a realist conception of objectivity. I explore the virtues of such feminist empiricism, arguing that the resistance is, in large part, due to the lingering effects of positivism.
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  22. John H. Chandler (1987). Androcentric Science? The Science Question in Feminism. Inquiry 30 (3):317 – 332.
  23. Sharyn Clough (2013). Feminist Theories of Evidence and Research Communities: A Reply to Goldenberg. Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 2 (12):xx-yy.
    In a recent essay — “How Can Feminist Theories of Evidence Assist Clinical Reasoning and Decision-making?” — Maya Goldenberg discusses criticisms of evidence-based medicine (or EBM) (Goldenberg 2013). She is particularly interested in those criticisms that make use of an epistemic appeal to the underdetermination of theory by evidence...
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  24. Sharyn Clough (2012). The Analytic Tradition, Radical (Feminist) Interpretation, and the Hygiene Hypothesis. Out of the Shadows.
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  25. Sharyn Clough (2011). Gender and the Hygiene Hypothesis. Social Science and Medicine 72:486-493.
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  26. Sharyn Clough (2008). Science and Social Inequality: Feminist and Postcolonial Issues (Review). Hypatia 23 (2):pp. 197-202.
  27. Sharyn Clough (2008). Science and Social Inequality: Feminist and Postcolonial Issues by Sandra Harding. Hypatia 23 (2):197-202.
  28. Sharyn Clough (2004). Having It All: Naturalized Normativity in Feminist Science Studies. Hypatia 19 (1):102-118.
    : The relationship between facts and values—in particular, naturalism and normativity—poses an ongoing challenge for feminist science studies. Some have argued that the fact/value holism of W.V. Quine's naturalized epistemology holds promise. I argue that Quinean epistemology, while appropriately naturalized, might weaken the normative force of feminist claims. I then show that Quinean epistemic themes are unnecessary for feminist science studies. The empirical nature of our work provides us with all the naturalized normativity we need.
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  29. Sharyn Clough (1998). A Hasty Retreat From Evidence: The Recalcitrance of Relativism in Feminist Epistemology. Hypatia 13 (4):88 - 111.
    While feminist epistemologists have made important contributions to the deconstruction of the traditional representationalist model, some elements of the Cartesian legacy remain. For example, relativism continues to play a role in the underdetermination thesis used by Longino and Keller. Both argue that because scientific theories are underdetermined by evidence, theory choice must be relative to interpretive frameworks. Utilizing Davidson's philosophy of language, I offer a nonrepresentationalist alternative to suggest how relativism can be more fully avoided.
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  30. Sharon Crasnow (2013). Feminist Philosophy of Science: Values and Objectivity. Philosophy Compass 8 (4):413-423.
    Feminist philosophy of science appears to present problems for the ideal of value-free science. These difficulties also challenge a traditional understanding of the objectivity of science. However, feminist philosophers of science have good reasons for desiring to retain some concept of objectivity. The present essay considers several recent and influential feminist approaches to the role of social and political values in science, with particular focus on feminist empiricism and feminist standpoint theory. The similarities and difference, as well as the strengths (...)
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  31. Sharon Crasnow (2008). Feminist Philosophy of Science: 'Standpoint' and Knowledge. [REVIEW] Science and Education 17 (10):1089-1110.
    Feminist philosophy of science has been criticized on several counts. On the one hand, it is claimed that it results in relativism of the worst sort since the political commitment to feminism is prima facie incompatible with scientific objectivity. On the other hand, when critics acknowledge that there may be some value in work that feminists have done, they comment that there is nothing particularly feminist about their accounts. I argue that both criticisms can be addressed through a better understanding (...)
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  32. Sharon Crasnow (2004). Objectivity: Feminism, Values, and Science. [REVIEW] Hypatia 19 (1):280 - 291.
  33. Sharon Crasnow (2004). Review: Objectivity: Feminism, Values, and Science. [REVIEW] Hypatia 19 (1):280 - 291.
  34. Sharon L. Crasnow (1993). Can Science Be Objective? Longino's Science as Social Knowledge. [REVIEW] Hypatia 8 (3):194-201.
    In Science as Social Knowledge, Helen Longino offers a contextual analysis of evidential relevance. She claims that this "contextual empiricism" reconciles the objectivity of science with the claim that science is socially constructed. I argue that while her account does offer key insights into the role that values play in science, her claim that science is nonetheless objective is problematic.
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  35. Ann E. Cudd (1998). Multiculturalism as a Cognitive Virtue of Scientific Practice. Hypatia 13 (3):43 - 61.
    I argue that science will be better, by its own criteria, if it pursues multiculturalism, by which I mean an ethnic- and gender-diverse set of scientists. I argue that minority and women scientists will be more likely to recognize false, prejudiced assumptions about race and gender that infect theories. And the kinds of changes that society will undergo in pursuing multiculturalism will help reveal these faulty assumptions to scientists of all races and genders.
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  36. Inmaculada de Melo-Martín & Kristen Intemann (2011). Feminist Resources for Biomedical Research: Lessons From the HPV Vaccines. Hypatia 26 (1):79-101.
