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  1. Ruth Abbey (2001). The Complete Works of Harriet Taylor Mill (Review). Hypatia 16 (1):94-97.
  2. Ruth Abbey (2001). Book Review: Jo Ellen Jacobs Assistant Edited by Paula Harms Payne. The Complete Works of Harriet Taylor Mill. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1998. [REVIEW] Hypatia 16 (1):94-98.
  3. Brooke A. Ackerly (2007). "How Does Change Happen?" Deliberation and Difficulty. Hypatia 22 (4):46-63.
    : Theoretically, feminists ought to be the best deliberative democrats. However, political commitments (which this author shares) to inclusiveness on issues of reproductive health and gay and lesbian rights, for example, create a boundary within feminism between those committed to the "feminist consensus" on these issues and women activists who share some feminist commitments, but not all. This article offers theoretically and empirically informed suggestions for how feminists can foster inclusive deliberation within feminist spaces.
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  4. Brooke A. Ackerly (2000). Political Theory and Feminist Social Criticism. Cambridge University Press.
    In Political Theory and Feminist Social Criticism, Brooke Ackerly demonstrates the shortcomings of contemporary deliberative democratic theory, relativism and essentialism for guiding the practice of social criticism in the real, imperfect world. Drawing theoretical implications from the activism of Third World feminists who help bring to public audiences the voices of women silenced by coercion, Brooke Ackerly provides a practicable model of social criticism. She argues that feminist critics have managed to achieve in practice what other theorists do only incompletely (...)
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  5. Linda Alcoff (2000). Introduction to the Symposium on María Pía Lara's. Hypatia 15 (3).
  6. Linda Martín Alcoff (2004). Book Review: Drucilla Cornell. Just Cause: Freedom, Identity, and Rights. New York: Rowman and Littlefield, 2000. [REVIEW] Hypatia 19 (3):225-228.
  7. Linda Martín Alcoff (2000). Introduction to the Symposium on Mar�a P�a Lara's Moral Textures: Feminist Narratives in the Public Sphere. Hypatia 15 (3):161-162.
  8. Amy Allen (2009). Feminism and the Subject of Politics. In Boudewijn Paul de Bruin & Christopher F. Zurn (eds.), New Waves in Political Philosophy. Palgrave Macmillan.
  9. Amy Allen (2008). Power and the Politics of Difference: Oppression, Empowerment, and Transnational Justice. Hypatia 23 (3):pp. 156-172.
    This paper examines Young’s conception of power, arguing that it is incomplete, in at least two ways. First, Young tends to equate the term power with the narrower notions of ‘oppression’ and ‘domination’. Thus, Young lacks a satisfactory analysis of individual and collective empowerment. Second, as Young herself admits, it is not obvious that her analysis of power can be useful in the context of thinking about transnational justice. Allen concludes by considering one way in which Young’s analysis of power (...)
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  10. Amy Allen (2007). Book Review: The Rights of Others: Aliens, Residents, and Citizens by Seyla Benhabib. [REVIEW] Hypatia 22 (2):200-204.
  11. Amy Allen (2000). Feminist Narratives and Social/Political Change. Philosophy and Social Criticism 26 (4):127-132.
    Lara, Maria Pia, Moral Textures: Feminist Narratives in the Public Sphere (reviewed by Amy Allen).
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  12. Elizabeth Anderson (2009). Toward a Non-Ideal, Relational Methodology for Political Philosophy: Comments on Schwartzman's "Challenging Liberalism". Hypatia 24 (4):130 - 145.
  13. Julia Annas (1980). Women in Western Political Thought By Susan Moller Okin Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1980, 371 Pp., £13.60, £2.50 Paper. [REVIEW] Philosophy 55 (214):564-.
  14. Louise M. Antony (1995). Is Psychological Individualism a Piece of Ideology? Hypatia 10 (3):157 - 174.
    I analyze and criticize Naomi Scheman's argument for the claim that psychological individualism-the thesis that psychological states are entities or particulars over which psychological theories may quantify-has no legitimate philosophical backing and is instead an element of patriarchal ideology. I conclude that Scheman's argument is flawed and that her thesis is false. Psychological individualism is perfectly compatible with and may even be required by feminist political theory.
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  15. Richard Arneson, What Sort of Sexual Equality (If Any) Should Feminists Seek?
    The feminist critique of liberalism runs parallel to the Marxist critique of liberal equality and rights. In each case the objection is that a set of liberties and rights formally guaranteed for all does nothing to prevent unfair inequalities in substantive life prospects from burgeoning within this formally equal framework. Workers and capitalists are formally free to trade with each other on any mutually agreeable terms but the enormous disparities in ownership of property bring it about that workers are forced (...)
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  16. Alejandra Arroyo (ed.) (2007). El Pensamiento Feminista. Agencia Española de Cooperación Internacional, Ministerio de Asuntos Exteriores y de Cooperación.
  17. Fidelma Ashe (2006). The Virgin Mary Complex: Feminism and Northern Ireland Politics. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 9 (4):147-164.
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  18. Fidelma Ashe (2006). The Virgin Mary Connection: Reflecting on Feminism and Northern Irish Politics. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 9 (4):573-588.
  19. Carol Bacchi (2012). Strategic Interventions and Ontological Politics: Research as Political Practice. In Angelique Bletsas & Chris Beasley (eds.), Engaging with Carol Bacchi: Strategic Interventions and Exchanges. University of Adelaide Press.
  20. Amy R. Baehr (2004). Feminist Politics and Feminist Pluralism: Can We Do Feminist Political Theory Without Theories of Gender? Journal of Political Philosophy 12 (4):411–436.
  21. Amy R. Baehr (2002). Book Review: Alison Jeffries. Women's Voices, Women's Rights: Oxford Amnesty Lectures 1996. Boulder: Westview Press, 1999. [REVIEW] Hypatia 17 (1):197-200.
  22. Amy R. Baehr (1996). Toward a New Feminist Liberalism: Okin, Rawls, and Habermas. Hypatia 11 (1):49 - 66.
    While Okin's feminist appropriation of Rawls's theory of justice requires that principles of justice be applied directly to the family, Rawls seems to require only that the family be minimally just. Rawls's recent proposal dulls the critical edge of liberalism by capitulating too much to those holding sexist doctrines. Okin's proposal, however, is insufficiently flexible. An alternative account of the relation of the political and the nonpolitical is offered by Jürgen Habermas.
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  23. Cathryn Bailey (2009). Anna Julia Cooper, Visionary Black Feminist: A Critical Introduction. By VIVIAN M. MAY. Hypatia 24 (1):185-188.
  24. Cathryn Bailey (1997). Making Waves and Drawing Lines: The Politics of Defining the Vicissitudes of Feminism. Hypatia 12 (3):17-28.
    If there actually is a third wave of feminism, it is too close to the second wave for its definition to be clear and uncontroversial, a fact which emphasizes the political nature of declaring the existence of this third wave. Through an examination of some third wave literature, a case is made for emphasizing the continuity of the second and third waves without blurring the differences between older and younger feminists.
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  25. Bat-Ami Bar On (2008). The Opposition of Politics and War. Hypatia 23 (2):141-154.
  26. Bat‐ami Bar On (1994). Meditations on National Identity. Hypatia 9 (2):40-62.
  27. Andrea Baumeister (2006). Feminist Political Theory: An Introduction (2nd Edn). Contemporary Political Theory 5 (1):95.
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  28. Chris Beasley & Carol Bacchi (2012). Making Politics Fleshly: The Ethic of Social Flesh. In Angelique Bletsas & Chris Beasley (eds.), Engaging with Carol Bacchi: Strategic Interventions and Exchanges. University of Adelaide Press. 1099.
  29. Christina M. Bellon (2011). The Politics of Ourselves: Power, Autonomy, and Gender in Contemporary Critical Theory. By Amy Allen. Metaphilosophy 42 (3):340-345.
  30. Christina M. Bellon (2008). Introduction. Hypatia 23 (3).
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  31. Christina M. Bellon (2007). Globalizing Democracy and Human Rights by Carol Gould. Hypatia 22 (4):206-209.
  32. Sigal Ben-Porath (2008). Care Ethics and Dependence— Rethinking Jus Post Bellum. Hypatia 23 (2):pp. 61-71.
    In this essay, Ben-Porath begins from the assumption that just war theory should be extended to include a jus post bellum component. Postwar conduct should be significantly informed by a care ethics perspective, particularly its political aspects as developed by Joan Tronto and others. Care ethics should be extended to the international postwar arena with one significant amendment, namely, weakening the aim of ending dependence.
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  33. Seyla Benhabib (2008). Parité: Sexual Equality and the Crisis of French Universalism , and Women and Citizenship (Review). Hypatia 23 (4):pp. 220-225.
  34. Seyla Benhabib (2008). Parité: Sexual Equality and the Crisis of French Universalismby Joan Wallach Scott andWomen and Citizenshipedited by Marilyn Friedman. Hypatia 23 (4):220-225.
  35. Seyla Benhabib (1995). The Pariah and Her Shadow: On the Invisibility of Women in Hannah Arendt's Political Philosophy'. Political Theory 23 (1):5-24.
  36. Sigal R. Benporath (2002). Book Review: Allison Dube. Fire with Water: Generations and Genders of Western Political Thought. Calgary, Canada: Parhelion Press, 1998. [REVIEW] Hypatia 17 (3):265-267.