    Several feminist philosophers of science have argued that social and political values are compatible with, and may even enhance, scientific objectivity. A variety of normative recommendations have emerged regarding how to identify, manage, and critically evaluate social values in science. In particular, several feminist theorists have argued that scientific communities ought to: 1) include researchers with diverse experiences, interests, and values, with equal opportunity and authority to scrutinize research; 2) investigate or “study up” scientific phenomena from the perspectives, interests, and (...)
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  37. Petra de Vries (2004). Feminist Science Studies: A New Generation (Review). Hypatia 19 (1):302-304.
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  38. Michael R. Dietrich & Brandi H. Tambasco (2007). Beyond the Boss and the Boys: Women and the Division of Labor in Drosophila Genetics in the United States, 1934-1970. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 40 (3):509 - 528.
    The vast network of Drosophila geneticists spawned by Thomas Hunt Morgan's fly room in the early 20th century has justifiably received a significant amount of scholarly attention. However, most accounts of the history of Drosophila genetics focus heavily on the "boss and the boys," rather than the many other laboratory groups which also included large numbers of women. Using demographic information extracted from the Drosophila Information Service directories from 1934 to 1970, we offer a profile of the gendered division of (...)
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  39. Lisa M. Dolling (2009). Meeting the Universe Halfway: Quantum Physics and the Entanglement of Matter and Meaning. By Karen Barad. Hypatia 24 (1):212-218.
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  40. Matthew Drabek (2012). Philosophy of Science After Feminism. By Janet Kourany. (Oxford UP, 2010. Pp. Ix. + 149. Price US$99.00.). Philosophical Quarterly 62 (248):631-633.
  41. John Dupré (2012). Comments onPhilosophy of Science After Feminism, by Janet Kourany. Perspectives on Science 20 (3):310-319.
  42. Jane Duran (1998). Philosophies of Science/Feminist Theories. Westview Press.
    This book presents the current feminist critique of science and the philosophy of science in such a way that students of philosophy of science, philosophers, feminist theorists, and scientists will find the material accessible and intellectually rigorous.Contemporary feminist debate, as well as the debate brought on by the radical critics of science, assumes—incorrectly—that certain movements in philosophy of science and science-driven theory are understood in their dynamics as well as in their details. All too often, labels such as “Kuhnian” or (...)
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  43. Maureen L. Egan (1989). Evolutionary Theory in the Social Philosophy of Charlotte Perkins Gilman. Hypatia 4 (1):102 - 119.
    This paper examines Charlotte Perkins Gilman's connection with the evolutionist ideas of late nineteenth century Reform Darwinism. It focuses on the assumptions that her language and use of metaphor reveal, and upon her vision of human social evolution as a melioristic process through which the equality of the sexes must finally emerge.
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  44. Gillian Einstein (2012). Situated Neuroscience : Exploring Biologies of Diversity. In Robyn Bluhm, Anne Jaap Jacobson & Heidi Lene Maibom (eds.), Neurofeminism: Issues at the Intersection of Feminist Theory and Cognitive Science. Palgrave Macmillan.
  45. Walltraud Ernst (1998). Donna Haraway: ModestWitness@Second_Millenium. FemaleMan©_MeetsOnceMouse™. Feminism and Technoscience. Die Philosophin 9 (18):111-116.
  46. Yiftach J. H. Fehige (2009). Sexualized Brains. [REVIEW] Isis: 100 (4):887-888.
  47. Carla Fehr, Feminism and Science: Mechanism Without Reductionism.
    During the scientific revolution reductionism and mechanism were introduced together. These concepts remained intertwined through much of the ensuing history of philosophy and science, resulting in the privileging of approaches to research that focus on the smallest bits of nature. This combination of concepts has been the object of intense feminist criticism, as it encourages biological determinism, narrows researchers’ choices of problems and methods, and allows researchers to ignore the contextual features of the phenomena they investigate. I argue that (...)
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  48. Cordelia Fine (2013). Is There Neurosexism in Functional Neuroimaging Investigations of Sex Differences? Neuroethics 6 (2):369-409.
    The neuroscientific investigation of sex differences has an unsavoury past, in which scientific claims reinforced and legitimated gender roles in ways that were not scientifically justified. Feminist critics have recently argued that the current use of functional neuroimaging technology in sex differences research largely follows that tradition. These charges of ‘neurosexism’ have been countered with arguments that the research being done is informative and valuable and that an over-emphasis on the perils, rather than the promise, of such research threatens to (...)
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  49. Miranda Fricker (1997). Review of Feminism and Science. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 48 (4):618-620.
  50. Ann Garry & Marilyn Pearsall (eds.) (1996). Women, Knowledge, and Reality: Explorations in Feminist Philosophy, 2nd Ed. Routledge.
    This second edition of Women, Knowledge and Reality continues to exhibit the ways in which feminist philosophers enrich and challenge philosophy. Essays by twenty-five feminist philosophers, seventeen of them new to the second edition, address fundamental issues in philosophical and feminist methods, metaphysics, epistemology, and the philosophies of science, language, religion and mind/body. This second edition expands the perspectives of women of color, of postmodernism and French feminism, and focuses on the most recent controversies in feminist theory and philosophy. The (...)
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