  37. Sigal R. Benporath (2002). Fire With Water: Generations and Genders of Western Political Thought (Review). Hypatia 17 (3):265-267.
  38. Paul Benson (2005). Book Review: Marilyn Friedman. Autonomy, Gender, Politics. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003. [REVIEW] Hypatia 20 (3):214-217.
  39. Debra Bergoffen (2002). Book Review: Caroline Joan S. Picart. Resentment and the ?Feminine? In Nietzsche's Politico-Aesthetics. University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1999. [REVIEW] Hypatia 17 (3):268-270.
  40. Debra B. Bergoffen (2004). Engaging Nietzsche's Women: Ofelia Schutte and the Madres de la Plaza de Mayo. Hypatia 19 (3):157-168.
    : Ofelia Schutte's relationship to Nietzsche is contentious. Sometimes she identifies him as an ally. Sometimes she calls him an enemy. Appealing to Nietzsche's abolition of the appearance reality distinction and to his discussions of women as skeptics, I turn to Ofelia's discussions of the Madres de la Plaza de Mayo to suggest that their protests can be understood as a Nietzschean politics of transvaluation where the myth of the mother and the materialities of women's bodies become the ground of (...)
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  41. Christina Bergqvist, Tanja Olsson Blandy & Diane Sainsbury (2007). Swedish State Feminism : Continuity and Change. In Johanna Kantola & Joyce Outshoorn (eds.), Changing State Feminism. Palgrave Macmillan.
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  42. Asha Bhandary (2013). Adaptive Preferences and Women's Empowerment. By SERENE J. KHADER. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2011. Hypatia 28 (2):390-393.
  43. Asha Bhandary (2010). Dependency in Justice: Can Rawlsian Liberalism Accommodate Kittay's Dependency Critique? Hypatia 25 (1):140-156.
    This essay assess the compatibility of Eva Kittay's dependency critique with Rawlsian political liberalism. I argue for the inclusion of a modified version of Kittay's revisions within Rawlsian theory in order to yield a theory that suppports a substantial subset of dependency work. Beyond these selected changes, however, I argue that Kittay's other proposed changes should not be included because they are incompatible with Rawls, and furthermore, their incorporation does not yield a theory that includes utter dependents.
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  44. Emanuela Bianchi (2012). The Interruptive Feminine: Aleatory Time and Feminist Politics. In Henriette Gunkel, Chrysanthi Nigianni & Fanny Söderbäck (eds.), Undutiful Daughters: New Directions in Feminist Thought and Practice. Palgrave Macmillan.
  45. Susan Bickford (2005). Reconstructing Political Theory: Feminist Perspectives (Review). Hypatia 14 (2):136-143.
  46. Susan Bickford (1999). Book Review: Edited by Mary Lyndon Shanley and Uma Narayan. Reconstructing Political Theory: Feminist Perspectives. University Park: Penn State Press, 1997. [REVIEW] Hypatia 14 (2):136-143.
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  47. Susan Bickford (1997). Anti‐Anti‐Identity Politics: Feminism, Democracy, and the Complexities of Citizenship. Hypatia 12 (4):111-131.
    In this essay, I argue that recent leftist criticisms of "identity politics" do not address problems of inequality and interaction that are central in thinking about contemporary democratic politics. I turn instead to a set of feminist thinkers who share these critics' vision of politics, but who critically mobilize identity in a way that provides a conception of democratic citizenship for our inegalitarian and diverse polity.
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  48. Peg Birmingham (2003). Holes of Oblivion: The Banality of Radical Evil. Hypatia 18 (1):80-103.
    : This essay offers a reflection on Arendt's notion of radical evil, arguing that her later understanding of the banality of evil is already at work in her earlier reflections on the nature of radical evil as banal, and furthermore, that Arendt's understanding of the "banality of radical evil" has its source in the very event that offers a possible remedy to it, namely, the event of natality. Kristeva's recent work (2001) on Arendt is important to this proposal insofar as (...)
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  49. Cynthia Bisman & Christine Koggel (2012). Gender Justice and Development: Local and Global. Ethics and Social Welfare 6 (3):213-215.
  50. Sidonia Blättler, Irene M. Marti & tr Saner, Senem (2005). Rosa Luxemburg and Hannah Arendt: Against the Destruction of Political Spheres of Freedom. Hypatia 20 (2):88-101.
    : Freedom, understood as active participation in public life, connects the thinking of Rosa Luxemburg with that of Hannah Arendt. Biographically separated through the rise and victory of the totalitarian movements, they both developed a concept of the political that is oriented toward freedom and that demonstrates—in spite of their different historical experiences—essential common features: both authors emphasize the recognition of difference as a presupposition for a critical discussion of norms, traditions, and authorities, for the capacity to make unconstrained judgments, (...)
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1 — 50 / 303